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L. V WELCOMES 
ALL NEW 
STUDENTS 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VILLANOVA 

VS. -L V. 
SEPT. % 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 26, 1929. 



NUMBER I 



FROSH EXAMS SHIM 



SfcRiES OF LECTURtS HtLP 
CLASS TO QUICKER 
ADJUSTMENT 



Following- the example that has 
been set by all of the foremost col 
leges and universities, .Lebanon Val- 
ley this year instituted a new 
wreshman Program which consisted 
largely of orientation tests and lec- 
tures. In every scnooi where this pro- 
cedure has been carried out, it ha* 
been definitely found that the Fresh- 
men are much better enabled to be- 
gin their regular college work with a. 
greater degree of success than in 
schools where they are plunged im- 
mediately into the daily routine. 

It has been customary to give a 
psychological examination of some 
sort to new students but this year 
placement tests covering such sub- 
jects as English, Mathematics, Civic*, 
and Government, Foreign Languages 
and General Science were added to 
the list of orientation tests. The re- 
sulting graphs of these tests wi'l 
prove invaluable to the varous pro- 
fessors in enabling them to assemble 
their classes in homogeneous groups. 

. Realizing how closely coupled tin 
library should be with a student's ac- 
tual class work, Miss Myers, the co 
!^ge . librarian, gave several lectures 
on the use of the library and its facil 
ities. Later in the week she tested 
the Freshmen on the library rules and 
regulations, a procaduce which wi.J 
save much time and confusion when 
the college session proper begins. 
(Continued on Page 4) 

CUSS OF '29 PURSUE 
TEACHING, BUSINESS 

Fourteen "Members of Class Enroll 
At Higher Institutions 



NEW MEMBERS ARE 

CHOSEN FOR LA VIE 



Three new members have oeen ap- 
pointed to La vie staff, ah of wlioivt 

ill assume their duties with the next 
issue. C. Alfred Shenk will fill the posi- 
tion of Managing Editor and Calvin 
Keene that of Associate Editor. These 
men succeed Norman Vinderwall and 
James C. Hazleton, respectively, the 
latter having matriculated at Wiscon- 
sin University. 

The position of Alumni Reporter, 
filled by Guy Latimer, who has also 
ft©r returned this year, will be discon- 
tinued. Another General Reporter wi-i 
be added in his place, with Roberl 
Raudabush appointed to this position 

— O— 

BISHOP SPEAKS AT 
OPENING SERVICE 



NYLIN PKIMES SQUAD 
t-UK flttST TUSSLE 

VETERAN GRIDDERS AND NEW 
TOTERS SHOW STRONG 
LINE-UP 



CONSERVATORY FACULTY ADD 
EFFECTIVE TOUCH WITH 
MUSICAL PROGRAM 



In a survey of the positions obtain- 
ed by the graduate in 4^h3 1929 claso, 
it was found that forty two of 
them are engaged in the teaching pro- 
fession. This is more than half of 
the number that graduated. Seven of 
these are supervisors or principals in 
their respective schools. 

Fourteen are continuing their stud- 
ies in other institutions of learning. 
Bonebrake Seminary claims three of 
these. Of the remaining number 
^even are in business, three are chem- 
ists, one is preaching, and one play- 
ing professional baseball. 

The following is a list of the teach- 
es and the places of their employ- 
ment: 

Hazel Bailey — Berkley Springs, W. 
Va. 

John Beattie — Liverpojl, Pa. 
Kathryn Bork — Peachbottom, Pa. 
Mary Bender — Quarryville, Pa. 
Carol Brinser, Boonton, N. J. 
Mary Clymer, Heilwood, Pa. 
Viola Dietrich, West Chester, Pa. 
William Emenheiser — Bridgeport, 
Pa. 

Ruth Essick, Thompson, Pa. 
E <3na Gorski— Garfield, N. J. 
(Continued on Page i) 



The opening chapel exercises o 
Lebanon Valley College with Bishop 
G. D. Batdorf as the speaker, were 
held on Monday, September 23, at 1U 
A.M. The service opened with organ 
music by Prof. Campbell. Dr. Gos- 
sard's short and impressive invocation 
very fittingly opened the year s work. 
Other very beautiful musical number: 
were rendered by Pro;. Crawford 
voice, Mrs. Bender, piano, Prof. 
Ms*sh, violin, and again Prof. Camp- 
bell on the organ. Dr. Jones, pastor 
of the college church, had charge of 
devotions and succeeded in inspiritioj; 
Ithe large audience with the worship- 
ful spirit. 

Bishop G. D. Batdoix, D.D., Ph.D., 
Harrisburg, Pa., deliveerd a very in- 
teresting lecture on faith He began 
by greeting everyone and eongratulat 
fng the students, especially the ne X 
ones, upon ussummg their new duties 
and sharing new opportunities 

(Continued on Page 4) 
— O— 

FACULTY MEMBERS MARRIED 
IN JUNE 



A post-Commencement event o< 
great interest was the marriage oi 
Miss Ruth E. Engel, Head of the Con- 
servatory of Music, to Dr. Andrew 
Bender, Professor of Chemistry, on 
Wednesday, June 12, at the home of 
the bride's brother, Mr. Ray Engle, 
of Palmyra. The ceremony was a 
picture of beauty throughout. 

The bride wore a dress of white 
satin, with formal bridal veil and 
orange blossoms. The bridesmaids 
were Misses Leila Flory, Myrtle, Turby, 
and Mary Elizabeth Engle, with Mrs. 
Allen Engle, of Seattle, as matron of 
honor. 

The ceremony was performed by 
Dr. G. S. Gossard and Rev. I. P. Gib- 
ble. Mrs. Edith Mills, contralto solo 
ist, and a string quartet furnished the 
music during the wedding. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bender will be at home 
to their friends after October 1. 



Lebanon Valleys gridders will open 
Uieir footoall season when tney meet 
tne strong Vilianova team at Villa - 
'nova Saturday. 

Coach Mylin is making every pos- 
siDle effort to have the team in nrsi. 
class condition for the opening game. 
A tough battle is assured as Coacu 
Stulduber'a Wildcats are a veteran 
outfit and have a wealth of reserve 
material.. 

At present Armour and Reese aac 
fighting to get the first call for the 
"tmapper back" position. Both play 
igood defensive games. 

Lichthaler and Joe Wood will un- 
doubtedly fill their old positions at 
guard with Kleinfelter and Maurice in 
reserve. Kelly and Bartiett will 
probably pair off at tackles while 
Stone and Warner are giving them 
a merry battle for the honor. Stone, 
a product of Trenton High and Ped- 
dle, is one of the fastest men on the 
team and can also paly a backftela 
position. Cunjack and Heller at end. 
are being pushed by Thrush and Or 
sino. Heller*>a rangy boy is expectee. 
to be a serious threat on offense for 
opposing teams while Cunjack can b 
depended to cut down any plays di- 
rected toward his wing. 

(Continued on Page 4) 

FRESHMEN ASPiltE TO 
POSITIONS 

Teaching gets majority with 
medicine in second place 



MR. LIGHT, COLLEGE 

BOOKMAN DIED 



Mr. Harry Light, known to alumm 
and present btudents as tne kindly and 
courteous gentleman who served them 
so often during visits to the college 
book store, died on June ISth. Mr: 
Light had been ill for several months 
previous and for a while had been a 
patient in a Philadelphia hospital. 

Mr. Light was a student at the loca. 
Academy in 1881. Twice he held the 
role among students as the "college 
bookman." In the early part of hL? 
life he had the college book « core for 
twenty years. He then sold the busi- 
ness, but returned five years ago and 
was owner of the store at the time of 
his death. 



T RECEPTION OPENS 
mm SOCIAL LIFE 



T CABINETS ARE 
HOSTS' OF TROSH. WEEK 

Hike, Sings, Banquet Show Social 
Side of College Life 



PAGEANT BY CABINETS IS 
FEATURE OF EVENING 



Like other classes that have come 
and gone at L. V. C, the Freshman 
and other new students have their 
aims and ideals. When the next 
four years shall have rolled away, tha 
class of 1933 will supply the world 
with its share of workers. Practi- 
cally all of the professions are rep- 
resented, and, when the expectations 
of this class are realized, there witl 
be a generous contribution to society. 
Following Is a list of the newcomers 
ind their intended work. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



The social life of L. V. C. was fit- 
tingly initiated Saturday evening, 
Sept. 21, 1929, in the form of the Stu- 
dent's Reception held in The Engle 
Conservatory. 

The annual Student's Reception is 
sponsored by the Y. W. C. A. and 
Y. M. C. A. and much credit is due to 
the endeavors of these young men and 
women in these societies who carried 
out the event so successfully. 

Both for new and old students thi 
Reception proved to be a success. For 
many of the old students it - gave an 
opportunity to greet their friends and 
for new students to learn new- 
friends. 

A fitting line from Carlyle "Musi;; 
is well said to be the speech of an- 
gels" introduced the music for the 
evening which was furnished by an 
excellent orthophonic yi jt ola. 

Miss Bernita Strebig, social chair- 
man of the Y. W. C A., introduced the 
speakers of the evening. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



The students extend their sym- 
pathy to . Mme. Green upon the 
death of • her husband, Captain 
Green. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE- 
SEASON 1929 

Sept. 28 — Vilianova at Vilianova. 

Oct 5 — Penn State at State Colleg*. 

0ct 12 — Franklin & Marshall at. 
Lancaster. 

Oct. 19 — Muhlenberg ait Allentown 

Ocl 26 — Georgetown at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

November 2— Mt. St. Mary's at 

Lebanon. 

Nov. 9 — Albright at Reading. 
Nov. 16 — Gettysburg at Gettysburg 
Nov. 23— U. S Marine Corps, Har- 
risburg. 



CUPID 



—CD- 
WINS VICTORY OVER 
L. V. ALUMNI 



The Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 
cabinets wen the first arrivals on the 
campus, coming Tuesday, Sept. 17, in 
order, to b« ready .to . receiyb: the 
Freshmen the next day and help them 
through the first stages of their ca- 
reers. A program was arranged which 
was designed to fit in with- the one 
already submitted by the faculty. In 
this way the Y's felt that "the ^Fresh- 
men would be kept busy between and 
after examinations. They would have 
no time for loneliness and incidentally 
would learn to become acquainted 
with their new life' so that they will 
be ak^e to get the best out of college 
c xperience. 

Members <ft both "Y" cabinets took 
turns waiting on tables during the 
week, so that the Freshmen had am- 
ple opportunity to learn to know these 
few old students who were back. The 
first meal, on Wednesday, noon, was 
somewhat prolonged by the singing of 
the various "pep" songs. 

Wednesday evening was the occa- 
sion of a banquet-supper in the din- 
ing hall. Members of the faculty had 
been invited to assist the Y's in enter- 
taining. The heads of the organiza- 
tions. Ruth Cooper and Fred Christ- 
man . presided. Each member of the 
cabinets was introduced and their du- 
ties explained. Dr. Gossard wel- 
comed, the new folks warmly and 
assured them of his hearty co-oper- 
ation In all their work. Mrs. Green, 
as dean of women, gave some very 
fitting suggestions as to problems to 
be expected and how best to meet 
them. Dr. Wagner spoke on plain 
"plane" toast, wandering from hi-s sub- 
ject to greet everyone and make.- -them 
feel that he is interested In students 
Continued on Page 3 ""■ 

NEW MEMBERS ADDED 
TO FACULTY GROUP 

CONSERVATORY AND BIOLOGY 
DEPARTMENT OPEN NEW 
POSITIONS 



Cupid, as usual, has been a busy 
worker among some of the members 
of our alumni, as well as one of our 
present student body. Some of the 
conquests were surprises, while others 
were only the climax of campus ro- 
mances. '. 

Miss Miriam Daugherty and Mr. 
Clarence Ulrich, of the class of 1927. 
were married Saturday September 2: 
in the United Brethren church of Eliz 
abethtown, Pa. The ceremony iwas 
performed by the bride's father, jRev. 
Joseph Daugherty. The couple Iwill 
reside at Princeton, where Mr. Ujrich 
is a Senior in the Theological Semin- 
tary. 

Among the many summer mar- 
riages was that of Miss Mabel loafer 
28, to Charles Gelbert, "29, the jwell 
known base ball players. They jwere 
married in Cumberland, Miss HaTer's 
homo town. 

Continued on Page 3 



Three new members take up their 
duties this year with our faculty. Two 
of these assume positions .recently 
created in the Department of, Biology 
and the Conservatory. The third-.mem • 
ber fills a position left vacent lasj; Junj 

Dr. V. Earl Light fills the new: posi- 
tion of Associate Professor of Biology. 
Dr. Lteht is an alumnus of :i6 and 
took his Ph. D. degree at Johns Hop- 
kins University last June.. .. 

Miss Leila Flory, graduate of the 
New England Conservatory, Boston, 
has been added to the faculty of the 
Conservatory of Music- She will 
teach Sight Singing, Dictation, and 
History in the Public School Depart- 
ment. -. . . ' 

Previous to her work at Boston, 
Miss Flory studied one year at tha 
Conservatory. She comes to us high- 
y recommended, having taught Pi- 
ano, History and Theory for four 
years at Albright College. 

(Continued on Page Ay 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1929. 



ESTABLISHED 1915 



A w««kly publication by th» Uad*r>t 
»r*duat« Student* of Lebanon 
ValUy ColUg* 



COLLEGIATE REVOLUTION 



1SITOKAL IfiTI 

Bather Anvatadt, 'SO . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladyt Knaub. *80 • 

J. Calvin Keene Associate Editor 

Q Alfred Shenk Managing Editor 

UKBXOBZAIi ITATI 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Jluth Bhroyer, '31 

Phyllis Xrone. *M 

Ruaaall Morgan, '31 • 

Genera) Reporters 
Robert L.. Raudabush. General Reporter 

aac«st» bilcnter. '30 Conservatory 

a. Edgar saroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda iiess. '30 Clloman 

urace Keener. '30 Delphian 

rhilip liarnea. "31 Kaiozetean 

Robert Rawbouser. '32 . . Philokosmian 

Edna Early. '31 

uui Liatlmer. '33 • 

Alumni Reporter* 



John W. Snyder, '3* 
Alexander Grant. '31 





business 


Manager 


Business 


Manager 



WiUlam J. Myers, '30 

".!7r. ......... . Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 
Dr. Paul A, W. Wallace. English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 



ux. VIE COLDEGIENNE. a member 
of tne Intercollegiate .Newspaper Asso 
elation of the Middle Atla ntic States. 

Subscription 11.60 P«f 

Single Copies 10 cent*) 



Entered at the Annville. Pa., post 
office as second class matter under tne 
act of March 3. 137 ». 



OUR AIMS 



At the beginning or. another school 
ytar we ail have to realize what oui 
aim* have Oeen and how tar we have 
suecteded in lealizing them in the 
course of our college career. Then, 
too, it is profitable to call the roll ot 
arguments in favor of a college course 
and try to adopt new profitable ones, 
while the newer persons are privileged 
to gain by our experience. 

It has often been argued that coi 
lege is a good place for making 
ii lends, but when we probe to the bot- 
tom of such a statement the argu- 
ment becomes weakened. When any- 
one seeks a friend for the value he 
may prove later on the seeker is do- 
ing himself a great injustice. It is 
true that friendships, formed while at 
college prove to be beneficial after 
college days pass but a friendship 
eiught as an end in Itself can never 
bloom in full. 

Were this aim reversed it would be 
one which we may all adopt. Instead 
of trying on the campus to make 
irlends we might consider the aim ot 
being a friend. On our campus thiis 
>eai we face the pleasure of sharint; 
friendship with one whose attitude i 
and problems are entirely different 
from ours. What a privileged group 
we people at Lebanon Valley are 
since we can fulfill the one great aim 
pt college life by being a friend w 
one from "Lebanon Valley in Africa." 

There la always the aim of attain- 
ing high grades. Some folks may 
think this aim should be given first 
place since the curriculum should oc- 
cupy the greater part of our time in 
college. But those of u9 who have 
fceen on the campus for several years 
realize the value of extra currlcular 
duties, when we are able to success- 
fully combine the two. No one de- 
sires to be classed as a "grind." Wo 
want to be thought of as persons who 
will be capable of taking our places 
in the world and nothing can help us 
to become fit as participation in col- 
legiate activities. 

In "What Alls Our Youth" by 
George A. Coe we find one of the out- 
standing conclusions that "an educat- 
ed man is acquainted with the major 
resources for Intellectual and aesthetic 
enjoyment. He knows nature, litera- 
ture, music, and the other arts suffi- 
ciently to choose superior to inferior 
enjoyments". After all, we have in 
that expression the Idea that an edu- 
cated man Is one who knows life. Wc 
as students want to live here on the 
campus and prepare ourselves for life 
Irter on. So let's adjust our aim* 
during our college life to our future 
r.eeds. 



Optional class attendance, college 
administrators seeking undergrad- 
uate advice, the pursuance of one 
broad subjects in all its ramification < 
instead of several unrelated ones, — 
such are some of the contemporary 
experiments in college education, 
which, as they prove their value, will 
undoubtedly revolutionize present 
college methods. 

Juniors and seniors of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina and Ree ! 
College, Oregon, have optional class 
attendance. Professors at these in- 
istitutions state that the only students 
suffering from the freedom are those 
who would not progress under any 
conditions. They further express 
their gratification at having students 
attend classes because they actuary 
have the desire. 

The president of Dartmoath Col- 
lege in 1924 asked a committee of un- 
dergraduates to criticise the educa- 
tional problems and policies of that 
school and to present their recom- 
mendations for possible changes. Most 
important of the results from this ex- 
periment was to show "the Dartmouth 
administrators that undergraduates 
could seriously consider their own 
education and make valuable recom- 
mendations/' 

Recommendations from a group of 
undergraduates at Harvard recently 
appealed so strongly to one benefac- 
tor that he subscribed $11,000,000 
toward a project the students recom- 
mended. 

Rollins College, Ficrida, divides its 
day into two hour periods. The stu- 
dent works under an instructor during 
each period, but neither listens to a 
lecture nor recites. All the work for 
each course — preparation, recitation, 
and lecture — is put into the two 
hours that a student spends on each 
of his subjects. He confers with the 
instructor when necessary, listens 
from time to time to the instructor's 
informal discussion, and if necessary, 
goes to the library for reference work 
during the period. 

"The reading period" Instituted at 
Harvard is an encouraging experi- 
ment. By this plan all students are 
turned loose from classes (except in 
the elementary courses) for two and 
a half weeks after Christmas and 
three and a half weeks before the 
spring examlnaticns in June, that 
they may read in the library. Under 
the advice of tutors recommendations 
are made for reading in connection 
with the various courses. At Prince- 
ton seniors are sometimes excused 
from certain formal course require- 
ments that they may pursue original 
work. 

Departmentalized education la 
yielding to the "correlation courses." 
Chicago University gives a correla- 
tion course "The Nature of the 
Work and Man" in which sixteen 
scientists cooperate, these men repre- 
senting different branches of learning 
but working together to give the stu- 
dent a thoughtful understanding of 
tho world in which he lives. 

The Experimental College at Wis- 
consin University, opened in 1927, Is 
probably the most daring attempt to 
revolutionize education. Here the 
faculty of twelve, with Dr. Meiklejohn 
at the head, lead the 120 students by 
instruction based upon reading, con- 
ference and discussion. Instruction 
centers about great world situations, 
such as one particular civilization. 
!Por instance, the first year's study was 
the civilization of the Fifth Century 
Athens, including its economics, poli- 
tics, art, literature, law religions, 
science, philosophy. The past year 
the civilization of America was stud- 
ied, thus placing an ancient civiliza- 
tion beside a modern one fir contrast 
and comparison. 

With experiments in liberal arts 
education on foot, it is difficult to 
foretell the type of college the next 
generation will attend. One thing is 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijj 

I Book Review | 

r?iiMiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiri<~ 

DARK STAR 



By LORNA MOON 
Reviewed by A. Q. 30 
"Dark Star" is the story of the lite 
of Nancy Pringle, the siren whosi 
pride was the dominant factor in lire 
in earliest childhood it took the form 
or a passionate desire for "a personal 
nil'," as she pi/t it, that is any piac. 
of which she could be mistress. Later 
this same pride tormented her into 
trying to find out whether her father 
was the lowly Willie Weams or Ram- 
say Gordon of the very ancient and 
noble line of the Fassaferns. Bein^ 
led to believe that there is no doubt 
about her parentage, of which the 
reader is never quite sure, she expects 
to be treated as if she is one, even if 
she is on the "left hand side." Her 
heart is broken not so much because 
her lover leaves her — she can almost 
understand his sticking to his music 
instead of marrying her, — but because 
he does not accept her giving herself 
as freely as she gave. Instead he of- 
fers her money as he would a "trull 
who must be paid." Being very sensi- 
tive she feels that if she were of 
high birth he would realize it, and 
treat her as if she were. Thus he takes 
all the beauty out of her life — the 
beauty she could keep only as long as 
she felt herself to be a Fassafei n, leav- 
ing in its place the thought that she: 
must face life as the daughter of 
Willie Weams. However, she takes 
the usual Fassafern way out of life 
and so convincing herself of her line- 
age, is happy at last 

The characters are all well drawn. 
Besides, the reader will probably find 
that they were all old friends whom he 
has met many times under various 
names. There is the sickly and 
sickening minister who is quite a bore. 
There is the usual jealous mother 
trying to steal her son's love from his 
dominant wife, both of whom are 
broken in some degree at the end. 
There is even the good old fashioned 
villain, stupid and ugly, who is, or" 
course, baffled by the heroine. 

The book seems to be an attempt at 
realism: not the stark, sordid real- 
ism that goes to extremes, but a real 
picture of people under rather ordi- 
nary circumstances. However, the 
author becomes suddenly an idealist as 
she gives us "Divot Meg". No one in 
her novel has the least shred of re- 
spect for her, yet we are supposed to 
believe with Nancy that she is at 
heart a "good woman." She could 
take her place as a perfect Christian 
lor she gets herself abused and even, 
commits murder for Nancy whom she 
has reason to hate rather than worship 
as she does. 

The story is rather good, but ex- 
ceptional only in the ending, which 
saves it from being like most of the 
light fiction being published. 

Note: This book submitted for re- 
view by K. S. Bollman, Stationer, Leb- 
anon, Pa.) 

— O— 

MRS. GREEN SPENDS SUMMER 
IN FRANCE 



Mrs. Mary C. Green and her daugh- 
ter Yvonne sailed June 15th on the 
Lapland for France where they visit- 
ed Captain Green who was engaged in 
business in Paris. During their stav 
in Parij, Madame Green and her 
daughter studied at the Sorbonne, also 
daughter studied at the Sorbonne, and 

The end of their stay i-i Paris was 
saddened by the short illness and 
death of Captain Green. 

certain, the "old order chaiirieth" in 
the face of progress. 

(This editorial based on "Revolu- 
tion in College Educational Methods 
in America" by Addison HIbbard- 
Current History, June 1S29.) 



JMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii; 

Our Coach 

rHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllllllllllllllllllllllh.' 




E. E. MYLIN 



These are the days of resurrecting 
football songs and giving "pep"' meet- 
ings for the gridiron men, but few o" 
us excepting the fellows on the squad, 
ever thing of the man behind the team 
the football coach. 

"Hooks" started hid successful 
coaching career at Lebanon Valley Ju 
the fall of 1923. These six years he 
has given unstinting service to the 
college, not only in football but also 
as basketball and baseball coach. 

His early football training was re- 
ceived at Franklin and Marshal Col- 
lege, where he received his degree in 
1916. After graduating he was coach 
of athletics in the 79th Division, A. E. 
F., in 1919, and from 1920-23 head 
coach at Iowa State College. 

"Hooks" is the only coach in Leba- 
non Valley's history to br.ng hone 
victorious teams from Brown Univer- 
sity, Dickinson, and from a smashing 
tussle with the Third Army Corps. 
This alone proves him master of h ,s 
duties. Who can witness his success 
in every phase of athletics and deny 
that he has more than proved his 
worth? 

We might ask, "How does he do 
It?" One reply might be perhaps that 
iwe are fortunate in having a man who 
can combine his thorough knowledge 
of sports as they shouid be played 
with a deep-rooted personal touch. 

It takes more than mpre knowledge 
of the inside workings of different 
sports to be able to turn out teams 
that prove a credit. Coach Mylin has 
a shrewd knoweldge of handling me.i 
that has brought him unquestionable 
success in our three competitive sports. 
— O— 

MENTION LA VIE 
TO ADVERTISERS 



RETURNING STUDENTS 
"DORMS" IMPROVED 



To aid the student body in 



have all been brightened U p 



the new year right, the dormu 

""torie, 



many improvements. The 
dorm presents quite a different 
pearance with its newly wash'' 
walls, freshly painted floors, ari(1 6(1 
pecially the new doors and i *" 
which adorn every rcom. 
last mentioned were sadly needed 
will prevent the old system f *\ 
"teaspoon key." The plumbing j n 
lavatorties has at last been cornpi et * 
and the "dorm" can boast of mode 
equipment. 

A radical change has taken p i a J 
m the "Y" room. In s-ome mystertou! 
way the piano has b^en tuned and 
repaired so that it really prod UCe , 
something which approaches rnusio 
Furthermore, the furniture has beer 
revarnished. All in all, the men !g 
dorm is "dressed up" for the opening 
of school. 

North and South Halls have a i s 
been improved by the addition of new- 
window shades and screens. Floors 
have been repainted and furniture re- 
varnished. The women's rooms haw 
also been repapered. 

Lastly, a big improvement has bean 
irangurated in the dinin:; ball; a new 
method of dismissing the tables sepa- 
rately after a given time is now in 
use. By means of this new system 
there is none of the old hurry art<i 
rush formerly found in the dining 
hall. This system should do away 
with student congestion and indiges- 
tion. 

— O-. 

ALL SOCIETIES JOIN IN FRIDAY 
PROGRAM 



Friday evening at 8 o'clock in En- 
gle Hal] will mark the inauguration 
of a new custom on our campus. The 
plan is to introduce the four society 
to the new students at a combined 
session. Clio, Delphian, Kalo and 
Philo are putting forth their best ef- 
forts for the entertainment of every- 
one. A most cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to faculty and students, nevf 
and old, to attend. 

— O— 

SENIORS VOTE FOR 1ST TERM 
OFFICERS 



The Senior class have chosen the- 
following officers, for the first term: 
President, William Meyers; Vice 
President, Warren Burtner; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, Mary Showers; 
Recording Secretary, Josephine Yeich; 
Treasurer Homer Allwein; and Stu- 
dent-Faculty Council Representative 
John Snyder. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, F*» 



KREAMER BROS. 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 
328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 - Annville, P* 



Shaeffer's Lfetime Pens — 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

HARPEL'S 

(absolutely guaranteed) 



The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1929. 



PAGE THREL 




COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES* 

—JONATHAN SWIFT. 



JOE DAWGONE RETURNS 

You see above Old "Joe" Dawgone again hanging- out his "dorm" wi 
dow trying to pick, up with his telescope any choice pieces of campus 
"dirt". Now there isn't much dirt as yet, with everybody relaxing after 
vacations and keeping pretty quiet. However, Old "Joe" D. has been able 
to make for us the following telescopic observations: 

MISSING AT L. V. 

Seventy-three Seniors, of '29, Mi^s Enele at Wtest Hall. ^ vjorn, 23 
pounds belonging to Ruth March, 9 "boy friends", 3 "girl friends." the lonv; 
tresses of Mary Snyder and Gladys Hershey, Sunny Russel's "little bit of 
heaven," and the Siamese twins. 

ADDITIONS AT L. V. 

The hope of 1933, Baby Stevenson 6 moustaches, Mrs. Bender, 9 College 
Widows, 2 barrels of varnished splashed freely throughout the "dorms", 2,000 
rolls (more or less) of wall paper. 



-LVC— 



Professor Light: Say frosh, give me a Blue Book. 
Frosh: Give this freshman a Blue Book. 



— LVC — 

INFORMAL DIRECTORY OF WHAT'S 
AND VICINITY 



WHAT IN ANNVILLE 



(For Frosh Only) 

Romig's — Haven of after-dinner d inners. Here food is served in elegant 
style on clean silver plates. Recommerded as "date" exchange. 

Colonial Theatre, Lebanon. Co-eds and eds hold their reunions here 
every week. (Gallery only two bits.) 

Along the Quittie: The haven for those who are in love. (For mor e 
details ask Violet or Fred.) 

Post Office: The destination of 'he big after dinner parade. 



"Rats' 
stinct. 



— LVC— 

Bovina is moving down to South Hall to develop his social in- 
—LVC— i 



^IlilllllllllllUIIHHIUIUIHIIIIiMUJllltlllllllllfittllliniltMlr^s 

| Alumni Notes 

~iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiuiiiimuitiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

With the return of school time two 
oi our aiumni who intend to become 
ministers, Mr. Byron Sheetz and Mr 
John Behney, have returned to Bone- 
brake Seminary for their second 
year's work. 

With a great deal of sorrow \ 
learned of the death of one of oui 
Alumni, Miss Emma I. Boyer. 

Aliss Boyer was graduated from the 
Leading High School in 1915 and from 
Lebunan Valley in 1919. She then took 
advanced work at Columbia Univer 
sity and received her M. A. in 1927 
For the past six years she had been 
teaching science in the Southern Jun 
ior High School, Reading. She died 
July 12th in the Reading Hospital 
after an operation. Miss Boyer was 
also a great church worker in the Sa 
lem United Brethren church, of 
Reading. Her home was in West 
Leesport, ten miles northwest of Read 
ing. 

Dr. Howerd E. Enders is now head 
(of the department of Biology at Pur- 
Idue University, Lafayette, Indiana 
ince the resigna ion of Dean Stanley 
Conlter in 1926. 

/During the summer of 1926 he was a 
ember of a sciertific expedition to 
Panama, acting as head zoologist of 
the expedition. 

Dr. George N. Hotter has recently 
k en appointed education promotion- 
directdr of tha Potash Importing 
Corporation in charge of the Mid- 
dle Western States with headquarters 
t Lafayette, Indinana. 

— O— 

CLASSES AT REED 



Scene:— Room 20, "A" Building. 

Time:— 2:30 P. M. Tuesday, Sept. 17, 1929. 

Audience: Y M. & Y. W. C- A. abinets. 

The Cast (in order of appearance) . 

' 'Pete' Inqualls, the 'Y' leader. 

'Cal' Keene, leading man. 

'Bill' Myers. 

Mr. Barnhart. 

ACT I. 

Pete*— (after a knock on the door) "Come In— it's free!" 
Keene'— (walks in,— blushes— blushes) (another knock) 
Myers— "Come— it's free." j 
Mr. Barnhart— "Someone is wanted at the office." 
Moral— We Scotchman must stick together! 

T * ie cla ss of '29 sure sent us a large delegation over the week-end but 
a Pe Nuts, there's a reason! or rather there were reasons! 

— LVC— 

Su ^ 11Vft Wel «le ha* learned much about "collapsible" coupes during the 
ler "Buck," we hear was the chauffeur. 



The 



— LVC— 

Plumbing experts of the Men's "Dorm" are doing a good business 
° w ing the "green" crop. | 



—LVC— 



"Do 



Fl> osh examining West Hall "date book" to Miss Myers leaving hall, 
y°u want to sign up?" 



President Coleman of Reed College 
Oregan, says, "We do not compel the 
student to listen to us (faculty). We 
Ido not mark class attendance and we 
lhave no system ox cuts, excuses, pen- 
alties. As a matter of fact it is not 
uncommon to find groups of upper- 
class students carrying on discussions 
and investigations with no teacher 
present. When I have asked such a 
;roup where their teacher was, the 
(reply has been, "Oh, he is within 
(reach ; we can And him if we need 
him." 

— O— 

STORK BRINGS BABY GIRL TO 
STEVENSONS 

There is a new addition to the fac- 
ulty to whom so far the student body 
hae not been prol erly introduced. 
Dr. and Mrs. Eugene Stevenson are 
announceing the birth of a daughter, 
Margeret on July 26. Both Mrs. 
Stevenson and her daughter are en- 
joying the best of health. 

— O— 

CUPID WINS VICTORY 

OVER L. V. ALUMNI. 

(Continued from Page 1) 



U Y H CABINETS ARE 

HOSTS OF FROSH WEEK 

(Continued from Page 1) 

and their work. Dr. Wallace's witty 
speech on "cinnamon toast" made the 
new students see that our facluty 
really interested in us personally and 
not only here to deliver a series 
lectures in the classroom. Olive 
Weigel in her "crisp toast" added more 
helpful thoughts and plenty of the 
humorous element. "Bobbie" Rouda- 
bash very appropriately spoke on 
' dry toast" which proved to be any 
thing but dry. 

Later that evening everyone met on 
North Hall porch to have a pep meet- 
ing "Just Among Ourselves." Songs 
were sung and learned. "Dusty 
Rhoads, Alcesta Slichter, and Ruth 
Cooper gave some interesting idea; 
ton "What would I look for in Col 
lege Life if I were at the beginning 
of the 4-year course." These thoughts 
were helpful in bringint out new 
deas along that line in the minds 
of the Freshmen. 

For Thursday afternoon a "hike 
supper" was planned. In arriving at 
tne camp Are, Alcesta Slichter took 
charge of singing which enlivened 
everyone so that they were ready for 
the "eats". After everyone was sat 
itfieg entirely in that special respect 
Bernita Strebig, social chairman, pre- 
sided. Several talks and stunts, in- 
cluding a few remarks from the chap- 
ercnes, Miss Louise Fencil and Prof. 
Fields, made new folks feel a little 
more as though they belonged here. 
Madeline Rife then took charge of the 
devotional part which closed by form- 
ing the ever impressive friendship 
circle. 

After the hike home, separate dis- 
cussions were held in North Hall and 
the Men's Dormitory for the purpose of 
arousing new thoughts in the minds 
of the Freshmen and to help them sec 
up Ideals which will guide them 
through their four years here without 
breaking under a strong test. 

Quiet and the spirit of worship pre- 
vailed during the two student-direct- 
ed chapel services held Thursday and 
Friday morning for the Freshmen. 
Ruth Cooper presided the first morn- 
ing with Mildred Myers playing soft 
music on the organ during the entir? 
service. A choir behind the scenes 
added beauty and sacredness to the 
hymns. Calvin Keenen led in prayer 
with the choir chanting responses 
Sacred music was played as a reces- 
sional. 

Fred Christman tock charge the 
second morning in a service somewhat 
similar. John Snyder gave some 
•worthwhile thoughts which proved ad- 
vice for both old and new students. 
The new students were very receptive 
and the*"Y*s" proved themselves cap- 
able leaders. 



Y. W IMPRESS WITH OPENING 
PROGRAM 

The first Sunday evening Y. W. 
service for the new girls was very 
impressive. The program was in th« 
charge of Madeline Rife and held in 
North Hall parlor at 5:45 o'clock. 

A piano prelude was played by Al- 
cesta Schlicter, following v. hich a hid- 
den quartette sang "The 1/ord is in 
His Holy Temple." These two very 
beautiful musical numbers created a 
worshipfu attitude in all he girls. 

The talk was given by Miss Rif.» 
She used the first four words in the 
Bible — "In the beginning, God" — show- 
ing the girls that at this beginning ■»/ 
their college year they should think 
of God. 

Pauline Schaeffer then talked of 
Art, which has been used by artists 
and poets to express thpir deepest 
feelings. God was the greatest of a 1 ' 
artists and poets, and He ii. spired men 
to write, of which the most beautiful 
are the Biblical writings. 

The third talk of th« evening was 
by Grace Keener. She ^ave three 
proofs that there is a God — The Bi- 
ble, Conscience, and Nature, which is 
God's own temple. 

A quartette then sang "Day is Dy- 
ing in the West". This lovely twi- 
light song was made exceptionally im- 
pressive by the humming of the last 
verse. 

Ruth Cooper, in the closing 
speech, showed that nature, art, 
poetry, and music are nothing with- 
out God. In our college life we'll find 
discouragements, we'll meet those 
who sneer, we'll be lonely but let us. 
too, find God in all things, remember- 
ing that "In the beginning, God.** 

A Friendship Circle was formed 
The girls first prayed for the one oa 
the left, then for the one on the right, 
and last gave a prayer for themselves. 
A closing prayer was given by Ruth 
Cooper. 

— O— 



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Specializing on High Grade 
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Dominic Russo. Prop. 



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OCCASIONS 
CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

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Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 
Annrill* _ «... Pa. 



Palmer Poff, of Dallastown, class of 
1929, announced during the summer 
that he had been married the pre- 
vious Easter morning. 

Stanley Piela, of the same class, was 
married June 13 to Miss Margaret 
Berrier, of Lebanon, in the Zion Luth- 
eran church, of that city. 

On Saturday, August 17, Foster 
Ulrich, of the present Senior class, was 
married to Miss Helen BaLmer. The 
ceremony was part of a double wed- 
ding performed in the First Presby- 
ter? a church, of Harrisburg. 

— O— 

MEN'S SENATE TAKE 

OATH OF OFFICE 

The members of the Men's Senate 
were officially installed at chapel on 
Thurs. morning. In the basence of Dr. 
Gosard because of illness, Prof. Ging- 
richadministered the oath. The men 
have actually been in office since the 
opening of school, but since the ad- 
ministering of the oath they are now 
a legal body on th© campus. 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE p. a 

A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
Collet* Text Books and Hi*h Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawa Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 

EAST MAIN STREET. 



ANNVILLE. PA 



IPAGE FOUR 



LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1929. 



FRESHMEN ASPIRE TO 

MANY POSITIONS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Teachers are by far in the mi«,jor 
ity. This list includes Leslie Armor, 
John Beam, Martin Bricker, Charle i 
Buynoski, Ruth Coble, Agnes Cole- 
man, Chester Dechert, Gretna Draw- 
baugh, Elivra Ebersole, Helen Ediy, 
Anna Engle, Kathryn Engle, Robei ■ 
English, Marion Eshleman, Ma-- 
Fauth, Edith Fields, Helen Franklin, 
Richarr" Funk, Kathryn Gockley, Ar - 
na Gohn, Flo Grim, Dorothy Hartz. 
Arline Heckrate, Gerald Heilman, L j 
ella Hoilman, Norman Hemperly, Vera 
Hoffer, Miriam Hotland, Harvey Hort 
Robert Isett, William Jacks, Rebecca 
Keller, Fred Klein, Amos Knis'.oy, 
Trula Koch, Gloria Lavantine, Kat* - 
ryn Leisly, Richard Look, Kat!i- 
ryn Lutz, Harriet Miller, Miriam MS • 
ler, Helen Muth, Carl Meyers, T 7aroVi 
Peiffer, Leonard Schrope, Edwa d 
Shellenberger, Lloyd Shirk, Miriam 
Sylvius, Wiliam Speg, Ernest Surang 
er, W;iliam Swope, John Trronis, Au- 
gustus Tracht, Gladys Wagner, Ste '.i 
Wolfe, George Wood, Helen Yieng-.t. 
and John Zerby. 

Medicine claims a large proportion, 
and among the future doctors we find 
Lester Bixler, Helen Boyer, Woodrow 
Bellinger, Charles Fellows, Richard 
Fenstermacher, William Focht, Jam,--; 
Frantz, Horace Hoilman, Matthev 
Karnich, Albert Kozlusky, Nelson 
Newcomer, Gardner Sayior, Gera 
White, and Mary Stephens. 

Among the business men are Wil- 
liam ' Barnes, Edgar Brinser, Claule 
Donmoyer, Elizabeth Keister, Chari:j 
Kraybill and Fred Morrison. 

Journalism is the future professi >n 
of Lemuel Clements, Clarence Earley 
Marion Kruger, Walter Krumbiege! 
and Mildred May. 

Some future ministers are Paul 
Emenhieser, John Eshleman, Chester 
Goodman, Melvin Patrick, Harry TV 
bian, Grant Umberger, Stuart Wernftv 
and Hary Zech; while Helen Kauff- 
man and Joe Rettew will be mission 
aries. 

. The musicians -will be Almn Clark 
Robert Lindsey, George Sallade, and 
Theodore Walker. 

John Atkins expects to he a dentist. 
William Ehrgott a chemist and Ken- 
neth Waughtel, a druggist. 

The lawyers are Frank Fernsler, 
- Ben- Geyer, and Charles Oliver, 

Russell Henne wants to be an avia 
tor, and Elamma Krause a librariar 

The following are undecided and ar 
taking the regular college t.j>i'rse: Ar- 
thur Ayers, Isaac Ebling, Dorothv 
Forry, Luther Saylor, Lee Krunbine, 
and Sam TJlrich. 

— O— 

MYLIN PRIMES SQUAD 

FOR. FIRST TUSSLE 

i (Continued from Page 1) 
The baekfield material seems very 
promising as the line for the same 
backnelds as last year will be avail- 
able. Albright at quarterback, Capt. 
•Zappla and Daub at half backs and 
Nye at fullback is a veteran combin- 
ation. In the second baekfield Pa- 
trizio at quarter and Light at halfback 
are veterans while Stewart and Swope, 
a Freshman, complete this quartet. 
Sipe, Bowman and English will per- 
form on the varsity before the sea- 
son is very old. Sips played a great 
game against Penn State last year 
until he was forced to quit on account 
of a broken ankle. 

Every memebr of the squad is in 
good physical condition at present 
Mylln was assisted in the early train 
ing by Mackert, former Lebanon Val- 
ley star, who paid particular atten- 
tion to the developing of the line. 
'The team is all primed to give Vil- 
lanova the biggest surprise of t\e 
year. 

— -O— 

FRCSH EXAMS SHOW 

FUTURE CAPACITIES 

lontinued irom Pa .0 1 1 
Although it is possible that to 
the Freshmen this elaborate program 
of tests seemed rather tedious, thfy 
will come to realize later in the year 
the true value of such a Freshman 
period. 



CLASS OF '29 PURSUE 

TEACHING, BUSINESS 

(Continued trom P'.u-! ij 
Leah Harpel, Pleasant ville, N J. 
Carl Heiman — Cape May, N. J. 
Mariam Hershey — Peachbottom, Pa. 
Marion Hoffman — Cornwall, Pa. 
Esther Kauffman— Saltillo, Pa. 
Miles Kiehner — Glen Rock, Pa. 
Dorothy Kleinfelter — Rothsville, Pa. 
Allen Klinger — Gouldsboro, Pa. 
Mildred Lane — Lodi, N. J. 
Edna Lang — Batimore, Md. 
Ruth Light — Lebanon, Pa. 
Jennie B. Lutz — Edison Jr. H. S., 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
L. Archie Lutz — Allentown, Pa- 
Elizabeth Matthes — Reading, Pa. 
C. Lanston Mentzer — Frevorton, Pa. 
Florence Miller, Columbia, Pa. 
Irene Miller — Annville High School. 
Janet Miller — Clinton, N. J. 
Miriam Muth — Highspire, Pa. 
Stanley Piela — Brown Prep. School, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Palmer Poff — West York, Pa. 
Ruth Reigel — Hummelstown, Pa. 
Irene Schrope — Auburn, Pa. 
Emmaline Schaffer — Millersburg, 
Pa. 

Ruth Strubhar — Mt. Penn, Pa. 
Martin Thomas — Harrisburg, Pa. 
Mary Thomas — Harrisburg, Pa. 
Nancy Ulrich — Closter, N. Y. 
Mildred Umholtz — Sacramento, Pa. 
Kathryn Wengert — Jonestown, Pa. 
Maynard Wilson — Petersboro, Pa. 
Howard Wentz — Springfield, Pa. 
The thirteen who are continuing in 
other schools are: 

Ann Apgar — Johns Hopkins U. 
Henry Aungst — Columbia U. 
William Blatt — Bonebrake Semi- 
nary. 

Dominic Calabrese — Georgetown U. 
Lawrence Derickson — U. of Pitts 
burgh. 

Baynard Louis Hammond — Johns 
iHopkins U. 

Frances Hammond — Johns Hop- 
kins U. 

Jane Fearnow — Chicago U. 
Paul Hunter — Bonebrake Seminary. 
Andrew Laurie — George Washing- 
ington U. 

Forrest W. Miller— U. of Pittsburgh. 
Fredrio Miller— U. of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Russel Oyer — Bonebrake Seminary. 
Fannie Silber— New York U. 
Those in business are: 
Enos Detweiler— S. S.Kresge Co. 
Arba Disney — Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Earl Donmoyer — Fidelity Trust Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mae Hamer — Victor Talking Ma- 
chine Co., Camden, N. J. 

Ira Mottei— A. T. and T. Co., New 
York City. 

George Snyder — Equitable Life As- 
surance Society. 

Wayne Sparrow — Bell Tel. Co. of Pa. 
The chemists are: 
Harry Hovis — Hamilton Watch Co. 
Donald Eberly— Armstrong Cork 



"Y" RECEPTION OPENS 

CAMPUS SOCIAL LIFE 

(.Continued :i 111 i j age 



Jji. G. JL>. Uossa.ru as president oi 
j-.. V. C. gave an appropriate talk es- 
pecially directed towards the new 
stuuents. 

Immediately following him, Mrs. 
iSiary C. Green spoKe £01 a few min- 
utes on the purposes 01; college lite. 

Ur R. R. Butterwick, ciiuirman ami 
au visor of Y. M. C. A., was the lasL 
speaker 

A pageant entitled "Follow the 
U-e&m" was the feature tf the evei. 
ing. All phases of college life were 
dealt with and discussed. Ruth 
CoOper, president of Y. W. C. A., and 
Fred Christman, acting president 01 
Y. M. C. A., eloquently brought out 
the thought of following the gleam. 

Miss Olive W"eigel as 1 resident of 
Women's Student Government Asso- 
ciation, gave her speech in behalf of 
ithat body which she represents. 

Calvin Keene, vice-president of 
Alen's Senate, in the absence of the 
president, Roy Albright, welcomed to 
L. V C. all the new students. 

Music on the orthophonic completed 
the entertainment in the ( hapel. 

The students and faculty then de- 
parted for the gymnasium where re- 
freshments were served by the Sopho- 
more girls. 

— o— 
DR. GOSSARD ILL 

Dr. Gossard has been ill at his home 
for the last few days with a heavy 
cold. His conditionnow, however, is 
uning to improve. 



COLLEGE CALENDER 



iiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiUiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiuinmiiiimiitii. = 

Sept. 27 — Combined session of Clio 
Delphian, Kalo, Philo in cuapel at 
8 P. M. 

Sept. 28 — L. V. vs. Villanova a; Vil- 
lanova. 

Sept. 2— Y. W. at r :45 P. M. in North 
Oct. 1 — Student Prayermeeting. 
Hall. 

Oct. 2 — Annual class scrap between 
Sophs and Fiosh. 

— o— 

NEW MEMBERS ADDED 

TO FACULTY GROUP 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Miss Louise Fencil succeeds Miss 
Chapman as Director of the Wb- 
men's Department of Physical Educa- 
tion. She is a graduate of Tempk 
University, having spent her last two 
years there. During lur Freshman 
and Sophomore years she attended 
Lebaonn Valley College. It is there- 
fore to no new school that she begin? 
her teaching creer. She is also a grad- 
iate of Annville High School, being a 
esident of this town. 
During this summer Mirs Fencil at- 
tended Columbia University wnere she 
took further work in physical educa- 
tion, her chosen field. She is indeed 
competent to undertake the responsi- 
ble task of coaching the girls of L. V. 
C. and of developing her department. 



PRINTING 




Co. 

Charles Troutman— Bethlehem Steel 
Co. 

Russel Bechtel is the minister 
Charles Gelbert is playing baseball 
with the St. Louis Cardinals. 

— O— 

BISHOP SPEAKS AT 

OPENiNG SERVICE 

(Continued from Page 1) 
^outh, he said, is always optimestic 
iiid hopeful, yet sometimes is fearful 
of the outcome. He assured us that 
no task is too difficult and we should 
1 oi\nt no effort spent too great for the 
strength that is ours. He challenged 
our faith — told us to risk anything and 
in darkness, walk in our faith. Time- 
ly illustrations made his words full o 
meaning and emphasis. We are not 
only here to study, says Bishop Bat 
clorf, but to learn to live a life ahead 
and while here, to build a character 
so that when we get out we can mak 
of the knowledge we gained here, a rea> 
contribution to the world, thus living 
a life of service. But, in everything 
. e must have faith. 

The students, faculty, many par 
ents, and a host of friends filled ou 
chapel to its capacity to hear the for 
mal opening of school. 



PUBLICATION, 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
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ETC. 

ANNYILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA. 



NOTICE 
Superior Quality Always Leads 
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STORE 

51 West Main St., 
Annville, Pa. 
Watch and Clock Repairing 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
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KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, P». 



^iiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiium,,,,,^ 
I L V. 15 YEARS AGO | 
iiniiiiiiiiiiiiimtiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiuiiiiuiiiii| HHu J 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

DISCUSS eD 



all 



On Friday afternoon a meeting f 
women of the college was held 
meeting was held in the interests j 
self- government. Miss Mary Dough 
■erty was elected preident protempo re 
Miss Helen Brightbill ex '15, now 
method of self government as u se , 
at Vassar. At that institution the 
procter system is used with great 
success. Miss Seaman told about self 
government at a co-ed educatiorm' 
cojllege. She expressed her opinion 
that the plan would work well at L. y 
From "College News" 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SMASH THE NITTANY 
LIONS! PENN STATE 
VS. L. V. OCT. 5 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1929 



NUMBER 2 



INTER-SOCIETY NITE 
ENTEitTAINS FtlUSH 



FIRST COMBINED PROGRAlv 
PROVES SUCCESSFUL 
EXPERIMENT 



A new custom was established on 
the campus this year when the four 
Literary Societies effected their for- 
mal opening Friday evening in the 
Kng le Conservatory. At that time 
I'hilos, Delphians, Kalos, and Clios 
joined in welcoming all new students 
mt0 their midst while they gave a 
short display of local talent. 

Rev. U. E. Apple, pastor of the 
First Lutheran church, was the first 
entertainer of the evening and he 
started the ball rolling with his usual 
crisp remarks. Then the programs of 
the societies started with a snappy 
send off by the president of the Philo- 
kosmian Literary Society, Luther 
Rearick, who acted as master of cere- 
monies during the performances of his 
fellow Philos. 

Philo in "Being Ourselves" 

The theme of the Philo program, 
"Being Ourselves," was extremely 
well emphasized and the fellows suc- 
ceeded in acting natural and putting 
the audience at ease. After the presi- 
dent's witty remarks the audience we! 
corned the Philo entertainers win 
blended wit, song, and dramatics with 
a touch of seriousness into their fea- 
lures. The Philos closed their part of 
the performance with a skit featuring 
"Barney" and "Skee", unassisted by 
the four Marx brothers, in "The Coo 
Coo Nuts". 

(Continued on Page 3) 

O 

T PLANS OCTOBER 
UONFAB FOR CAMPUS 



PROMINENT MEN WILL DIS 
CUSS LIFE PROBLEMS 
WITH STUDENTS 



The Y's are again living up to their 
iofty ideals and aspirations to serve 
others by planning a great fall con 
lererrce to be held on our own cam 
Pus where nationally known speaker 
an d leaders will address and meet 
Personally all our students. The 
thought of the conference will be 
w °ven around "Finding One's Self", a 
t'tle which was chosen after the re 
suits of the Questionnaire conducted 
as t year in chapel were carefully con 
S'dered. 

The leaders secured with the aid of 
Ingles, the "Y" Secretary, are 
nien w h have had experience along 
le hne with which they are to deal 
^ s Pecially ; and are willing to come 
^ ere and share their advanced ideas 
r the pure love of aiding bewilderc 
y °uth to find their right place in Liff 
J The week-end of Oct. 25-26-27 w' 11 
^ the occasion of this wonderful op- 
jg^tunity for our students to share in 
T P er 'ences similar to those formerly 
0v ed as far fom us as Eagles Mere 
" d Buckhill Falls. Friday morning 
a Pel sevices of that week will be the 
(Continued on Page 4) 



oENIOR CLASS SENDS 

80 P. C. TO CLASSROOivtS 



This year's class of practice teach- 
ers is the largest class to have gone 
rom Lebanon Valley to teach in the 
Annville High School since the sys- 
tem was inaugurated seven years ago. 
There will be sixty-three novices 
teaching during the year, which is 
over eighty per cent of the Senioi 
class. 

It is the plan of the departmen: to 
assign to the neophytes his or her 
major subject, and if that is not pos- 
sible, his or her minor subject, so tha. 
the experience gained will be of true 
teaching value. Especial effort has 
been taken this year to adjust the 
practice teaching periods so that the 
collegiate programs of the student 
teachers do not conflict with their 
high school periods. 

It is interesting to note that there 
will be three times as many womei 
teaching the first semester as men, the 
count being 21 to 7. 

O— 



MEN'S SENATE GOVERN 
WITH REVISED RULES 

PUBLIC MEETINGS OF BODY 
ARE PART OF CHANGES 
IN CONSTITUTION 



The new Men's Senate, formally in- 
stalled by Professor Gingrich at the 
chapel exercises last Thursday morn- 
ing, will inaugurate the newly revised 
constitution of the senate. 

Under the new methocs to be used 
this year, the major offences are to be 
rigidly enforced, the senate meetings 
are to be open to the public, and all 
charges must be handed to the senate 
in writing together with the name of 
the person making the charge. Trials 
will follow court procedure and the 
accused may select a defender. 

It is expected that this new sys- 
tem will do away with some of the 
pitfalls formerly experienced, and wid 
raise the standards of student govern- 
ment. Mr. Albright, the president of 
the senate, in a speech to the men of 
the student body after installation, 
asked the cooperation of the fellows 
in conducting a successful school year, 
and added particulars on the new sys- 
tem. 

A box has been installed in the "Y" 
room of the dormitory in which the 
cards bearing the charges can be de- 
posited. 

O 

DR. DERICKSON IS 

TAKING YEAR'S REST 



COEOS PROFIT BY 



CHANGE IN RULE* 



W. S. G. A. ADVANCES PRIV- 
ILEGES FOR ALL CLASSES 
ON CAMPUS 



A number ot changes have been 
made in the rules and regulations 
governing the behavior of the girls in 
the dormitories. More privileges are 
being allowed, which are howevei. 
only established on a trial basis. 
The success of these changes 
lies entirely with the girls. The 
revisions were made by the board 
with the aid of the Dean of women, 
were approved by the faculity, and fin- 
ally voted on by the Student Govern- 
ment Association. 

Some of the revisions are as fol- 
lows; 

Senior Privileges: 

Girls together may be downtown 
any night in the week until 8:00 
P. M. 

Dates: Any night in the week un- 
til 8:00 P. M. (girls may not inter- 
tain in dormitories during the week), 
Saturday nights from 7:00 to 10:00 
P. M. , Sunday nights to church, re- 
turning at 8:30 P. M. Calling hour 
is 3:00 P. M. for Saturday and Sun- 
day afternoons. 

Seniors may go out of town over 
any week-end providing they sign the 
registration slips and register with 
the Dean of Woman. 

Seniors may have one 12 o'clock 
permission and one 1 1 :30 permission 
a week subject to the approval of the 
Dean of Woman. 

One Senior couple may go to Leb- 
anon. 

After April 1st Seniors may enter- 
tain men Wednesday and Sunday 
evenings until 10:00 P. M. 

. (Continued on Page 2) 

O 

SHOOTERS ARE FITTED 

WITH NEW EQUIPMENT 



I) 



On account of his ill health, Dr. 
.erickson, acting upon his physician's 
advice, has decided to rest this year. 
This means, of course, that he will not 
meet any of his classes. 

At present Dr. Derickson is spend- 
ing his time at his cottage at Mt. 
Gretna. Although his health will no' 
permit him any great activity, he is 
still studying and still has the prog- 
ress of the school at heart. 

The students who knew him ar 
very sorry that he is not back on the 
campus, but are glad that he may fee 1 
.sure that his place is capably filled 
by Dr. V. Earl Light, who was for- 
merly one of his best students. 



DR. SHENK ADDRESSES 

OKLAHOMA INDIANS 



Dr. H. H. Shenk, professor ot 
history at Lebanon Valley College, 
and also State Archivist of Public 
Records at Harrisburg has just return- 
ed from a motor trip to Oklahoma 
where he delivered an address and 
carried a mission to the Delaware 
Indians at the eservation in Dewey 
in the interests of his Harrisburg 
position. After a few days at this 
place, he left for the east again, fol- 
lowing a different route t^ian that 
taken going west. 

Dr. and Airs. H. H. Shenk return- 
ed Sunday from their trip which took 
them through Ohio and the Midwest, 
having visited tfriends and relates 
in Kansas as well as attending to Dr. 
Shenk's business in Oklahoma. 

Dr. Shenk met his class in Ameri- 
can History according to schedule on 
Monday. 

They were accompanied as far as 
Pittsburgh by M5ss Lucille Shenk, 
'24 and Mr. Lawrence Derickson, '29, 
who are at present taking graduate 
burgh. 

STAR COURSE SHOWS 
VARIETYIN FEATURES 

MUSIC AND DRAMA ARE HIGH 
LIGHTS OF COURSE 
OPENING OCT. 28 



WILDCATS DOWN L V. 
WITH 32-13 SCORE 

LOCAL BOYS SHOW PROMISE 
IN GRID PREMIER 
AT VILLANOVA 



Members of the rifle club are pre- 
paring for another busy season. A 
meeting will be held in the near fu- 
ture to elect new officers and to decide 
whether or not Lebanon Valley will 
enter the intercollegiate matches. Last 
year the team made a weak showing 
m this competition but it was due part- 
ly to the fact that the members were 
not equipped with first class rifles. 
This year new Springfield 22's with 
the special micrometer sights have 
been secured from the War Depart- 
ment and with the acquisition of these 
rifles better scores should be made and 
the team meet with greater success. 

Besides shooting matches at close 
ranges of 50 and 75 feet, the club will 
take several trips to Mount Gretna 
where the regular army rifle is used 
in shooting on the National Guard 
range. 



LA VIE APOLOGIZES 

Miss Mabel Hafer and Charles 
Gelbert were not married last sum- 
mer as announced last week. They 
have, however, announced their 
engagement. 



Probably the first chapel event of 
importance in this school year will be 
the opening Star Course program to 
be held Monday evening, October 28th, 
in the Conservatory. These programs 
are sponsored by the Y. M. and Y. W 
C A. as a source of entertainment for 
the student body in general. The com 
mittee asks for the whole-hearted sup 
port of every student. 

The entertainers for the first night 
will be the John Ross Reed Company. 
John Ross Reed who is a world fam- 
ous baritone, recording artist and an 
actor, heads the band of singers who 
will entertain us with delightful mu 
sic. The program includes such pop- 
ular offerings as scenes from "Madame 
.Butterfly," "The Pagoda of Flowers," 
(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

CLASS OFFICERS FOR 

FIRST TERM CHOSEN 



Although Lebanon Valley was un- 
successful in her opening encounter 
with Villanova at Villanova Satur- 
day, our team put up a sturdy de- 
fense. The white jerseyed represent- 
atives of L. V. made a fine showing 
against the more experienced Wild- 
cat team, coning out of the skirmish 
with a score of 13-32 Many weak- 
esses were evident in the defense 
and the offense failed to click pro- 
erly at certain times, but such con- 
ditions are generally present in the in- 
tial encounters. Followers of the 
team feel confident the boys will be 
going in top form by the time they 
tackle F. and M. 

VETS IN GOOD FORM 

Bartlett, Lechthaler and Heller 
were the bulwark of the Lebanon 
Valley line. These three boys are 
playing their second year on the var- 
'sity and showed a world of improve- 
ment in their playing over last year. 
In the third quarter Heller jumped 
high in the air between a pass and 
raced for the first Lebanon Valley 
touchdown. A pass to Daub netted 
the extra point. 

In the fourth quarter Sweeney 
Light, who had replaced Daub, inter- 
cepted a forward pass and Taced 85 
yards for a touchdown. Through- 
out, the game the brunt of the ball 
toting fell to Nye and Daub. These 
two backs played a great game and 
were responsible for the majority of 
the Lebanon Valley gains. 

(Continued on Page 3) 
O 



GIRLS RESUME THEIR 
CAMPUS ATHLETIC 



DIRECTRESS SCHEDULES 
BOTH HOCKEY AND ARCHERY 
FOR FALL SPORTS 



At an important business meeting, 
Monday, Sept. 23, the Sophomore 
Iclass elected their officers for the first 
semester. It was a contested election 
\with the following results: Allen 
Shortledge, president; Ruth Shroyer, 
vice-president; John Morris, treasurer, 
and Robert Rawhouser, financial sec 
retary. The officers recently electee 
promised a busy and successful term 

The Junior class recently elected 
their officers to lead them during the 
first half of the year. The forunatr 
ones are: Alexander Grant, presi 
dent; Margaiet Young, vice-president 
Mary Stager, secretary; Dean Sallada 
treasurer, and Sara Ensminger finan 
fcial secretary. 

Not to be outdone by their riva 
classes, the Juniors expect to ha- • - 
unusual year, both, financially and 
socially. 



In a few weeks, girls' athletics un- 
der the coaching of Miss Louise Fen- 
cil, will be formally launched. Hockey 
and archery will be first begun, with 
the possibility of some tennis. Later 
on, the ever popular sport, basket- 
ball, will be the feature of the girls' 
athletics. 

Because of the physical examina- 
tions which every Freshman girl is 
required to take before the physical 
/education studies can be started, the 
/girls get a short vacation from hock- 
ey and archery. The regulation out- 
fit of Lebanon Valley College which 
was adopted last year will be seen on 
all of the new girls, and also on the 
students of last year's Freshman 
class. 

Dr. Polk is once more the compe- 
tent Teacher of Hygiene, which sub.. 
ject has now become a required 
course in the school. She has been 
busily engaged in giving every Fresh- 
man girl a thorough examination. No 
(Continued on Page 3) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 192a. 



ICa ¥u (&alk$unns> 

ESTABLISHED 1925 

A. weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAJTI 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chi 
Gladys Knaub. '30 

J.; Calvin Keene ...... Associate Editor. 

C.j Alfred Shenk Managing Editor Course committee, a branch of the 

bepobtokial stapp I cabinets, is planning to bring here 

KuTh re sh?oy?r l ! r %f ; . : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : m <> nthl y cha f> el speakers W ho w»i 

Phyllis Trone', '32 discuss economic, international, racial 

Russell Morgan, '31 

Genera) Reporters 
Robert L. Raudabush, General Reporter 



The questions discussed will be those 
deeded upon by the students last 
spring: How to form a philosophy of 
life; Finding one's place in life; Stu- 
dent-faculty relations, and problems 
concerning men and women on the 
campus. 

III. Speakers of National Repute 

In the months to follow, the Star 



social and religious problems. These 
men will be from the larger universi- 
ties such as Yale and Harvard and 
some will be authors and editors. 

Some of the students may question 
the value of having speakers of this 
itype address us. To these we want 
to ask just one question, "What can 
be of greater importance than the de- 
cisions we now make that will go to 
make the world a better or worse 
place in future years according as we 
now decide." And yet how many of 
our students at L. V. have done any 
sort of really serious thinking on mat- 
ters of privilege, unequal distribution 
J A vie coLLEGiicx.NK. a u nn nl»rj bf health, prevalence of poverty, ra- 



A.icesta Slichter, '30 .... Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess, '30 Clionian 

Grace Keener, '30 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . . Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 

Guy Latimer. '32 

Alumni Reporter* 
BUSINESS STAPP 

John Snyder, '19 

.Business Manager 

Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers, '30 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

ills* Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 



Book Review 



"THE WAVE" 



By Evelyn Scott 
Reviewed by E. M. H. 



31 



of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Single Copies 10 cent* 



COLLEGE TRAINING 

NOT FROM BOOKo 



cial prejudice, existence of war and 

hundreds of other questions that must 

be answered and solved by students. 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 1 f or w e are the idealists of the present 

office as second class matter under tn« I , , , , , 

act of March 3. 1879. | ! who become the makers and builders 

of the future. It has been remarked 
by those of our students who have at- 
tended meetings at other colleges that 
they are unable to talk intelligently 
or to take part in the discussions for 
the reason that these other colleges 
are putting some deep thought on 
these problems and have the leaders 
of thought in these lines help them in 
their thinking. 

Of course it is not expected nor de- 
sired that we accept all the ideas and 
statements of the men who will visit 
us. But we do hope that they will 
succeed in starting some real thit?i- 
mg on our own campus. So we con- 
gratulate the Y cabinets on their plans 
foresight and initiative, and hope that 
•all the students will realize the oppor- 
tunities offered and take full advan- 
tage of them. 



I. Expect What at College? 

College! What a world of ideas, 
hopes and aspirations that word open- 
ed to us when we were students in 
grammar and high school. It might 
be wise for all of us, and especially 
for the Freshmen who have their en- 
tire career ahead of them, to stop and 
think just why we are here, what we 
expect to get out of our college life 
while we are here and after we com- 
plete it, and what our college is really 
doing for us. Is the institution called 
"college" merely a machine instituted 
with the purpose of turning out, after 
a certain standardized process, a 
number of men and women of mono- 
tonously alike personalieies or is it 
something more? We hope that it is 
a great deal more than that. Rather 
than being another machine in a me- 
chanistic age it should be a developer 
of the liner, innermost part of the in- 
dividual — his ego, which we call per- 
sonality. In this process of develop- 
ment it should give to him a world 
outlook — the ability to look on ques 
tions as an inhabitant, not of a city, 
or state, or country, but of the world. 



-O- 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



CHANNEL VIA TUNNEL 

Again the idea of building a chan- 



nel 



under the North Sea between 
Great Britain and France is in the 
news. This idea was first mooted 
oy a French engineer over a hundred 
years ago and has "cropped up" at 
intervals ever since. Recently a com 
It is with this phase of development I mittee was appointed by the govern 
that we wish to deal. I ment to inquire into the feasibility of 

Students who have been at L. V. in building a railroad tunnel between 
former years know that we have had France and England. A favorable de 
practically nothing, of this world cision on the project indicates that 
touch." Other colleges such as Action may be taken within the 
Dickenson, Muhlenberg, Penn andh tuture 
Pitt have had at various times world The tunnel, it is said, could be con- 
known men speak to their students J structed for $150,000,000, and would 
on these matters and it was a yearly provide employment for 12,000 men 
occurrence for some of our own stu- ^ or a period of four years — a weighty 
dents to point out to us our deficiency consideration at the present stage of 
in this respect. But no organization Brit >sh industry. It would probably 
on the campus would go to the ex- divert much of the tourist traffic from 
pense .and take the responsibility of P he contine nt to England and so prove 
making that their work. - As a result I an econ °mi c asset and thus be made 



we went along thru the school year 
without the "breath of fresh air" from 
that bigger campus, the world. 
II. Campus Discussion 

Now, at last, the long desired is 
coming to pass. The Y. M. C. A. an- 1 



to pay for itself in time. It would 
also cut out one of the most unpleas- 
ant sea voyages in the world. 
NAVAL LIMITATIONS 
An outstanding event of interest to 
all the world is the meeting of Prime 
Minister MacDonald of Great Britaii 



Y W C. A. cabinets have made the with Pres. Hoover this week for the 
job their own and this year we will purpose of discussing naval limitations 
have the opportunity of hearing men 'between the U. S. and England 
who have traveled the world in study- 
ing its problems speak to us. 

The latter part of this month a con- 
f erence will be held on our campus. 
We are told by those who are making 
the arrangements that four men, who 



A-ll 

appearances seem to indicate that 
some agreement will at least be 
I reached. The St. Louis Globe-Demo- 
crat says in this respect: 

"It is reasonably assumed that Mr. 
MacDonald would not take the polit- 
are authorities on the subjects they ; ca l risk of a trip to the United States 
will present, are being secured. They to give conspicuous emphasis to the 
matters which importance of a naval understanding 
concern us ch.efly m our life here, but unless he was quite sure of the out 
to an extent in our graduate life also. (Continued on Page 4) 



Every great event in history causes 
jnore or less misconstruction. There 
is no occurrence of wide interest 
which does not find itself the victim of 
misunderstanding. Civil strife is per- 
haps the greatest of these events. Our 
own civil war is no exception. We 
northerners think we art unprejudiced. 
But are we? One need but come in 
contact with the other side to learn 
that behind our sympathy is censure. 
Anyway, in most instances, the south 
in the war is pictured as the offender. 
Now the doors have been opened. 

This new book which deals with both 
the Union and Confederacy is unique 
in its frankness. Nothing is conceal- 
ed. We are shown the war as we are 
forced to believe it really took place. 
Neither does this book treat merely 
of those in the fore. We learn the 
actual physical and mental exper- 
iences of every type of man in the 
states. "The Wave" brings to us a 
new understanding of the South — the 
South, not as a land of cruel brutality, 
of obstinacy, but a land of principle. 
Just as the North fought for a tenet, 
so the South rallied around its lead- 
ers in the fight for principle. But 
there is disillusionment for us in an- 
other way. Though as a mass, we of 
the North fought for our faith in free- 
dom, the individual soldiers are pre- 
sented to us as humans, as real sol- 
diers, fighting because they were com- 
pelled to do so by spirit or nation. 

Then as an outgrowth of the pre- 
ceding thought comes this: That the 
war was not holy. Some called it the 
modern Armageddon, some felt that 
it was the War of the Lord, but those 
in command were only frail mortals. 
Why then was the war fought? It 
was necessitated by force; we were 
driven into it by a coalition of events 
over which we had lost control. It 
was very unlike the Crusades, to 
which our enthusiasm has led us to 
compare it. War against brethren is 
very rarely accompanied by sanctity. 
So it was here. 

The life of the war on both sides is 
shown from all angles. The horror 
of death, of hunger, of desertion, of 
authority — each finds its way into the 
pages of the book. The heroism ofc 
the soldiers is somewhat shadowed by 
the desperation caused by troubles. 
Yet as Shakespeare comes from his 
pedestal in the sonnets and becomes 
human, so the men at arms are pre- 
sented to us, not as demigods, but as 
fellow mortals. f 

The heroic women of the time are 
usually given as those who follow 
as nurses. "The Wave" presents no 
nurse at all. The women are pre- 
sented at home. They are made 
herpic in sacrifice. A northern wo 
man's chief denial lay in giving hus- 
bands and sons. And this deed is ap- 
preciated. But how much more a 
southern woman sacrificed! If she 
once had wealth, it was dissolved in 
paids; if she had been poor, her pov- 
erty was decreased to starvation. 
Never before has the agony of hunger 
been painted in more vivid pictures, 
except in the "Tale of Two Cities." 
How much honor these women de- 
Serve ! 

The view of President Lincoln is 
peculiarly intimate. He is shown, 
not at affairs of state, but in his home 
during the quiet of night. Here, too, 
our set of opinions must be changed. 
We have come to think of him as the 
Saviour of our country, and so he was 
—NOT BY CHOICE, BUT Nt^ 
SITY. Nor did he have the keen love 
for the negro with which we have 
credited him. Emancipation was the 
only thing which could end the 
iffd thereby save the nation. But our 
(Continued on Page 4) 



Our Dean 




CO-EDS PROFIT BY 

CHANGE IN R UL ^ 
(Continued from Page i) v 



7:30 
in dormitories 



MME. MARY C. GREEN 

• As Mme. Green begins her tenth 
year as Dean of Women, some view 
jng her career objectively may say it 
must have been an interesting ex 
perience while others will disagree 
However, a peep into Mme. Green's 
surroundings and activities prior to 
her deanship, will make us all agree 
that hers has been a brilliantly color- 
ful life. 

For almost fifteen years Mme 
Green resided in Paris, where her 
apartment was a gathering place for 
American artists studying abroad, One 
of these artists, a young girl from 
South Dakota, painted the portrait of 
Mme. Green. This painting was ac- 
cepted for exhibition in the 
annual Spring Salon held in the 
Grand Palais on the Champs Elysees. 
Men and women, world-f|amous in 
the art of music, also made the res- 
idence of M. and Mme. Green their 
rendezvouse. Here gathered Edward 
Johnson, the great American tenor, 
and his wife, the daughter of a Portu- 
guese Count. Here also came Mme. 
Chaminade and Moskowski, the great 
composers, Gabrilovitch, the famous 
pianist, 1 and occasionally Enrico 
Caruso. Cheiro, the great palmist 
who twenty years ago was reading 
the palms of all the crowned heads 
in Europe, was likewise a close friend 
of M. and Mme. Green. 

Paris has always been the vacation 
spot for European royalty. Often 
Mme. Green states, she passed King 
Leopold, former king of Belgium, on 
Paris streets while the ruler was there 
incognito. The Kings of Spain, and 
Sweden, the king and queen of Italy 
and the Shah of Persia were frequent 
visitors in Paris while Mme. Green 
lived there. She also recalls glimpses 
of King Edward of England who dur- 
ing his short reign made many visits 
to Paris. 



Junior Privileges: 
Girls together may go down-t 
any night in the week until 7:30 p ^ n 
Dates: Any night in the week ' 
P. M. (girls may not entert^' 1 
ies during the we^u? 
Saturday night from 7:00 to i . 
P. M., Sunday night to church °° 
turning at 8:30 P. M. 

Calling hour is 3:00 P. M. f 0r § at 
urday and Sunday afternoons 

Junior may have one 1)1:30 Per 
mission a week subject to the app ro 
al of the Dean of Woman. 

Week-ends: Juniors may have f 
week-end privileges a semester pro 
viding permission is sent from hom" 
directly to the Dean of Womea. 

Two Junior couples may go to Leb 
anon. 

Sophomore Privileges: 
Girls together may be down-town 
any night in the week until 7:00 P. ^ 
Dates: Any night in the week until 
7:00 P. M. (girls may not entertain 
in the dormitories during the week) 
Saturday night from 7:00 until 10:00 
Sunday to church returning at 8:30. 

Calling hour is 3:00 P. M. for Satur- 
day and Sunday afternoons. 

Week-ends: Sophomores may have 
three week-end privileges a semester 
providing permission is sent from 
home directly to the Dean of Wo- 
men. 

Sophomores may have one 11 o'clock 
permission a week subject to the ap- 
proval of the Dean of Women. 

Sophomores may have no fifteen 
minutes after college social funtions. 
Freshmen: 

After Nov. 15. Freshmen may have 
one 11:00 o'clock permission a week 
subject to the aproval of the Dean 
of Women. 

Freshmen must be in their dorm- 
tories every night at 6:45 P. M. 

WeeK-ends: Freshmen may have 
two week-end privileges a semester 
providing permission is sent from 
home directly to the Dean of Wo- 
men. 
Miscellaneous: 

Only "the mothers and fathers of 
girls shall be taken to their rooms 
n the dormitoy. 

No upper classmen may take a 
Freshman out of the dormitory after 
:oo P. M. 



A DICTIONARY OF 
CHEMICAL EQUATIONS 



Contains 12,000 completed and bal- 
anced chemical equations, classified 
and arranged for ready reference. 



GRIMM'S 
School Supplies 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

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— Shaff eer's Lifetime Pens — 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SMASH THE NITTANY 
LIONS! PENN STATE 
VS. L. V. OCT. 5 



VOLUME V 



AiNNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1929 



NUMBER 2 



INTER-SOCIETY NITE 
ENTERTAINS FKOSH 



oENIOR CLASS SENDS 

80 P. C. TO CLASSROOMS 



FIRST COMBINED PROGRAM 
PROVES SUCCESSFUL 
EXPERIMENT 



A new custom was established on 
the campus this year when the four 
Uterary Societies effected their for 
jnal opening Friday evening in the 
Eagle Conservatory. At that time 
philos, Delphians, Kalos, and Clio 
joined in welcoming all new student 
into their midst while they gave ; 
short display of local talent. 

Rev. U. E. Apple, pastor of th< 
First Lutheran church, was the first 
entertainer of the evening and h< 
started the ball rolling with his usua 
crisp remarks. Then the programs of 
the societies started with a snappy 
send off by the president of the Philo 
kosmian Literary Society, Luther 
Rearick, who acted as master of cere 
monies during the performances of his 
fellow Philos. 

Philo in "Being Ourselves" 

The theme of the Philo program, 
"Being Ourselves," was extremely 
well emphasized and the fellows suc- 
ceeded in acting natural and putting 
the audience at ease. After the presi- 
dent's witty remarks the audience wel- 
comed the Philo entertainers who 
blended wit, song, and dramatics with 
a touch of seriousness into their fea- 
tures. The Philos closed their part of 
the performance with a skit featuring 
"Barney" and "Skee", unassisted by 
the four Marx brothers, in "The Coo- 
Coo Nuts". 



(Continued on Page 3) 
O 



Y" PLANS OCTOBER 
CONFAB FOR CAMPOS 



PROMINENT MEN WILL DIS- 
CUSS LIFE PROBLEMS 
WITH STUDENTS 

The Y's are again living up to their 

°'ty ideals and aspirations to serve 
others by planning a great fall con- 

er ence to be held on our own cam- 
Pus where nationally known speakers 
an °- Naders will address and meet 
Personally a il our students. The 
tho, ught of the conference will be 
Jfjven around "Finding One's Self", a 

1 e which was chosen after the re- 
ts of the Questionnaire conducted 

. yea r in chapel were carefully con- 
sidered. 

The leaders secured with the aid of 
Mr - Ingles, the "Y" Secretary, are 
t ^ en w ho have had experience along 

es! • with wnich tlie y are to deal 

j le Jecial 'y, and are willing to come 

fc/ 6 SnC * s ' iare their advanced ideas 

youth 6 PUrC love of aidinff bewilderc' 
"to find their right place in Life. 

he th Week ~ eml of ° ct - 25-26-27 wi 11 
bort e . 0ccasion of this wonderful op- 
je Xo u ^ 1It y for our students to share in 
(r em enences similar to those formerly 
and°t) C ^ as ^ ar * om us as Eagles Mere 
*an 1 khi11 Falls - Frida y morning 
s evice 3 of that week will be the 

(Continued on Page 4) 



This year's class of practice teach- 
ers is the largest class to have gone 
from Lebanon Valley to teach in the 
Annville High School since the sys- 
tem was inaugurated seven years ago. 
There will be sixty-three novices 
teaching during the year, which is 
over eighty per cent of the Senior 
class. 

It is the plan of the department to 
assign to the neophytes his or her 
major subject, and if that is not pos- 
sible, his or her minor subject, so thai 
the experience gained will be of true 
teaching value. Especial effort has 
been taken this year to adjust the 
practice teaching periods so that the 
collegiate programs of the student 
teachers do not conflict with their 
high school periods. 

It is interesting to note that there 
will be three times as many womet 
teaching the first semester as men, the 
count being 21 to 7. 

O 



MEN'S SENATE GOVERN 
WITH REVISED RULES 

PUBLIC MEETINGS OF BODY 
ARE PART OF CHANGES 
IN CONSTITUTION 

The new Men's Senate, formally in- 
stalled by Professor Gingrich at the 
chapel exercises last Thursday morn- 
ing, will inaugurate the newly revised 
constitution of the senate. 

Under the new methods to be used 
this year, the major offences are to be 
rigidly enforced, the senate meetings 
are to be open to the public, and all 
charges must be handed to the senate 
in writing together wdtk the name of 
the person making the charge. Trials 
will follow court procedure and the 
accused may select a defender. 

It is expected that this new sys- 
tem will do away with some of the 
pitfalls formerly experienced, and will 
■aise the standards of student govern- 
ment. Mr. Albright, the president of 
tiie senate, in a speech to the men of 
the student body after installation, 
asked the cooperation of the fellows 
n conducting a successful school year, 
and added particulars on the new sys- 
tem. 

A box has been installed in the "Y" 
room of the dormitory in which the 
cards bearing the charges can be de- 
posited. 

— O 

DR. DERICKSON IS 

TAKING YEAR'S REST 

On account of his ill health, Dr. 
Derickson, acting upon his physician's 
dvice, has decided to rest this year. 
This means, of course, that he will not 
meet any of his classes. 

At present Dr. Derickson is spend- 
ng his time at his cottage at Mt. 
Gretna. Although his health will no' 
permit him any great activity, he is 
still studying and still has the prog- 
ess of the school at heart. 

The students who knew him arc 
ery sorry that he is not back on the 
campus, but are glad that he may fee 1 
sure that his place is capably filled 
by Dr. V. Earl Light, who was for- 
merly one of his best students. 



GOEOS PHOFIT BY 
CHANGE IN RULES 

W. S. G. A. ADVANCES PRIV 
ILEGES FOR ALL CLASSES 
ON CAMPUS 



DR. SHENK ADDRESSES 

OKLAHOMA INDIANS 



A number 01 changes have been 
made in the rules and regulations 
governing the behavior of the girls in 
the dormitories. More privileges are 
being allowed, which are howevei, 
only established on a trial basis. 
The success of these changes 
lies entirely with the girls. The 
revisions were made by the board 
with the aid of the Dean of women, 
were approved by the faculity, and fin 
ally voted on by the Student Govern 
ment Association. 

Some of the revisions are as fol 
lows: 

Senior Privileges: 

Girls together may be downtown 
any night in the week until 8:00 
P. M. 

Dates: Any night in the week un- 
til 8:00 P. M. (girls may not inter- 
tain in dormitories during the week), 
Saturday nights from 7:00 to 10:00 
P. M. , Sunday nights to church, re 
turning at 8:50 P. M. Calling hour, 
is 3:00 P. M. for Saturday and Sun- 
day afternoons. 

Seniors may go out of town over 
any week-end providing they sign the 
registration siips and register with 
the Dean of Woman. 

Seniors may have one 12 o'clock 
permission and one 11:30 permission 
a week subject to the approval of the 
Dean of Woman. 

One Senior couple may go to Leb- 
anon. 

After April 1st Seniors may enter- 
tain men Wednesday and Sunday 
evenings until 10:00 P. M. 

(Continued on Page 2) 

O 

SHOOTERS ARE FITTED 

WITH NEW EQUIPMENT 



Members of the rifle club are pre- 
paring for another busy season. A 
meeting will be held in the near fu- 
ture to elect new officers and to decide 
whether or not Lebanon Valley will 
enter the intercollegiate matches. Last 
year the team made a weak showing 
in this competition but it was due part- 
ly to the fact that the members were 
not equipped with first class rifles. 
This year new Springfield 22's with 
the special micrometer sights have 
been secured from the War Depart- 
ment and with the acquisition of these 
rifles better scores should be made and 
the team meet with greater success. 

Besides shooting matches at close 
ranges of 50 and 75 feet, the club will 
take several trips to Mount Gretna 
where the regular army rifle is used 
in shooting on the National Guard 
range. 



LA VIE APOLOGIZES 

Miss Mabel Hafer and Charles 
Gelbert were not married last sum- 
mer as announced last week. They 
have, how r ever, announced their 
engagement. 



Dr. H. H. Shenk, professor ot 
history at Lebanon Valley College, 
and also State Archivist of Public 
Records at Harrisburg has just return 
ed from a motor trip to Oklahoma 
where he delivered an address and 
carried a mission to the Delaware 
Indians at the eservation in Dewey 
in the interests of his Harrisbur 
position. After a few days at this 
place, he left for the east again.fol- 
lowing a different route tjhan that 
taken going west. 

Dr. and Airs. H. H. Shenk return 
ed Sunday from their trip which took 
them through Ohio and the Midwest, 
having visited friends and relatfies 
in Kansas as well as attending to Dr. 
Shenk's business in Oklahoma. 

Dr. Shenk met his class in Ameri 
can History accosding to schedule on 
Monday. 

They were accompanied as far as 
Pittsburgh by Miss Lucille Shenk, 
'24 and Mr. Lawrence Derickson, '29, 
who are at present taking graduate 
burgh. 

O 



STAR COURSE SHOWS 
VARIETYJN FEATURES 

MUSIC AND DRAMA ARE HIGH 
LIGHTS OF COURSE 
OPENING OCT. 28 



Probably the first chapel event of 
importance in this school year will be 
the opening Star Course program to 
be held Monday evening, October 28th, 
in the Conservatory. These programs 
are sponsored by the Y. M. and Y. W. 
IC. A. as a source of entertainment for 
the student body in general. The com- 
mittee asks for the whole-hearted sup- 
port of every student. 

The entertainers for the first night 
will be the John Ross Reed Company. 
John Ross Reed who is a world fam- 
ous baritone, recording artist and an 
actor, heads the band of singers who 
will entertain us with delightful mu- 
sic. The program includes such pop- 
ular offerings as scenes from "Madame 
Butterfly," "The Pagoda of Flowers," 
(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

(CLASS OFFICERS FOR 

FIRST TERM CHOSEN 



At an important business meeting, 
Monday, Sept. 23, the Sophomore 
(class elected their officers for the first 
semester. It was a contested election 
\with the following results: Allen 
Shortledge, president; Ruth Shroyer, 
vice-president; John Morris, treasurer, 
and Robert Rawhouser, financial sec- 
retary. The officers recently elected 
promised a busy and successful term. 

The Junior class recently elected 
their officers to lead them during the 
first half of the year. The forunatr 
ones are: Alexander Grant, presi- 
dent; Margaiet Young, vice-president; 
Mary Stager, secretary; Dean Sallada 
treasurer, and Sara Ensminger finan- 
Icial secretary. 

Not to be outdone by their rival 
classes, the Juniors expect to ha 1 " - 
unusual year, both financially and 
socially. 



WILDCATS DOWN L. V. 
WITH 32-13 SCORE 

LOCAL BOYS SHOW PROMISE 
IN GRID PREMIER 
AT VILLANOVA 



Although Lebanon Valley was un- 
successful in her opening encounter 
with Villanova at Vilianova Satur- 
day, our team put up a sturdy de- 
fense. The white jerseyed represent- 
atives of L. V. made a fine showing 
against the more experienced Wild- 
cat team, comng out of the skirmish 
with a score of 13-32 Many weak- 
nesses were evident in the defense 
and the offense failed to click pro- 
perly at certain times, but such con- 
ditions are generally present in the in- 
itial encounters. Followers of the 
team feel confident the boys will be 
going in top form by the time they 
tackle F. and M. 

VETS IN GOOD FORM 

Bartlett, Lechthaler and Heller 
were the bulwark of the Lebanon 
Valley line. These three boys are 
playing their second year on the var- 
fsity and showed a world of improve- 
ment in their playing over last year. 
In the third quarter Heller jumped 
high in the air between a pass and 
raced for the first Lebanon Valley 
touchdown. A pass to Daub netted 
the extra point. 

In the fourth quarter Sweeney 
Light, who had replaced Daub, inter- 
cepted a forward pass and Taced 85 
yards for a touchdown. Through- 
out the game the brunt of the ball 
toting fell to Nye and Daub. These 
two backs played a great game and 
were responsible for the majority of 
the Lebanon Valley gains. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



-O- 



GIRLS RESUME THEII 
CAMPUS ATHLETICS 

DIRECTRESS SCHEDULES 
BOTH HOCKEY AND ARCHERY 
FOR FALL SPORTS 



In a few weeks, girls' athletics un- 
der the coaching of Miss Louise Fen- 
cil, will be formally launched. Hockey 
and archery will be first begun, with 
the possibility of some tennis. Later 
on, the ever popular sport, basket- 
ball, will be the feature of the girls' 
athletics. 

Because of the physical examina- 
tions which every Freshman girl h 
-required to take before the physical 
/education studies can be started, the 
iris get a short vacation from hock- 
ey and archery. The regulation out- 
fit of Lebanon Valley College which 
was adopted last year will be seen on 
all of the new girls, and also on the 
students of last year's Freshman 
class. 

Dr.^Polk is once more the compe- 
tent Teacher of Hygiene, which sub- 
ject has now become a required 
course in the school. She has been 
busily engaged in giving every Fresh- 
man girl a thorough examination. No 
(Continued on Page 3) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3. 1929. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



STAII 

. Editor-in-Chief 



EDITORIAL 

Esther Angstadt, '30 
Gladys Knaub, '30 

J. Calvin Keene Associate Editor 

C. Alfred Shenk Managing Editor 

KEPOBTOBIAL STATP 

Warren E. Burtner, '30 

Ruth Shroyer. '32 

Phyllis Trone. '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 

General Reporters 
Robert L. Raudabush, General Reporter 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess, '30 Clionian 

Grace Keener. '30 Delphian 

Philip Barnes. '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . . Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 

Guy Latimer, '32 .... 

Alumni Reporters 

BUSINESS ST AIT 

John Snyder, '30 

Business Manager 

Alexander Grant, '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

WiUlam J. Myers, '30 
" ....... Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 

Dr Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of tne Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
elation of the Middle Atla ntic States. 

Subscription $1-50 per year 

Single Copies lu cent» 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tn« 
act of March 3, 1879. 



COLLEGE TRAINING 

NOT FROM BOOKo 



I. Expect What at College? 

College! What a world of ideas, 
hopes and aspirations that word open 
ed to us when we were students in 
grammar and high school. It might 
be wise for all of us, and especially 
for the Freshmen who have their en 
tire career ahead of them, to stop and 
think just why we are here, what we 
expect to get out of our college life 
while we are here and after we com 
plete it, and what our college is really 
doing for us. Is the institution called 
"college" merely a machine instituted 
with the purpose of turning out, after 
a certain standardized process, 
number of men and women of mono- 
tonously alike personalieies or is 
something more? We hope that it is 
a great deal more than that. Rather 
than being another machine in a me 
chanistic age it should be a developer 
of the finer, innermost part of the in 
dividual — his ego, which we call per- 
sonality. In this process of develop 
ment it should give to him a world 
outlook — the ability to look on ques 
tions as an inhabitant, not of a city 
or state, or country, but of the world 
It is with this phase of development 
that we wish to deal. 

Students who have been at L. V. in 
former years know that we have had 
practically nothing of this world 
touch. Other colleges such as 
Dickenson, Muhlenberg, Penn and 
Pitt have had at various times world 
known men speak to their student 
on these matters and it was a yearly 
occurrence for some of our own stu 
dents to point out to us our deficiency 
in this respect. But no organization 
on the campus would go to the ex- 
pense and take the responsibility o 
making that their work. As a result 
we went along thru the school year 
without the "breath of fresh air" from 
that bigger campus, the world. 
II. Campus Discussion 

Now, at last, the long desired i 
coming to pass. The Y. M. C. A. an 
Y. W. C. A. cabinets have made the 
job their own and this year we will 
have the opportunity of hearing men 
who have traveled the world in study- 
ing its problems speak to us. 

The latter part of this month a con- 
ference will be held on our campus. 
We are told by those who are making 
the arrangements that four men, who 
are authorities on the subjects they 
will present, are being secured. They 
will discuss with us matters which 
concern us chiefly in our life here, but 
to an extent in our graduate life also. 



he questions discussed will be those 
decided upon by the students last 
spring: How to form a philosophy of 

fe; Finding one's place in life; Stu- 
dent-faculty relations, and problems 
concerning men and women on the 
campus. 

III. Speakers of National Repute 

In the months to follow, the Star 
Course committee, a branch of the Y 
cabinets, is planning to bring here 
monthly chapel speakers who will 
discuss economic, international, racial, 
;ocial and religious problems. These 
men will be from the larger universi- 
ties such as Yale and Harvard and 
some will be authors and editors. 

Some of the students may question 
he value of having speakers of this 
type address us. To these we want 
to ask just one question, "What can 
be of greater importance than the de- 
cisions we now make that will go to 
make the world a better or worse 
place in future years according as we 
now decide." And yet how many of 
our students at L. V. have done any 
sort of really serious thinking on mat- 
ters of privilege, unequal distribution 
of wealth, prevalence of poverty, ra- 
cial prejudice, existence of war and 
hundreds of other questions that must 
be answered and solved by students, 
for we are the idealists of the present 
who become the makers and builders 
f the future.* It has been remarked 
by those of our students who have at- 
ended meetings at other colleges that 
they are unable to talk intelligently 
or to take part in the discussions for 
the reason that these other colleges 
are putting some deep thought 



Book Review 



"THE WAVE" 



By Evelyn Scott 
Reviewed by E. M. H. 



31 



Every great event in history causes 
(more or less misconstruction. Then- 
is no occurrence of wide interest 
which does not find itself the victim oj 
misunderstanding. Civil strife is per- 
haps the greatest of these events. Our 
own civil war is no exception. We 
northerners think we art unprejudiced. 
•But are we? One need but come in 
contact with the other side to learn 
that behind our sympathy is censure. 
Anyway, in most instances, the south 
in the war is pictured as the offender. 
Now the doors have been opened. 

This new book which deals with both 
the Union and Confederacy is unique 
in its frankness. Nothing is conceal- 
ed. We are shown the war as we are 
forced to believe it really took place. 
Neither does this book treat merely 
of those in the fore. We learn the 
actual physical and mental exper- 
iences of every type of man in the 
states. "The Wave" brings to us a 
new understanding of the South — the 
South, not as a land of cruel brutality, 
of obstinacy, but a land of principle. 
Just as the North fought for a tenet, 
so the South rallied around its lead- 
ers in the fight for principle. But 
on I there is disillusionment for us in an 



Our Dean 



these problems and have the leaders • other way. Though as a mass, we of 
of thought in these lines help them in ! the North fought for our faith in free- 




their thinking. 

Of course it is not expected nor de- 
sired that we accept all the ideas and 
statements of the men who will visit 
us. But wc do hope that they will 
succeed in starting some real thint- 
ing on our own campus. So we con- 
gratulate the Y cabinets on their plans, 
oresight and initiative, and hope that 
all the students will realize the oppor- 
tunities offered and take full advan- 
tage of them. 



-O- 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



CHANNEL VIA TUNNEL 

Again the idea of building a chan 
nel under the North Sea between 
Great Britain and France is in the 
news. This idea was first mooted 
by a French engineer over a hundred 
years ago and has "cropped up" at 
intervals ever since. Recently a com- 
mittee was appointed by the govern- 
ment to inquire into the feasibility of 
building a railroad tunnel between 
France and England. A favorable de- 
cision on the project indicates that 
(action may be taken within the near 
(future. 

The tunnel, it is said, could be con- 
structed for $150,000,000, and would 
provide employment for 12,000 men 
for a period of four years — a weighty 
consideration at the present stage of 
British industrj r . It would probably 
divert much of the tourist traffic from 
(the continent to England and so prove 
an economic asset and thus be made 
to pay for itself in time. It would 
also cut out one of the most unpleas- 
ant sea voyages in the world. 
NAVAL LIMITATIONS 

An outstanding event of interest to 
all the world is the meeting of Prime 
Minister MacDonald of Great Britain 
with Pres. Hoover this week for the 
purpose of discussing naval limitations 
between the U. S. and England. All 
appearances seem to indicate that 
some agreement will at least be 
reached. The St. Louis Globe-Demo- 
crat says »in this respect: 

"It is reasonably assumed that Mr. 
MacDonald would not take the polit- 
ical risk of a trip to the United States 
to give conspicuous emphasis to the 
•■mportance of a naval understanding 
unless he was quite sure of the out- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



dom, the individual soldiers are pre- 
sented to us as humans, as real sol- 
diers, fighting because they were com- 
pelled to do so by spirit or nation. 

Then as an outgrowth of the pre- 
ceding thought comes this: That the 
war was not holy. Some called it the 
modern Armageddon, some felt that 
it was the War of the Lord, but those 
in command were only frail mortals. 
Why then was the war fought? It 
was necessitated by force; we were 
driven into it by a coalition of events 
over which we had lost control. It 
was very unlike the Crusades, to 
which our enthusiasm has led us to 
compare it. War against brethren is 
very rarely accompanied by sanctity. 
So it was here. 

The life of the war on both sides is 
shown from all angles. The horror 
of death, of hunger, of desertion, of 
authority — each finds its way into the 
pages of the book. The heroism of 
the soldiers is somewhat shadowed by 
the desperation caused by troubles. 
Yet as Shakespeare comes from his 
pedestal in the sonnets and becomes 
human, so the men at arms are pre- 
sented to us, not as demigf ds, but as 
fellow mortals. 

The heroic women of the time are 
usually given as those who follow 
as nurses. "The Wave" presents no 
nurse at all. The women are pre- 
sented at home. They are made 
heroic in sacrifice. A northern wo- 
man's chief denial lay in giving hus- 
bands and sons. And this deed is ap- 
preciated. But how much more a 
southern woman sacrificed! If she 
once had wealth, it was dissolved in 
raids; if she had been poor, her pov- 
erty was decreased to starvation. 
Never before has the agony of hunger 
been painted in more vivid pictures, 
except in the "Tale of Two Cities." 
How much honor these women de- 
serve! 

The view of President Lincoln is 
perculiarly intimate. He is shown, 
not at affairs of state, but in his home 
during the quiet of night. Here, too. 
our set of opinions must be changed. 
We have come to think of him as the 
Saviour .pf our country, and so he was 
—NOT BY CHOICE, BUT NF<~~~ 
SITY. Nor did he have the keen love- 
for the negro with which we have 
rredited him. Emancipation was the 
only thing which could end the 
tnd thereby save the nation. But our 
(Continued on Page 4) 



MME. MARY C. GREEN 

As Mme. Green begins her tenth 
year as Dean of Women, some view- 
ing her career objectively may say it 
must have been an interesting ex- 
perience while others will disagree. 
However, a peep into Mme. Green's 
surroundings and activities prior to 
her deanship, will make us all agree 
that hers has been a brilliantly color- 
ful life. 

For almost fifteen years Mme. 
Green resided in Paris, where her 
apartment was a gathering place for 
American artists studying abroad, One 
of these artists, a young girl from 
South Dakota, painted the portrait of 
Mme. Green. This painting was ac- 
cepted for exhibition in the 
annual Spring Salon held in the 
Grand Palais on the Champs Elysees. 
Men and women, world-famous in 
the art of music, also made the res- 
idence of M. and Mme. Green their 
rendezvouse. Here gathered Edward 
Johnson, the great American tenor, 
and his wife, the daughter of a Portu- 
guese Count. Here also came Mme. 
Chaminade and Moskowski, the great 
composers, Gabrilovitch, the famous 
pianist, j and occasionally Enrico 
Caruso. Cheiro, the great palmiist 
who twenty years ago was reading 
the palms of all the crowned heads 
in Europe, was likewise a close friend 
of M. and Mme. Green. 

Paris has always been the vacation 
spot for European royalty. Often 
Mme. Green states, she passed King 
Leopold, former king of Belgium, on 
Paris streets while the ruler was there 
incognito. The Kings of Spain, and 
Sweden, the king and queen of Italy 
and the Shah of Persia were frequent 
visitors in Paris while Mme. Green 
lived there. She also recalls glimpses 
of King Edward of England who dur- 
ing his short reign made many visits 
to Paris. 



CO-EDS PROFIT BY 

CHANGE IN RULE S 
(Continued from Page 1) 



Junior Privileges: 
Girls together may go down-to Wll 
any night in the week until 7:30 p > 

Dates: Any night in the week unt jj 
7:30 P. M. (girls may not entertain 
dormitories during the week) 
Saturday night from 7:00 to iq :0( ^ 
P. M., Sunday night to church re _ 
turning at 8:30 P. M. 

Calling hour is 3:00 P. M. for Sat- 
urday and Sunday afternoons. 

Junior may have one "ill 130 p er . 
mission a week subject to the approv- 
al of the Dean of Woman. 

Week-ends: Juniors may have fou r 
week-end privileges a semester p ro . 
viding permission is sent from home 
directly to the Dean of Womea. 

Two Junior couples may go to Leb- 
anon. 

Sophomore Privileges: 

Girls together may be down-town 
any night in the week until 7:00 P. M 

Dates: Any night in the week until 
7:00 P. M. (girls may not entertain 
in the dormitories during the week), 
Saturday night from 7:00 until 10:00, 
Sunday to church returning at 8:30. 

Calling hour is 3:00 P. M. for Satur- 
day and Sunday afternoons. 

Week-ends: Sophomores may have 
three week-end privileges a semester 
providing permission is sent from 
home directly to the Dean of Wo- 
men. 

Sophomores may have one 11 o'clock 
permission a week subject to the ap- 
proval of the Dean of Women. 

Sophomores may have no fifteen 
minutes after college social funtions. 

Freshmen: 

After Nov. 15. Freshmen may have 
one 11:00 o'clock permission a week 
subject to the aproval of the Dean 
of Women. 

Freshmen must be in their dorm- 
itories every night at 6:45 P. M. 

WeeK-ends: Freshmen may have 
two week-end privileges a semester 
providing permission is sent from 
home directly to the Dean of Wo- 
men. 

Miscellaneous: 

Only the mothers and fathers of 
girls shall be taken to their rooms 
in the dormitoy. 

No upper classmen may take a 
Freshman out of the dormitory after 
9:00 P. M. 



A DICTIONARY OF 
CHEMICAL EQUATIONS 



Contains 12,000 completed and bal- 
anced chemical equations, classified 
and arranged for ready reference. 



GRIMM'S 
School Supplies 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Stt. 



Lebanon* 



KREAMER BROS. 

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EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 

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Phone 6R3 



Annville, P5: 



—Shaffeer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

HARPEL'S 



The Gift Store of Lebanon 
757-759 Cumberland Street 



LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 



1929 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

—JONATHAN SWIF1 



Soph: 
Frosh: 



Frosh (with red hair parted in the middle) to Miss Myers in the library 
want a College Humor or— er— er— no, 1 believe it's a College Composi- 
tion book I want." 

—LVC— 

Did you hear about the Frosh in Annville High School who told Mary 
McCurdy that if an orange and lemon were to breeded the result would be 
a grapefruit. 

— LVC— 

Alcesta Slichter is anxiously awaiting her next violin lesson because Prof. 
Malsh told her he would bring along a 'beau guide.' 

— LVC — 

FROSH SCORES ONE ON SOPH 
Soph entering Freshman's room with paper under his arm. 
Frosh: Hello, what are you selling? 
Brains, man, brains! 

Weil, you're the hrst salesman I ever saw without samples. 
—LVC— 
DARK AMERICA 
Joe Ratu, discussing polygamy in Africa, stated that some chiefs mar- 
ried as many as eighty-hve women. 

Dr. Richie: 1 have married a large number of frivolous women myself. 
Laughter! 

(What will Mrs. Richie say when she finds this out.) 

— LVC— 

THE CHARITABLE BOY FRIEND 
Dusty Rhoads after return from Library: "Say, do you know that Anne 
Gordon was talking to me again?" 
Burtner: "Yeh?" 

Lusty; "And do you know that she looked at me as though she wanted 
a date tonight?" 

Burtner; "Well?" 

Dusty: "Bet she'd go out with you because she seems to like me a lot." 

— LVC— 

First Soph: Say, do you know how to have a woman WILD about you? 
Second Soph: Why, no! 

First Soph: Go out into the African Jungles. 

— LVC- 

WISECRACKS AT FRESHMAN INITIATION 

Soph; "Now I'm going to give you each a marshmallow, and I want you 
ieed it to the person opposite you in their mouth. 

Mary Rupp, at one stage of the proceedings, made a brave attempt to 
« ence the blindiolded Alma Mater singers by raising her hand. 
Sophs to Frosh: Tell us what you think of the Sophomores. 
Submissive Frosh: They're all right. 
Cochran from the sidelines: Go on, tell em the truth. 

—LVC— 

Since the joint society program last Friday night, some of the co-eds are 
wondering what the truth is about "Skee" Wise. 

— LVC— 

^ It comes to the ears of Joe Dawgone that the South Hall division of the 
eshman girls' initiation was witnessed by a considerable delegation of 
le s. (And not all of these were students.) 

— LVC— 

Scho^t tHat Beattie Knaub combination at the Millard Sunday 
^und M bCen br ° ken UP by the S raduation of half of it, a new combine, the 
Scho "1 T rt ° n ' has taken its P lace - We hear it is a long walk to the Sunday 
but there are compensations and violets made good company. 

— LVC— 

FROSH'S FIRST LETTER HOME 

Dear Pop: 
Please send me ten 

bucks right away 
Or Sophs will lug 

my "rad" away. 



SON. 



Reply — 
Dear Sir: 

Since you've no brains 

you cannot squeeze 

A cent from me 

this winter freeze. 



POP. 



|iiiitiMiHiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiitinitmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinimiiniH^ 

I Alumni Notes I 

~iliillllllllllllllllliilllli!|||||||||||t|||i||U|||||||||||l||||||||||||(n 

Mr. and Mrs. David Shroyer, both 
graduates of Lebanon Valley, who were 
married this past April are living in 
Annville, on bhendan avenue. Mr. 
Shroyer is engaged as an agent for 
the Millard Stone Company. Mrs. 
Shroyer is the former Frances Long 
of '28. 

Miss Helen Longenecker who 
graduates in '26 and who has bee:, 
teaching in the Lebanon High Schoo 
for the past several years, has ac- 
cepted a teaching position in I'leas- 
antville, N. J., this year. 

O 

INTER-SOCIETY NITE 

ENTERTAINS FROSH 
(Continued from Page 1) 



Delphian's Melting Pot 

The Delphian Literary Society 
placed "A Melting Pot" on the stage 
into which all the entertainers disap- 
peared after their fantastic amusement. 
The scene opened with representatives 
from all countries chatting gaily, but 
fwhen the notes of the Irish jig were 
heard two Irish maidens with their 
shamrock emblems in prominence 
stepped forward to delight the audi- 
ence with a tap dance. Spain and 
Italy were likewise depicted with 
dances characteristic of those coun- 
tries. A Lady of England imperson- 
ated effectively a lover of music vainly 
trying to part with intimate pal, the 
violin. 

Scotland was there in all her glory 
and two lassies clad in Scottish plaids 
tapped The Highland Fling. A dance 
given by the heralds concluded the in- 
dividual stunts. All of the countries 
appeared clad in scarlet and gold cos- 
tumes to present a final chorus effect. 
They rendered respect to the United 
States, represented by Kathryn Hag- 
ner, who as president of Delphian 
spoke words of greeting as the finale 
to their program. 

Kalos Hold Mock Meeting 

The stage then assumed the aspect 
of the meeting place of the Kalo- 
zetean Literary Society and a forma' 
(business meeting was mimicked. The 
formal air gave way to a freer feelinp 
when "Dusty" Rhoads, the president, 
stepped out of the president's chair to 
invite the audience to "look in" or 
one of Kalo's cheerful meetings. After 
words of welcome the president was 
greeted by many loyal Kalos who re- 
turned to Lebanon Valley in time to 
be with "The Old Gang" in their 
first meeting. 

A spontaneous program followed in 
which the listeners were delighted 
with various musical numbers. The 
Kalo orchestra was well received by 
the student body and called forth the 
usual round of applause while the soln 
on the musical saw was a novel 
feature. 

Clio Syncopates Wedding 

As a climax to the love songs of 
the evening, the Clionian Literary So. 
ciety colorfully dramatized "The Wed- 
ding of The Painted Dolls." Mary 
McCurdy, president of Clio girls, we 1 - 
fcomed everybody and told of the 
method of allowing all to be witness- 
es of the wedding. A gorgeous set- 
ting was provided by a bower of roses 
/under which the wedding ceremony 
(was performed. To the tune of the 
theme song the bridal procession filer) 
onto the stage while the head dolly 
sang her explanation of the show. 
The preacher with his swallow-tailed 
coat and black book caused no small 
amount of laughter when he stalke ' 
across the stage. 

Immediately following the cere- 
mony the "dollies from The Follies" 
entertained with a characteristic dolly 
dance while the mistress of the Folly 
Dollies sang "The Doll Dance." Then 
came the time for Buster Brown, The 
Tumping Jack, Mamma Doll and all 
the painted dollies to spread the news 



|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 

jXnand About the Literary Societies! 

rHiimiiiimiiiiMiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiuiiiiwiiimiM^ 



NLvV GIRLS GUESTS 

AT DELPHIAN HIKE 



instead of a regular literary pro- 
grain in their hall on Friday evening, 
the Deiphians are seeking pleasure 111 
the out-of-doors by inviting all new 
students to join their anual hike, ihey 
will leave the campus during the after- 
noon and return at night-tall, it is 
Hoped that everyone will enter the 
roving spirit and enjoy the whole- 
some companionship of this autumn 
hike. 

O 

KALO HOLDS FORMAL 

OPENING FRIDAY NITE 



Ihe Kalozetean Literary Society 
will open the new school year with 
a program of music, talks, and enter- 
tainment on Friday evening, October 
4th. 

ihe feature of the evening will be 
an address by Dr. A. S. Lehman, of 
Derry St. United Brethren Church, 
Harrisburg. Dr. Lehman is a member 
.of Kalo and is a man who has not lost 
any devotion towards his Alma Mater. 
Robert Noll, Kalo, and a Lebanon 
Valley Alumnus, will return on Friday 
to sing in rhc opening program. 

Following the literary program, 
there will be time devoted to the en- 
joyment of a smoker. Refreshments 
will be served and as is the usual cus- 
tom, the students will gather around 
for a "Session." All new students are 
very cordially invited to attend as Kalo 
wishes to make them feel at home with 
the older students. 



-O- 



CLIO OPENS YEAR 

WITH FRIDAY PROGRAM 



Clio's opening program for Fresh- 
men and all other new students will 
be held Friday evening at 8 o'clock in 
Clio Hall. Clionians are very busy 
planning a pleasing entertainment to 
present to the new girls. 



with a liberal spay of confetti, rice, 
shoes, and balloons flying everywhere. 
While the entire cast was singing 
about the wedding, the curtain was 
rung down. 

An exceptionally large number were 
on hand to witness the performances 
and with this successful start, the so- 
cieties might consider undertaking 
projects of a similar nature through- 
out the year. 



Stationery Loose Leaf Felt Goods 
Plain & Books & Pennants 
Seal Fillers Banners 

Anything made to 
order in Felt. 

GRIMM'S 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Kodaks Circulating Shaffers 
Film & Supplies Library Lifetime 
Pens & Pencils 



PHILO PLANS FOR 

OPENING MEETING 



Philo will hold its opening meeting 
tomorrow evening in Philo Hall. The 
program will be especially interest- 
ing to the new students. The com- 
mittee is working hard to 'make' the 
evening a success and according to 
all indications the program will live 
up to Philo's reputation. Eats and a 
social time will follow the rendition. 
Everybody is cordially invited. 

The officers for the ' coming- six 
weeks were installed in a special bus- 
iness meeting. Luther Reariek, the 
president, was installed by Edgar 
Hertzler. After his inaugural speech 
he installed the following: Hoy,- vice 
president; Mund, recording secretary; 
Snyder critic; Myers, corresponding 
(secretary; Wise, chairman of the exec- 
utive committee; Hertzler, chaplain; 
Lebo, pianist; and Hughes, Allen, and 
Thrush, sargeants-at-arms'. 

O— 

WILDCATS DOWN L. V. 

WITH 32-13 SCORE 
(Continued from Pago 1) 



In view of the fact that "Villanova 
has one of the strongest teams in the 
East this year local followers can 
feel well satisfied with the result of 
the game and look forward to greater 
success in the following contests. 



(Villanova 
Terry 
Dietz 

iWitkowski 
Bradley 
Kobilis 
Conti 
Kelly 



Lebanon Valley 



Cunjack 
Bartlett 
J. Wood 
Reese 
Lichthaler 
Kelly 
Heller 
Albright 
Daub 



left end 
left tackle 
left guard 
center 
right guard 
right tackle 
right end 
McLaughlin quarterback 
jNagle left halfback 

Augut right halfback Zappia (Capt.) 
Gardner fullback ' Nye 

Touchdowns: L. V. Heller/Light. Vil- 
[lanova: Terry, Milanson, Gillespie, 
Highfield 2. 

Points after touchdown: Daub, (for- 
ward pass) Gardner, High (place- 

ments .).v-,V -J , J .• .;/,--.••, ^4 

Substitutions: Armour for. Reese, 

Warner for Nye, Murphy for Kelly, 
[Stone for Bartlett, Light for Daub, 
Thrush for Murphy, Light ' for 'Nye, 
IPatrizio for Albright, "Swope for Nye. 
Morris for Lechthaler, Frey for Arm- 
our, Warner for Kelly, Stone for 
Bartlett, Thrush for Heller, Orsino 
for Thrush, Kleinfelter for Wood. 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
A Mesage of Love to the Folks 
at Home 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



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Ann villa . ... Fa. 



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OPPOSITE P. 0. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3l 1929. 



BOOK REVIEW 

(Continued from Page 2) 



love for the man is not diminished 
President Davis is not portrayed in as 
clear a manner. The only picture o 
him is as he is in jail. But frequent 
reference to him shows the esteem in 
which he was held. The fact that h 
is not shown in any action, not even 
mental, leaves the effect of his weak- 
ness. 

As proof that this "*as! no holy war 
one need only read the description o 
social life during the time. Personal 
honor, save in the discharge of m,ili 
tary duties, was non-extant. Rela- 
tions between man and man, man and 
woman, were far from clean. Such is 
thje curse of war. 

"The Wave" has a two-fold value 
The first and more evident is the his 
toric. With the war but sixty years 
away, there is still a vital spot in our 
hearts for it. The consequences 
the strife have not yet faded. With 
such an importance attached to it, it 
is most necessary that we understand 
fbe struggle. This understanding is 
brought about in "The Wave" by the 
accuracy of detail. The author con 
sidered no research too trying, no 
negress too base but to investigate 
Nor has any truth been concealed 
Even though the truth may be incon- 
venient at times, it is never suppress- 
ed. It is indeed gratifying to be able 
to read facts, unvarnished to suit pub. 
He tastes. 

The second value of this book is 
the artistic. It is of interest for the 
accuracy of detail, of structure. It if 
exceedingly difficult to present a se- 
ries of disconnected pictures and yet 
maintain unity. But the author has 
accomplished that very thing. The 
second phase of its artistic beauty lies 
in the study of human minds under 
various influences. We are brought 
to eee exactly how each type of man 
(thought. The vividness of picture 
is most often attained by this study 
of the mind 

For students of history and students 
of artistry, "The Wave" is greatly to 
be recommended, 

(Note: This book submitted for re- 
View through the courtesy of K. S. 
teoHman, Lebanon, Pa.) 

O ■ 

BEYONB THE CAMPUS 
(Continued from Page 2) 



come. If he came over here under 
sneh circumstances and for such a 
purpose, and the effort for agreement 
failed, it would be a serious blow not 
Only to him and his party but to the 
[fi^endly relations between the two 
countries." 

Wiilliam T. Tilden defeats Frank T. 
Hunter 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4, for the 
national tennis title at Forest Hills, 
New York. 



fcETO^UTIONIZlNG FOOTBALL 

Football may undergo some radicr' 
changes as regards the coaching part 
of it in another year or more. Senti- 
ment is asking that the players do 
wc^ of their own coaching and the 
coach himself less. Pres. Angell of 
Yale heads the movement. He is ad- 
vocating that, "The coach should have 
nn further contact with the men un- 
til the game is concluded." In ex- 
plaining his stand he says, "There is 
a wide and well grounded sentiment 
that the control of our games should 
be put back more fully into the hand* 
pf the players. There is no practical 
dificulty, nothing but prejudice and 
habit, to prevent a change in the es- 
tablished procedure." 

He explains his views by saying; 
that at present the coach is every- 
fhin<? in the game; the men nothing 
This state of affairs is largely due to 
wealthy alumni of colleges insisting 
that "dear old Alma Mater" turn out 
winning teams every year and pa* 
ing large sums of money to gat the 
best possible coach to do it. Under 
Pres. Angell's plan more of the re- 
sponsibility of the game and the di- 



recting of it would rest upon the play- 
ler himself and less upon the coach' 
since the coach would not be allowed 
to talk with the men at any time alter 
the game began. The captain wouiu 
be made responsible for all the direct- 
ing and for giving his men the neces- 
sary "fireworks" between halves to 
take them through the game. 

Thus far, Pres. Angeli has not re- 
ceived any startling developments or 
results to his plan but attention is be- 
ing directed towards it and many oi 
the public schools of New tfork are 
trying it this year. 

O 

POSSUM STARTS EDuCAxIUim 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 j I ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 E j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 ' I * ^ 

L V. 15 YEARS AGO 



THE Y. M. C. A. FORMS 

A SET-UP CONFERENCE 



A 'possum for an education — ana 
both parties oi the trade satisfied. Ray 
Burracker was the party of the first 
fcart; President Hoover that oi the 
second. Kay is a Virginia mouutaa 
boy who gave the president the 'pos- 
sum as a mark of hospitality. They 
had a long talk together in the course 
of which Mr. Hoover learned that the 
boy could not read nor write and 
poke the English of Queen Eliza 
beth's time. More astonishing was 
Ithe discovery that none of his friends 
or relations could tell A from Z. As 
result of the conference the Presi- 
dent had a fund started to build 
school in the mountain community 
and had the state notified to provide 
teachers for it. 

Hoover has started the movement 
to give these people at least the ele- 
ments of education. One young boy 
and his 'possum have awakened the 
fcountry to a crying need not over 100 
miles from Washington. 

Squadron leader A. H. Orlebar 
Commandant of the British Royal Air 
Force high-speed team, makes a new 
record by flying at a mean average of 
357.7 miles an hour over a three kilo- 
meter course. 

Twenty-three Protestant, Roman 
Roman Catholic and Jewish fraternal 
orders participate together in Balti- 
more's bi-centenary celebration, and 
then organize a permanent non-sec- 
tarian body, in which every fraternal 
body, except the Ku Klux Klan, is 
represented. 

O 



HISTORIANS TO OPEN 

YEAR WITH LUNCHEON 



The first meeting of the History 
Club will be held in the small dining 
hall, Wednesday evening, October 9th, 
at five o'clock. This being the first 
meeting of the year, all new students 

nterested in history are invited to be 
present. The old members would like 

hem to get acquainted with one of 
the liveliest clubs on the campus. 

The plans are for a luncheon pro- 
gram for which a good speaker will 
be engaged. All students are wel- 
come to attend. 

O 

RAIN HALTS SCRAP 



The annual class scrap between 
frosh and sophs scheduled for 
Wednesday afternoon, was called off 
on account of rain. The date for the 
postponed event has not yet been set. 



How about your Fountain Pen? 
Nothing beats the Waterman. 
A point to Fit every Hand. 
A Guarantee with every Pen. 
Buy at 

Bollmans 

Book & Stationery Store 
33 S. 8th St. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



The leaders of the Y. M. C. A. six- 
teen years ago felt the handicap of 
not having planned more definitely for 
the year's work. So in order to over- 
come that hindrance the leaders of the 
association the ensuing year had what 
was known as a Fall Set-up Confer- 
ence before the opening of school. The 
members of the cabinet and one of the 
Eagles Mere delegates came together 
on the afternoon of Sept. 3, to pray 
and plan for a program extending 
through Saturday and Sunday. Mr. 
E. H. Ehlers, the then State Secre- 
tary of the student Y. M. C. A. of 
Pennsylvania, was present on Satur- 
day. Great enthusiasm prevailed at 
every session. Each department of 
the work was discussed separately and 
the following are some of the definite 
things planned for the year. 

1. Aim to have every Christian mai 
in the Association. 

2. Secure outside speakers to pre- 
sent claims of Foreign Missions, So- 
cial Service, Life Work, etc. 

, 3. Organize Mission Study classes 
and promote the interests of the Stu- 
dent Volunteer. 

4. Contribute to home missions 
and support a native in one of our 
church fields. 

5. Aim at securing the Honor Sys- 
tem in examinations. 

From "College News." 

O 

"Y" PLANS OCTOBER 

CONFLAB FOR CAMPUS 
(Continued from Pag© 1) 

opening, according to the tentative 
/schedule. No registration fee will be 
charged students for attendance at all 
meetings on the program as well as 
for enrollment in the discussion 
groups which will be arranged that 
day and meet Friday evening. The 
will continue through Saturday, being 
interspersed with addresses of vital 
interest. Recreation will also have 
its place on the three-day schedule. 
Worship services in our own chapel 
instead of regular church services are 
also being arranged. 



COLLEGE CALENDER 

iSiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiititiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitii 

Oct. 3— Y. W.-Y. M. Hike. 
Oct. 4 — Delphian hike. 

Kalo, Philo and Clio opening 
meetings. 

Oct. 5 — Football game, L. V. C. vs. 

Penn Sate, at Penn State. 
Oct. 6 — Y. M. and Y. W. meetings. 
Oct. 6 — Reader's Club. 

Star Course Speaker in Chapel at 
9 A. M. 
Oct. 10 — Ministerium. 

O • 

GIRLS RESUME THEIR 

CAMPUS ATHLETICS 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chimming Grand- 
father Clocks 

LIGHTS JEWELRY 

STORE 

51 West Main St., 
Annville, Pa. 
Watch and Clock Repairing 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



F. W. GERBERICH'S STORE 

Fountain Service Installed 
29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 



(Continued '.> m Pago 1) 
(girl who is physically unable to take 
any sports will be required to do so. 

It will only be a short time before 
(arrows go whizzing through the air, 
endangering the lives of every passer- 
by, and the hockey pucks go skimming 
over the green. 

At any rate, these outdoor activ' 
ties are a splendid diversion from 
studying as well as a healthful anr 1 
(necessary pnrt in every girl's col)" n 
career. 

O 

STAR COURSE SHOWS 

VARIETY IN FEATURES 
(Continued from Page 1) 



"Pagliacci," and "Carmen," inter- 
spersed with ether musical features. 

On Nov. 14, Jess Pugh, an "Extra- 
ordinary Humorist," who is slated to 
be a spontaneous fun-maker, will ap- 
pear. 

The third of the series of programs 
will be a drama, "Sun Up" depicting 
Carolina mountain life and featuring 
Marie Pavey as Widow Cagle. This 
will occur Feb. 13th. 

The final program will be given by 
the Filipino Collegians. These Fili- 
pinos come from their far-away na- 
tive land to entertain us with music 
of their own country. 

On the morning of October 9th, 
Capt. T. D. Upton, who is connected 
with the Star Course, will address the 
Assembly. 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

Quality Lunch 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM A 

SPECIALTY 
7 E. MAIN St. Annville, Pa. 



HAVE YOUR CLEANING 
AND PRESSING 
DONE BY 

Sanitary Cleaning and 
Pressing Company 

LADIES' DRESSES AND 
GLOVES CLEANED 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 



PRINTING 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 

LEBANON. PENN A. 



GLEE CLUP TRYOUTS 

BEGIN WINTER WORr 

Tryouts for the Men's Glee Cl U k 
were recently held in Professor Cra^ 
ford's studio. 

Eight old men are left from l ast 
year. As a result of the tryouts, a n 
ithe positions, except first tenor, ar 
filled. Anybody who sings first teno r 
lis invited to try out. 

The glee club is one of the oldest 
institutions on the campus and should 
be appreciated by every student. ^ 
great amount of time and energy 
often unappreciated, is given by mem 
bevs and the director to uphold the 
musical traditions of the college 

_ 

READERS OPEN YEAR 



The first meeting of the Readers' 
Club for the year was held last nigh t 
at the home of Dr. Wallace. The dis- 
cussion of the evening centered about 
Bliss Carmon, the poet. 

Miss Dorothy Hyland officiated as 
president in the place of Mr. Nor- 
man Vandervvall the president, who 
has not returned this year. 



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VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
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SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

Lebanon, Fa. 



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Wn. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Houn 

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Contractors 
LumL *r and Coal 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, October 




1929 



£A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

—JON A THAN S WIF1 



|i)itiiiiiiiiNii(iiiiijtiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii im nniiiiii 

1 Alumni Notes 

fi iiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui 

Mr. and Mrs. David Shroyer, boti; 
graduates of Lebanon Valley, who were 
married this past April are livinj 
Annville, on siiendan avenue. M 
Shroyer is engaged as an agent for 
the Millard Stone Company. Mrs 
Shroyer is the former Frances Long 
of '28. 

Miss Helen Longenecker who 
graduates in '26 and who has bee; 
teaching in the Lebanon High Schoo 
for the past several years, has ac 
cepted a teaching position in Pleas- 
fintville, N. J., this year. 

O 

INTER-SOCIETY NITE 

ENTERTAINS FRGSH 
(Continued from Page 1) 



PAGE THREE 



Soph: 
Frosh: 



Frosh (with red hair parted in the middle) to Miss Myers in the library 
_«I want a College Humor or-er-er-no, 1 believe it's a College Composi- 
tion book I want." 

—LVC— 

Did you hear about the Frosh in Annville High School who told Mary 
McCurdy that if an orange and lemon were to breeded the result would be 
a grapefruit. 

—LVC— 

Alcesta SHchter is anxiously awaiting her next violin lesson because Prof 
Malsh told her he would bring along a 'beau guide.' 

—LVC— 

FROSH SCORES ONE ON SOPH 
Soph entering Freshman's room with paper under his arm. 
Frosh: Hello, what are you selling? 
Brains, man, brains! 

Well, you're the hrst salesman 1 ever saw without samples 
— LVC— 
DARK AMERICA 
Joe Ratu, discussing polygamy in Africa, stated that some chiefs mar- 
ried as many as eighty-hve women. 

Dr. Richie: 1 have married a large number of frivolous women myself. 
Laughter! 

(What will Mrs. Richie say when she finds this out.) 

— LVC— 

THE CHARITABLE BOY FRIEND 

Gord?^^ m l°^ S aftCr r6tUrn tr ° m L]brary: d ° v that Anne 

U>rdon was talking to me again?" 

Burtner; "Yeh?" 

a d^S^ d ° k "° W ** S " C ' 00ked a ' me « ** wanted 

Burtner: "Well?" 

Dusty: "Bet she'd go out with you because she seems to like me a lot' 

—LVC— 

^Shf a wh;,^ kliow how to have a ~ w ^ yo»* 

First Soph: Go out into the African Jungles. 

—LVC— 

WISECRACKS AT FRESHMAN INITIATION 

to feed h 1 m g ° ing t0 glVC y ° U each a ^rshmailow, and I want you 

eea it to the person opposite you in their mouth. 

ideS VfJ**' ° f pr0Ceedl ^ s ' a brave attempt to 

Son h , u , Alma MatCr SmgCrS b * ra,sl »S her hand. 
Sophs to Krosh: Tell us what you think of the Sophomores. 
Submissive .brosh: They're all right. 
Tehran from the sidelines: Go on, tell em the truth 

— LVC— 

Wond S erinVl!fH pr °* ram last ^nday night, some of the co-eds are 

Kiering what the truth is about "Skee" Wise. 

— LVC— 

^eshrnaT 68 ° f J ° e Daw * 01ie "»t the South Hall division of the 

toales fA?H rTTl WaS witnessed b y * cons.derable delegation of 
cs - (And not all of these were students.) 

— LVC— 

fc*l d CZ ^ ^ Beattie Knaub combination at the Millard Sunday 
M «nd-Mort . " UP by thC ^ radliatio « of ^!f of it, a ne w combine, the 

Sc hool ;but "u e " US P,aCC - Wc hear il « a long walk to the Sunday 

« there are compensations and violets made good company. 

—LVC— 

FROSH'S FIRST LETTER HOME 

Dear Pop: 
Please send me ten 

bucks right away 
Or Sophs will lug 

my "rad" away. 



SON. 



Reply — 
Dear Sir: 

Since you've no brains 

you cannot squeeze 

A cent from me 

this winter freeze. 



POP. 



Delphian's Melting Pot 

The Delphian Literary Society 
placed "A Melting Pot" on the stage 
into which all the entertainers disap 
peared after their fantastic amusement 
The scene opened with representatives 
from all countries chatting gaily, but 
(when the notes of the Irish jig were 
heard two Irish maidens with the 
shamrock emblems in prominence 
stepped forward to delight the audi 
ence with a tap dance. Spain and 
Italy were likewise depicted with 
dances characteristic of those coun- 
tries. A Lady of England imperson 
ated effectively a lover of music vainly 
trying to part with intimate pal, the 
violin. 

Scotland was there in all her glory 
and two lassies clad in Scottish plaids 
tapped The Highland Fling. A dance 
given by the heralds concluded the in 
dividual stunts. All of the countries 
appeared clad in scarlet and gold cos 
tumes to present a final chorus effect 
They rendered respect to the United 
States, represented hy Kathryn Hag 
ner, who as president of Delphian 
spoke words of greeting as the finale 
to their program. 

Kalos Hold Mock Meeting 

The stage then assumed the aspect 
pf the meeting place of the Kalo- 
zetean Literary Society and a forma 1 
(business meeting was mimicked. The 
formal air gave way to a freer feeling 
when "Dusty" Rhoads, the president 
stepped out of the president's chair to 
invite the audience to "look in" or 
one of Kalo's cheerful meetings. After 
words of welcome the president was 
greeted by many loyal Kalos who re- 
turned to Lebanon Valley in time rr 
be with "The Old Gang" in their 
first meeting. 

A spontaneous program followed in 
which the listeners were delighted 
with various musical numbers. The 
Kalo orchestra was well received by 
the student body and called forth the 
usual round of applause while the solo 
on the musical saw was a novel 
feature. 

Clio Syncopates Wedding 

As a climax to the love songs of 
the evening, the Clionian Literary So- 
ciety colorfully dramatized "The Wed- 
ding of The Painted Dolls." Mar) 
McCurdy, president of Clio girls, we 1 - 
fcomed everybody and told of the 
method of allowing all to be witness- 
es of the wedding. A gorgeous set- 
ting was provided by a bower of rose?- 
/under which the wedding ceremony 
(was performed. To the tune of the 
theme song the bridal procession filed 
onto the stage while the head dolly 
sang her explanation of the show. 
The preacher with his swallow-tailed 
coat and black book caused no small 
amount of laughter when he stalkc' 
across the stage. 

Immediately following the cere- 
mony the "dollies from The Follies" 
entertained with a characteristic dolly 
dance while the mistress of the Folly 
Dollies sang "The Doll Dance." Then 
came the time for Buster Brown, The 
Tumping Jack, Mamma Doll and all 
the painted dollies to spread the news 



!l«HH"l»Hlllllllllimi||f|||Himil^ , mi u 

[In and About the Literary Societies! 

miiiiiiitiiiiiitiiiitiillhiiiiilllHHiiifiiiiiiiiitii i iiiiiiiii::::;:iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii)iiiii 



i\KW GIRLS GUESTS 

AT DELPHIAN HIKi^ 



Instead of a regular literary pro- 
gram in tlieir hall on Friday evening, 
tne Deiphians are seeking pleasure 111 
the out-01-cioors by inviting all new 
students to join their anual hike. They 
win leave the campus during the after- 
noon and return at night-tali, it is 
noped tnat everyone will enter the 
roving spirit and enjoy the whole- 
some companionship of this autumn 
hike. 

O 

KALO HOLDS FORMAL 

OPENING FRIDAY NITE 



I he Kalozetean Literary Society 
will open the new school year with 
program ot music, talks, and enter- 
tainment on Friday evening, October 
4th. 

-the feature of the evening will be 
an address by Dr. A. S. Lehman, of 
Derry St. United Brethren Church 
Harrisburg. Dr. Lehman is a member 
.of Kalo and is a man who has no't lost 
any devotion towards his Alma Mater. 
Robert Noll, Kalo, and a Lebanon 
Valley Alumnus, will return on Friday 
to sing in the opening program. 

Following the literary program, 
there will be time devoted to the en- 
joyment of a smoker. Refreshments 
will be served and as is the usual cus- 
tom, the students will gather around 
for a "Session." All new students are 
very cordially invited to attend as Kalo 
wishes to make them feel at home with 
the older students. 

O ■ 



PHILO PLANS FOR 



OPENING MEETING 



CLIO OPENS YEAR 

WITH FRIDAY PROGRAM 



Clio's opening program for Fresh- 
men and all other new students will 
be held Friday evening at 8 o'clock in 
Clio Hall. Clionians are very busy 
planning a pleasing entertainment, to 
present to the new girls. 



with a liberal spay of confetti, rice, 
shoes, and balloons flying everywhere. 
While the entire cast was singing 
about the wedding, the curtain was 
rung down. 

An exceptionally large number were 
on hand to witness the performances 
and with this successful start, the so- 
cieties might consider undertaking 
projects of a similar nature through- 
out the year. 



— - •>-• -•.> 

Philo will hold its opening meeting' 
tomorrow evening in Philo Hall'. The 
program will be especially' interest- 
ing to the new students. The com- 
mittee is working hard to make the 
evening a success and according ■ t© < 
all indications the program will live- 
up to Philo's reputation. Eats' -and 'a 
social time will follow the rendition, - 
Everybody is cordially invited. 

The officers for the coming ' six 
weeks were installed in a special bus- 
iness meeting. Luther Rearick, „th^' 
president, was installed- by Edgar 
Hertzler. After his inaugural speech 
he installed the following: Hoy,, vipe 
president; Mund, recording secretary-; 
Snyder critic; Myers, corresponding, 
(secretary; Wise, chairman of. the exec- . 
utive committee; Hertzler, - chaplain- 
Lebo, pianist; and Hughes, Allen,, and; 
Thrush, sargeants-at-arms. • 

O 

WILDCATS DOWN L. V. '" ' 
WITH 32-13 SCORE . 
(Continued from Pag© 1) 

In view of the fact that Villanova 
has one of the strongest-. teams- in the 
East this year local followers can . 
feel well satisfied with the result of 
the game and look forward to greater , 
success in the following contests. 



Lebanon Valley 
Cunjack 
Bartlett 
J. Wood 
)Reese 
Lichthaler 1 
Kelly 
Heller \ 
Albright 
DaUb 
Zappia ' (Capt.) ' 
Nye 



Stationery Loose Leaf Felt Goods 
Plain & Books & Pennants 
Seal Fillers Banners 

Anything made to 
order in Felt. 

GRIMM'S 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Kodaks Circulating Shaffers 
Film & Supplies Library Lifetime 
Pens & Pencils 



(Villanova 

'Terry left end 

Dietz left tackle 

iWitkowski left guard 
Bradley center 
Kobilis right guard 
Conti right tackle 

jKelly right end 

McLaughlin quarterback 
JNagle left halfback 

Augut right halfback 
Gardner fullback 
Touchdowns: L. V. Heller, Light. Vil- 
(lanova: Terry, Milanson, Gillespie, 
Highfield 2. 

Points after touchdown: Daub (for- 
ward pass) Gardner, High (place- ' 
ments). 

Substitutions: Armour for Reese, 
Warner for Nye, Murphy for ' Kelly, 
[Stone for Bartlett, Light for Daub, 
Thrush for ' Murphy, Light for Nye/ '' 
IPatrizio for Albright; Swope for Nye. 
iMorris for Lechthaler, Frey'for Arm- 
our, Warner" for Kelly, Stone for ^ 
Bartlett, Thrush for Heller, Orsino 
for Thrush, Kleinfelter for Wood. 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
A Mesage of Love to the Folks 
at Home 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



1 n 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annvillo 



Pa. 



WATCH THIS SPACE FOR OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS 

THEPENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 3, 1929. 



BOOK REVIEW 

(Continued from Page 2) 



love for the man is not diminished. 
President Davis is not portrayed in as 
clear a manner. The only picture of 
him is as he is in jail. But frequent 
reference to him shows the esteem in 
which he was held. The fact that he 
is not shown in any action, not even 
mental, leaves the effect of his weak- 
ness. 

As proof that this "'*8 no holy war. 
one need only read the description of 
social life during the time. Personal 
honor, save in the discharge of mili- 
tary duties, was non-extant. Rela- 
tions between man and man, man and 
woman, were far from clean. Such is 
the curse of war. 

"The Wave" has a two-fold value 
The first and more evident is the his- 
toric. With the war but sixty years 
away, there is still a vital spot in our 
hearts for it. The consequences of 
the strife have not yet faded. With 
such an importance attached to it, it 
is most necessary that we understand 
the struggle. This understanding h- 
brought about in "The Wave" by the 
accuracy of detail. The author con 
sidered no research too trying, no 
negress too base but to investigate. 
Nor has any truth been concealed. 
Even though the truth may be incon- 
venient at times, it is never suppress- 
ed. It is indeed gratifying to be able 
to read facts, unvarnished to suit pub- 
He tastes. 

The second value of this book is 
the artistic. It is of interest for the 
accuracy of detail, of structure. It if 
exceedingly difficult to present a se- 
ries df disconnected pictures and yet 
maintain unity. But the author has 
accomplished that very thing. The 
second phase of its artistic beauty lies 
in the study of human minds under 
various influences. We are brought 
to see exactly how each type of man 
Ithoufrht. The vividness of pictur 
is most often attained by this study 
of the mind 

For students of history and students 
of artistry, "The Wave" is greatly to 
be recommended. 

(Note: This book submitted for re 
view through the courtesy of K. S. 
©oilman, Lebanon, Pa.) 

O ■ 

BEYONB THE CAMPUS 
(Continued from Page 2) 



come. If he came over here under 
such circumstances and for such a 
purpose, and the effort for agreement 
failed, it would be a serious blow not 
only to him and his party but to the 
]fr$endily relations between the two 
countries." 

Wiilliam T. Tilden defeats Frank T. 
Hunter 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4, for the 
national tennis title at Forest Hills, 
New York. 



recting of it would rest upon the play- 
ler himself and less upon the coach 
since the coach would not be auowcci 
to talk with the men at any time auu' 
the game began. The captain vvoutu 
be made responsible for all the direct- 
ing and for giving his men the neces- 
sary "fireworks" between halves to 
take them through the game. 

'lhus far, Pres. Angell has not re- 
ceived any startling developments 01 
results to ins plan but attention is be- 
ing directed towards it and many o* 
the public schools of New iork are 
trying it this year. 

O 

irOSSUIvi STARTS Ei) uCATIOin 



A 'possum for an education— anu 
both parties of the trade satisfied. Ray 
Burracker was the party of the tirst 
part; President Hoover that of the 
second. Kay is a Virginia mounia.u 
boy who gave the president the pos- 
sum as a mark of hospitality. They 
had a long talk together in the course 
of which Mr. Hoover learned that tu«. 
boy could not read nor write and 
poke the English of Queen Eliza- 
beth's time. More astonishing was 
Ithe discovery that none of his friends 
or relations could tell A from Z. As 
a result of the conference the Presi- 
dent had a fund started to build a 
school in the mountain community 
and had the state notified to provide 
teachers for it. 

Hoover has started the movement 
to give these people at least the ele- 
ments of education. One young boy 
and his 'possum have awakened the 
(country to a crying need not over 100 
miles from Washington. 

Squadron leader A. H. Orlebar, 
Commandant of the British Royal Air 
Force high-speed team, makes a new 
record by flying at a mean average of 
357.7 miles an hour over a three kilo- 
meter course. 

Twenty-three Protestant, Roman 
Roman Catholic and Jewish fraternal 
orders participate together in Balti- 
more's bi-centenary celebration, and 
tl\en organize a permanent non-sec- 
tarian body, in which every fraternal 
body, except the Ku Klux Klan, is 
represented. 

O 

HISTORIANS TO OPEN 

YEAR WITH LUNCHEON 



REVOLUTIONIZING FOOTBALL 

Football may undergo some radios' 
changes as regards the coaching part 
of it in another year or more. Senti- 
ment is asking that the players do 
mo-« of their own coaching and the 
coach himself less. Pres. Angell of 
Yale heads the movement. He is ad- 
voeating that, "The coach should have 
no further contact with the men un- 
til the game is concluded." In ex- 
plaining his stand he says, "There is 
a wide and well grounded sentimeni 
that the control of our games should 
be pat back more fully into the hand ~ 
ctf the players. There is no practical 
difficulty, nothing but prejudice and 
habit, to prevent a change in the es- 
tablished procedure." 

He explains his views by sayinp; 
that at present the coach tS every- 
r hiner in the game; the men nothing 
Thh state of affairs is largely due to 
twealthy alumni of colleges insisting 
lhat "dear old Alma Mater" turn ou' 
winning teams every year and p;>^ 
5ng large sums of money to get the 
best possible coach to do it. Under 
Pres. Angell's plan more of the re- 
sponsibility of the game and the di 



The first meeting of the History 
Club will be held in the small dining 
hall, Wednesday evening, October oth, 
at five o'clock. This being the first 
meeting of the year, all new students 
interested in history are invited to be 
present. The old members would like 
them to get acquainted with one of 
the liveliest clubs on the campus. 

The plans are for a luncheon pro- 
gram for which a good speaker will 
be engaged. All students are wel- 
come to attend. 

O- 

RAIN HALTS SCRAP 



The annual class scrap between 
frosh and sophs scheduled for 
Wednesday afternoon, was called off 
on account of rain. The date for the 
postponed event has not yet been set. 



H»< about your Fountain Pen? 
Nothing beats the Waterman. 
A point to Fit every Hand. 
A Guarantee with every Pen. 
Buy at 

Bollmans 

Book & Stationery Store 
33 S. 8th St. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



j 11111 i 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 111 1 1 1 n 1 1 n 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 n f 1 n 11 1 11 mi h 1 1 11 1 11 11 1 1 1 ' *^ 

I L V. 15 YEARS AGO 

=,1111111111111111111 iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiE 

THE Y. M. C A. FORMS 

A SET-UP CONFERENCE 



The leaders of the Y. M. C. A. six- 
teen years ago felt the handicap of 
not having planned more definitely for 
the year's work. So in order to over- 
come that hindrance the leaders of the 
association the ensuing year had what 
was known as a Fall Set-up Confer- 
ence before the opening of school. The 
members of the cabinet and one of the 
Eagles Mere delegates came together 
011 the afternoon of Sept. 3, to pray 
and plan for a program extending 
through Saturday and Sunday. Mr. 
E. H. Ehlers, the then State Secre- 
tary of the student Y. M. C. A. ol 
Pennsylvania, was present on Satur- 
day. Great enthusiasm prevailed at 
every session. Each department of 
the work was discussed separately and 
the following are some of the definite 
things, planned for the year. 

1. Aim to have every Christian ma; 
in the Association. 

2. Secure outside speakers to pre- 
sent claims of Foreign Missions, So- 
cial Service, Life Work, etc. 

3. Organize Mission Study classe? 
and promote the interests of the Stu- 
dent Volunteer. 

4. Contribute to home missions 
and support a native in one of ou; 
church fields. 

5. Aim at securing the Honor Sys- 
tem in examinations. 

From "College News." 

O 

"Y" PLANS OCTOBER 

CONFLAB FOR CAMPUS 
(Continued from Page 1) 



opening, according to the tentative 
/schedule. No registration fee will be 
charged students for attendance at all 
meetings on the program as well as 
for enrollment in the discussion 
groups which will be arranged that 
day and meet Friday evening. The 
will continue through Saturday, being 
interspersed with addresses of vital 
interest. Recreation will also have 
its place on the three-day schedule. 
Worship services in our own chape 1 
instead of regular church services are 
also being arranged. 



Fina assortment of Watches, Rings 

Chains, & etc. 
Nt-w Century Chimming Grand- 
father Clocks 

LIGHTS JEWELRY 

STORE 

51 West Main St., 
Annville, Pa. 
Watch and Clock Repairing 



For Quality 

Baked Products 



Patronize 



COLLEGE CALENDER 

illHUimillllllllUIIIIMIIIIIIHHIIH|ttUIII!UllllllinilH»lJlii~ 

Oct. 3— Y. W.-Y. M. Hike. 
Oct- 4 — Delphian hike. 

Kalo, Philo and Clio opening 
meetings. 

Oct. 5— Football game, L. V. C. vs. 

Penn Sate, at Penn State. 
Oct. 6— Y. M. and Y. W. meetings. 
Oct. 6— Reader's Club. 

Star Course Speaker in Chapel at 
9 A. M. 
Oct. 10 — Ministerium. 

O 

GIRLS RESUME THEIR 

CAMPUS ATHLETICS 



(Continued u m Pago I) 
(girl who is physically unable to take 
any sports will be required to do so. 

It will only be a short time before 
(arrows go whizzing through the air, 
endangering the lives of every passer- 
by, and the hockey pucks go skimmino- 
over the green. 

At any rate, these outdoor activ : 
\jies are a splendid diversion from 
studying as well as a healthful am' 
(necessary part in every girl's coU* 1 * 
career. 

O 

STAR COURSE SHOWS 

VARIETY IN FEATURES 
(Continued from Page 1) 



"Pagliacci," and "Carmen," inter- 
spersed with ether musical features. 

On Nov. 14, Jess Pugh, an "Extra- 
ordinary Humorist," who is slated to 
be a spontaneous fun-maker, will ap- 
pear. 

The third of the series of programs 
will be a drama, "Sun Up" depicting 
Carolina mountain life and featuring 
Marie Pavey as Widow Cagle. This 
will occur Feb. 13th. 

The final program will be given by 
the Filipino Collegians. These Fili- 
pinos come from their far-away na- 
tive land to entertain us with music 
of their own country. 

On the morning of October 9th, 
Capt. T. D. Upton, who is connected 
with the Star Course, will address the 
assembly. 



GLEE CLUP/TRYOUTS 

BEGIN WINTER WOR& 



Tryouts for the Men's Glee 
were recently held in Professor Craw- 
ford's studio. 

Eight old men are left from last 
year. As a result of the tryouts, all 
the positions, except first tenor, are 
filled. Anybody who sings first tenor 
lis invited to try out. 

The glee club is one of the oldest 
institutions on the campus and should 
be appreciated by every student, a 
great 'amount of time and energy 
often unappreciated, is given by menu 
bei-s and the director to uphold the 
musical traditions of the college. 

O— 

READERS OPEN YEAR 



The first meeting of the Readers' 
Club for the year was held last night 
at the home of Dr. Wallace. The dis- 
cussion of the evening centered about 
Bliss Carmon, the poet. 

Miss Dorothy Hyland officiated as 
president in the place of Mr. Nor- 
man Vanderwall the president, who 
has not returned this year. 



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LEBANON. PENNA. 



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PIANOS 

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PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 
VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

788 Cumberland Street 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

Lebanon, Pa. 



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a - FR TH , G'aIDMEN 
TO VICTORY 
OVER F. & M. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



STUDENTS! KNOW AND 
PATRONIZE LA VIE 
ADVERTISERS 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER I0> 1929. 



NUMBER 



PENN STATE FIGHTS 
FOR 15-0 VICTORY 

MYLINMEN ON DEFENSE HOLD 
NITTANY LIONS TO 
LOW SCORE 



Lebanon Valley's moleskin warriors 
proved their mettle when they checked 
the powerful Penn State eleven to 
15.0 score. 

Deidrich, Nittany star, ran back the 
opening kick off 65 yards. A success 
ion of Hue bucks and end runs 
netted State their first iouchdown, 
I.arisch taking it over the line. Soon 
after the second quarter started My- 
jin substituted an entire new team. 
This team surprised bolh Lebanon 
Valley and State followers by holding 
State to a single touchdown, the re 
niainder of ihe game. This touchdown 
was of a questionable nature for 
French who received a forward pass 
was knocked down three times by 
Lebanon Valley tacklers, but the ref- 
eree ruled that he had not been down. 
In the fourth period Bowman attempt- 
ed to punt but the kick was blocked. 
He recovered, however, back of the 
goal line and a safety was scored. 

Myin was more desirous of winning 
the F. & M. game than State and for 
that reason kept the first string team 
on the sidelines for three quarters of 
the game. They could have done no 
better on defense than the second men 
but probably would have shown more 
offensive strenth. Albright, Daub and 
Swope performed brilliantly in the 
backfielcl while the entire line showed 
a decided improvement since the Vil- 
lanova game. Lichthaler particularly 
showing up well. 



(Continued on Page 3) 



-O- 



"Y" ORGANIZES FOR 

OCTOBER CONFERENCE 



CHURCH LEADERS ARE 

SPEAKERS AT CHAPEL 



The East Pennsylvania Conference 
in session this week at Harrisburg has 
brought to our campus some of the 
leaders of the church. On Monday 
Morning Dr. S. S. Hough, Secretary of 
Educational Literature, was present at 
our chapel service and presented the 
two problems, "Temperance" and 
''Outlawing War" as the grave ques- 
tions of our age. 

Dr. Samuel Ziegler, Secretary of 
Foreign Missions of the U. B. Church, 
en Tuesday morning brought to the 
students a very impressive presenta- 
tion of Jesus' Philosophy of Life. He 
assured us that to become leaders we 

ust first prove to be worthy and 
willing followers. Students are glad 
to welcome speakers of this type who 
bring us in touch with the world be- 
yond the campus. 

O 



STAR COURSE SPEAKER 



PRACTICAL PHILOSOPHY IS 
INSPIRATION TO 
STUDENTS 



New strides have been made towards 
f«e Fall Y. W.-Y. M. conference dur- 

§ the past week. In order to carry 
J all plans successfully, however, 

e following committees have been 
appointed: 

executive Committee: Fred Christ- 
nian . Ruth Cooper. 

Finance Committee: J. Calvin 
Keene. 

Program Committee: Madeline 
Kif e 

p 

-ntertainrnent Committee: Edgar 
a Jf/ er ' cha, 'nnan, Mary Rank, Eliz- 
' ^ h Plook, Robert Roudabush. 

ublicity Committee: Russel Mor- 

ii' Ulair man, John Morris, Kathryn 
na S?ner. 

Sn^ Ue I ature Committee: Pauline 
Joh„ o ' cha,rr nan, Margaret Simper, 
n Snyder. 

cr n J r ! lew Committee: Grace Keen- 
^ "airman, Edgar Hertzler. 

fCauff 1Stratio1 Committee: Lester 
man . chairman, Helen Hand. 



Captain T. "Dinnie" Upton address- 
ed the chapel assembly yesterday 
morning on the subject, "The Players 
in the Shadows '. His talk, although 
only twenty minutes in duration, was 
filled with humor and good sense and 
was immensely enjoyed by all who 
were preset. 

Capt. Upton started with a bombard- 
ment of good, clean jokes that set the 
bouse in a roar of laughter. Then, 
switching into his talk proper, he com- 
pared life to a game of football. Some 
few are stars but for every outstand- 
ing man there are thousands who play 
unknown, "in the shadows". These 
compare to the guards who are rarely 
noticed by 'he crowds but who work 
on silently. However he pointed out 
that even the guards are noticed by 
some and their acts commended or 
criticized. Thus it is the bigger game 
cf life. Furthermore, he showed that 
we are guided in this bigger game by 
the example of Christ to show us how 
to play it hard, straight and clean. 

The talk was illumined throughout 
by many personal illustrations from 
the life of the speaker. Capt. Upton 
was formerly a football player and 
coach. Before the war he directed the 
1 lay ground work in Grand Rapids. 
Mich. During the war he helped to 
direct the recreational work of the 
army. At present he is National Di- 
rector of Recreation in the United 
States, having charge of playgrounds 
work, health camps, etc., throughout 
om country. He was brought to Leb- 
anon Valey by the Star Course 
Committee through the coourtesy of 
the Redpath Bureau as the first of a 
series of lecturers that this committee 
expects to bring to the campus this 
year and as a forerunner to the year- 
Iv course which will open Oct 28 in 
the Conservatory. 



DRUM CORPS SUPPORT 
L V. GRID WARRIORS 



PARADE IN^ LANCASTER WILL 
PRECEDE GAME WITH 
F. & M. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

HAS PHENOMENAL GROWTH 



With our vim and enthusiasm peak 
ed at their highest in anticipation of 
the coming game with F. and M., the 
Drum Corps has reorganized with Mr 
'Rearich as president and drum major, 
and eighteen members, most of whom 
have had previous experience in the 
work. To arouse spirit before the 
game, the co:ps will parade the streets 
of Lancaster, followed by the student 
body in their cars with noise making 
instruments of all descriptions. The 
/idea of the entire process is to pre 
pare the town for the big game. 

Musically, the Drum Corps is muc i 
Ibttter off this year, than formerly. 
Most of the buglers have had exper 
ience with hi ass instruments and con 
equently that part of the corps is 
trong. The drummers are also out 
,full force, and, with the heavy trumpet 
section, the corps should produce 
,some snappy music. Agitation is now 
afoot to secure the services of the 
Annville Band to work in conjunction 
with the corps and make the affair a 
real pep meeting. As yet, the plan is 
but tentative. 

O 



FROSH, SOPHS CHOOSE 
SAME HlTt M HIKE 

FROSH UNDISTURBED AS 
SOPHS HOLD WEINER 
FEAST 



The Sophomores gaily left for re- 
gions unknown, Wednesday evening 
about 5:30 o'clock. The weather was 
ideal, the "eats" were all there and 
the Sophs were all in good spirits. 

As it grew dark, they trudged along 
'until they came to the site of the fes- 
tivities, the beautiful woods north of 
itown. Here amid revelry, the Sopho- 
Imores held one of the most memor- 
able hikes. A goodly number turned 
but to have one good time and ac- 
cording to all reports, no one was dis- 
appointed. 

Speeches, singing, and playing were 
the attractions with the big feature 
of the evening, the "eats"— delicious 
"hot dogs," riping hot from the huge 
tire, ready to be devoured, and roasted 
marshmallows, and cocoa milk. Need- 
less to say, the eating part of the pro- 
gram was the one most enjoyed. The 
eats being ever and the program hav- 
(Continued on Page 2) 

Will! 



The Department of Business Ad- 
ministration enters on its fourth year 
with a total registration of forty-six 
students, the names of whom with 
their respective year, appears below 
The Freshman year has twenty fri 
ture business executives of this coun 
try. One out of every three men in 
the Freshman year chose the Depart- 
ment of Business Administration 
Five of the Sophomore class saw the 
error of their ways after a year here 
land changed from other courses tc 
Business Administration. 

The Department of Business Ad- 
ministration has shown the largest 
growth in the past three" years of an} 
department in the college. At its 
present rate of growth, Dr. Gossard 
the President, will not have to worr> 
about future endowments with so 
many prospective "Wanamakers" 
'Fords" and "Morgans" about him, 
These "big butter and egg men" are ; 
healthy addition to the college. Nc 
longer do men have to choose between 
preaching and teaching or pre-medi- 
cal work. A larger and larger pro 
portion are choosing business ca 
reers. 



(Continued on Page 2) 



-O- 



OR. RUTTERWICK OPENS 
HISTORY CLUB'S WORK 

"WHY STUDY HISTORY" IS 
QUESTION MEMBERS 
CONSIDER 



COLLEGE CALENDER 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiittimiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiif 

Friday, Oct. ri— Delphian Opening 
Program. 

Saturday, Oct. 12 — Football with F. & 

M. at Lancaster. 
Sunday, Oct. 13 — Y. W. C. A. and 

Y. M. C A. at 5-45- 
Tuesday, Oct. 15 — Student Prayer 

Meeting in Chapel at 6.45. 
Wednesday, Oct. 16 — Delphian hike. 



Dr. Butterwick addressed the His- 
tory Club in its first meeting in North" 
Hall Parlor on Wednesday evening. 
His subject was "Why Study His- 
tory ?" 

The doctor stated that the purpose 
of studying history was to develop, 
mind power and spirit, to enable me 
■to ht into the problems of life and 
meet them successfully. 

He stated (.hat history is the writ 
ten record of man's struggle for real- 
ization. The study of history reveai 
he cost of civilization. He believed 
that we should recall the experiences 
of the pasi. in order to guide our own 
future. 

Every student of history should be 
liberal in thoughts and ideas. Thai we 
need to be tolerant with everybody. 
Dr. Butterwick advocates. In con- 
clusion, he stated that opinions arj 
jgoing to get us out of the rut. 

As a limit to new students the pur 
pose of the club is to create a greater 
interest beyond the classroom. While 
the history cf the past is given a place 
of great importance, the history in 
the making is by no mean neglected. 

The club was organized last year 
and it has made rapid progress and is 
assuming a position of importance 
among scholastic organizations on the 
campus. 

O 

DR. WALLACE ILL 



FROSH TAKE DEFEAT 
IN SCRAP WITH SOPHS 

SOPHS VICTORIOUS ONLY 
AFTER STRENUOUS 
POLE BATTLE 



Dr. Wallace has been suffering dur- 
ing the past week from an attack of 
influenza. His condition is now, how- 
ever, improving. The student body 
are sorry to hear of Dr. Wallace's mis- 
fortune and wish him a speedy recov- 
ery. 



The annual Soph-Frosh class scrap 
was won by the Sophomores last 
Thursday, October 3, at 3:45 p. m., on 
the green behind the men's dormitory. 
The contest lasted one hour and a 
quarter and was a real scrap as both 
of the teams were of practically the 
same fighting ability. 

The contes". was of the type where 
opposing teams rush a pole, on which 
has been placed two banners. Each 
class tries to get down the other's 
colors and carry them outside a 10 
yard circle. 

The senators as usual had charge of 
the scrap but it seemed to those who 
watched that they made the rules as 
the scrap progressed. 

Although rhe scrap lasted about one 
hour and three-quarters, the actual 
fighting time was one hour and a 
quarter. Both the teams were tired 
and the first rest was called, but both 
rushed a second time with renewed 
vigor. Three Freshmen and one 
Sophomore were injured slightly and 
extra time-out was called in order that 
they might be reviewed. 

Many times both the Sophs and 
Frosh had a good start in ascending 
the pole but were discouraged by the 
tugs of their opponents, which brought 
them back to earth. 

Finally the Sophomores succeeded 
in getting "Bob" McCusker up the 
pole. He brought down the banner 
but was attacked by the Fiosh. He 
was forced 1o pass the banner to a 
classmate, Dennis, who, by concealing 
it, finally succeeded in getting it out- 
side the circle. 

The fight was a very good one. Both 
sides showed fighting spirit. 

O ■ 



EURYDICE MEMBERS ARE 

SELECTED BY DIRECTOR 



T ryouts tor membership in the 
Eurydice Choral Club were held by 
Professor Crawford/ director. The 
personnel chosen are: 

First sopranos: Leah Miller, Alcesta 
Slichter, Hester Thompson, Corrine 
Dyne, and Harriet Miller. 

Second sopranos: Margaret Young, 
Carolen Fisher, Helen Eddy, Madeline 
Fife, and Elizabeth Flook. 

First altos: Fae Bachman, Joseph- 
ine Yake, Hilda Buckley, Dorothy 
Garber, and Kathryn Lutz. 

Second altos: Hilda Hess, Dorothy 
Hafer, I re n e Peter, Dorothy Heister, 
and Alma Clark. 

The officers elected for this year by 
the club are Leah Miller, President; 
Josephine Y"ake, Vice President; Al- 
cesta Slichter, Secretary-Treasurer; 
Hilda Hess, Business Manager; and 
Hester Thompson, Assistant Business 
Manager. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER m, 1929. 



ESTA BLISHED 1935 

A. weekly publicition by the Under- 1 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL ST ATT 

Esther Angstadt, '30 .. Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub. 'id . . Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene. '30 .. Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk. '30 . Managing Editor 
BBPOBTOEIAi STAFF 

Warren E. Burtner, '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 ■ 

KM. L. Ilaudabush. ^ nersir ^ portorM 

Alcesta Slichter, 'M I .... Cons f t ^?^ 

kil^Hesf r '3 y er ' 3 °. .V.-.V.V. CHonuS 
Hilda iiess, rn»1nhia.n 

gniUp Barnes- ?8°1 V.7.7.V: ' HwSSS 
Robert R a a r whouser, '32 Philokosmian 

Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS ST ATT 

John Snyder, '30 

Business Manager 

Alexander Grant.^31 ^-v^ • itana|eeP 

Wn . U . am . J :. Mye "' Circuiation 'Manager 

"^ACX^TY^D^SpRS - 
Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace. English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso^ 
elation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



COLLEGE CHAPEL 



A NATIONAL QUESTION 



| BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

HAS PHENOMENAL GROWTH 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Subscription $1-50 per year 

Single Copies lu cent * 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under tn« 
act of March 3, 1879. 

EXIT 1 HE MOHAWKER 



The new rule in the Dining Room 
has been the subject of many conver- 
sions on the campus. It. is probably 
the most outstanding change in the 
students regime and has been subject 
to criticisms both costru~tive and de 
structive. 

What a relief to know that each per- 
son will have plenty of time to eat the 
healthy amount of food provided for 
them! Until this year we were forced 
to dash through the meal in several 
minutes and then have plenty of time 
to walk to the post office while com 
plaining about the lack of opportun 
it3 to socialize on the campus 

Many students have expressed 
hearty desires for a chance to become 
acquainted with those of the opposite 
sex. Some have suggested dancing or 
even an increase of the number of 
joint society meetings. Heretofore we 
were not allowed time to even learn to 
know folks who regularly sat at the 
same table we did. This condition 
was due to the fact that the person 
v ho took any precious minutes to so 
( ialize in the dining room was 
sorry afterwards when b.^ departed 
with an empty stomach or when he 
was dubbed a "mohawker." With the 
enforcement of the rule that we all 
remain in the dining hall twenty-five 
minutes, it is expedient that we rele 
gate the name of "mohawker" to the 
past. 

Then too we should appreciate this 
rule especially when we :tre hosts. It 
was a very cmbarrasing situation to 
have one's guests eat in the college 
dining room, since we wens certain 
oi being the last table to i'.nish, and 
thereby have the pleasure of watching 
ihe student group greedily snatch their 
meal and abruptly leave. 

Tn the beginning of school the fel- 
lows threatened to give the head wait- 
er trouble with discipline, but now 
that they too have come to realize 
the benefits of the new rule, we are 
all grateful to those who shared in the 
mrking of it. 

However, as pessimism always 
joins hands with optimism, we find 
some who knock beside the boosters 
ef the new custom on the campus. 
Might it not be a good plan for those 
who see no good points in the new 
plan to call the roll of the faults in 
the old one and then compare. Until 
we find a beiter rule — which is doubt- 
ful — let us join in making this ncv 
one a workable success! 



The institution of chapel in the col- 
leges and universities of our country 
has been severaly criticized and ex- 
perimented with in the last score of 
lyears. Its value in the college curri- 
Iculum has been questioned and many 
different plans for making it of great- 
er value to the students have been and 
are being tried. 

Probably most colleges have the 
faculty directed and planned service, 
|n which a faculty member does all 
(the conducting. A radical change from 
Ithis plan is now seen in some col- 
leges where students assist in plan- 
ning and leading the meeting, or to 
vary the procedure, the students have 
one or two services per week pnd the 
tfaculty the rest. Many have com- 
pulsory attendance, some none-com- 
ipulsory. At most no notices or an- 
nouncements are made from the plat- 
iform because it detracts from the 
spirit of the service. 

Probably the best way to look at 
the chapel problem is to first consider 
its primal purpose and then to learn 
if it is meeting that purpose. Chapel 
(was originally intended to open the 
students' day by a period of quiet 
worship and meditation. Does it do 
this? The sshools which advocate 
non-compulsory attendance stress the 
idea that if the students are forced to 
attend they cannot possibly be in the 
■right frame of mind for worship. We 
ear that one of our eastern colleges 
has discovered a unique method of 
solving this question. Their chapel is 
not compulsory; the students have 
.their choice oi going to chapel or go- 
ing home. However non-compulsory 
chapel has not met with any great 
success. As a rule the services are 
very slimly attended, much as they 
were at Lebanon Valley when they 
rere held ; n the basement of the U. 
R. Church during repairs to the Con- 
servatory a couple years ago. 

At the Eagles Mere "Y" Conference 
last spring, Rev. Paul Jones, formerly 
a bishop in the Episcopal church, led 
the morning worship services. Altho 
they were held in a plain, roughly 
built auditorium those who attended 
felt that they really were coming in 
touch with the Divine, which is wor- 
h ; p. Tb^re was no noise or disturb- 
nce. The leader spoke briefly, led in 
)rayer, the students sang and all left 
hmid a reverent hush. Tt was hard 
to define but each felt that there was 
something or some spirit there that 
prepared him for the day's work. 

Something of the same type was at- 
tempted on our own campus by the 
"Y" cabinets on the Thursday and 
Fr'day mornings before school open- 
ed this term. The doors were closed 
and all was quiet. The leader read 
several verges of scripture another 
person spoke quietly, a hidden choir 
sang an atnhcm. As the service ended 
and the new students, along with the 
old ones who had already returned 
filed out, we again felt that same rev- 
erent hush over all and that same feei- 
ng among the students that they had 
been very near to God and that 
hrough this contact they were better 
able to meet the various tasks that 
would demand their attention. 

Chapel-compulsory or non-com 
oulsory? Student or faculty directed? 
It matters no*, so long as it meets that 
purpose for which it was created and 
hat purpose was and still is — worship. 

O ■ 



SOPHS, FROSH CHOOSE 

SAME NITE FOR HIKE 
(Continued from Page 1) 



Naturally the upper years are smal- 
ler than the lower years due to the 
iiact that they entered the Department 
when it was first started and to the 
fact that a number have fallen by tht 
wayside. The present Senior class in 
Business Administration is all that is 
left of a class of fourteen four years 
i ago. Truly "the way of the trans- 
'■ gressor is hard." 

i Four years ago there were four 
j students in Rusiness Administration 
; outside the Freshman class. In some 
'•classes there were two students. To- 
: day there is no class with less thai 
: twelve, while some for example, the 
'class in Public Finance, have twenty- 
two. 

To date there have been four who 
j have graduated with the Degree of 
i Bachelor of Science in Economics 
j These men were placed as soon as 
! graduated. This year a number of 
: other Departments were placed by the 
i Department of Business Administra- 
tion with business firms. One mem- 
i jber of the present Senior Class ha? 
j been placed with the American Tele 
phone and Telegraph Company of 
New York State and will go with them 
as soon as he is graduated. 

The course has been revised slight- 
ly each year with the requirements 
more exacting. This year the Fresh 
man class is required to take a year 
of Mathematics. The intention is to 
give the student a thorough ground- 
ing in essentials before the advanced 
work in Finance and Statistics is at- 
tempted. The course as a whole at- 
tempts to maintain a balance between 
the cultural and the more practice 
subjects. 

Tt may be of interest to know thai 
this year there is not a single co-ec' 
registered in Business Administrator 
nor in a single course given by the 
Department. Last year a co-ed 
minoring in Business Administration 
received a scholarship from New 
York University School of Retailing 
The opportunities in Business fo" 
women are increasing and in the nea^ 
future it is anticipated that women wil ! 
'begin registering in the Department. 
At present it is evident that the ma'e 
student at L, V. C. has found a safe 
sanctuary from the co-ed. 

The department announces their 
registration for this year as follows: 

SENIORS— Homer Allwein, Al- 
fred Barnhart, Luther Rearick. 

JUNIORS — Henry Berkov, Ear' 
Frey, Alexander Grant, George Pa- 
trizio, Robert Schaak Vinton Shan- 
'bacher, Charles Snavely, H'.rold Wat- 
William Lehman. 



'31 QUITTY STAFF 

READY FOR BIG JOB 



ing been finished, everyone retraced 
their steps and the homeward march 
was begun. 

Prof, hields and Miss Fend! were 
.deal chaperons of the students and 
icvery member of the Sophomore class 
was delighted to have them with the 
crowd. 

With this hike over, the Sophomore 
Jass can feel very elated that one 
more affair l as taken place without 
j'liy opposition from their close friend, 
the Freshman delegation. 

FROSH HIKE 
Not to be outdone by her Soph 
rival, the Freshman class held its hike, 
Wednesday, Oct. 9. Having been dis- 
appointed several evenings on account 
of the rain, the Freshman class was 
forced to hold its hike the same night 
as that of the Sophs. 

With their brown stockings on, and 
tho ; t- green hair ribbons flying, the 
girls of the Freshman class left early 
in the aftenoon to avoid all conflicts 
with any Sophomores. The boys, also 
eager for the night's fun, assembled 
early in order that they might start 
before any of the second year class 
might overiake them. 

They hiked for what seemed to be 
many miles until they arrived at the 
location decided for the evening's en 
tertainment. As the first-year stu 
dents are not permitted to speak to 
their class-mates, this was an ideal 
time and place and they took advan 
tage of it. 

From reports, the Freshmen are to 
be congratulated on the food which 
they served, and especially on the 
quantity. Prof, and Mrs. Bender, and 
two Senior girls were the chaperons 
for the affair. 



As the 1931 Quittic staff takes off 
its coat and tightens its belt to begin 
the gigantic task of producing this 
year's annual, it finds many new and 
perplexing problems to solve. . ] 

Only one contract, the printing, re- 
mains to be awarded. When it j s 
given out, the staff will have a fair 
/start to what is expected will be an 
excellent finish. The artists are al- 
ready sketching, the literary editors 
are planning, and the business man- 
iger is shaping the finances. 

The theme of the book will l )e a 
familiar one. It is hoped that the io^ 
Quittic will measure up to the expec- 
tations of the staff, and fulfill those 
of the students. 



RIFLE CLUB ELECTS 



The Rifle Club was organized for 
this year on Tuesday and officers were 
elected. Francis Barr heads the clul 
ajs president, while Oscar Stambaugl 
is Secretry-Treasurer. John Morri 
was elccled Executive Officer, but 
will not serw; until the spring as thi 
is a two year term office. 

Quite a few new members were 
present and it is hoped that this year 
will be most profitable. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

OUR AGENTS AT 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



kins, 

SOPHOMORES — Philip Barnes 
Paul Bowman, Forrest Clarke, Russel 
Dennis, Calvin Heller, Paul Kleinfel- 
ter, Roy Lechthaler, Giles Light 
Warren Light, Lester Miller, George 
Nye, Olianus Orsino, Warren Rugh. 
Robert Stewart, Bernard Thrush! 

FRESHMEN— Leslie Armour, Wil 
liam Barnes, Edgar Brinzer, Bucher, 
Claude Donmoyer, Frank Fernsler 
Gerald Heilman, Charles Kraybill, 
Will iam Krumbiegel, Lee Krumbinc, 
Fred Morrison, William Reese, Luther 
Saylor. William Sipe, William Swope, 
Lee Stone, Roscoe Warner, George 
Wood, John Zerby 



PRINTING 




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Quality Lunch 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
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BROADWAY PRODUCTION 

SEEN BY PHILO MEN 



Prof. Stevenson, with a party of four 
Philo members, visited New York 
Saturday night to see the new war 
play, "Journey's End." Those mak- 
ing up the party in addition to the pro- 
fessor were Earl Wolf, Alex Meyers, 
Paul Keene, and Kermit Taylor. 

Philo is considering this play for its 
Anniversary to be held the early part 
of May. It is considered by critics to 
be without question the greatest play 
written about the last war. This is 
the eighth month it has been in New 
York since its opening early last 
spring. 




40 N. 8th St., Lebanon 



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29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 



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KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

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YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
A Mesage of Love to the Folks 
at Home 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



A DICTIONARY OF 
CHEMICAL EQUATIONS 



Contains 12,000 completed and l> a '' 
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LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER to, 1929, 



PAGE THREE 




iA COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

—JONATHAN SWIF1 



One of the biggest laughs during the Class Scrap came when Dotty Haf- 
er while witnessing Bob McCusker's misfortune, exclaimed: "behold! the 
downfall of Rome!" 

— LVC- 

Prof. Stokes during a lecture in the Economics class: "You know, boys, 
kissing is an investment. You hope for a return.'' 
He ought to know: he plays the market. 

—LVC— 

When one of the greenest of the green was sent over to West Hall with 
a note for "Charlie" .Mommert he wanted to know why a man was liv- 
ing over there. 

—LVC— ' 

It has been rumored that there is a "sweet young thing" in South Hall 
who has never been on a date. All right, fellers, don't crowd. Line forms 
to the right. 

— LVC— 

Did you see the sun-lain. ed bn ba from South Hall? Joe Dawg-Gawn 
says he'd like to see her back again. 

— LVC— 

One of the ornithologists states 'that he has untwined something out of 
the ordinary on L. V. C.'s campus. After the Class Scrap, a "Baltimore Ori- 
ole" flew to a shrinking "Violet", and '•dined on ambrosia and nectar." 

— LVC— 

Lee: ''You know, every time 1 kiss you 1 seem nearer Heaven." 
Charley: "Well you don't have to go to Heaven tonight!" 

—LVC— 

FROSH REVISE BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE 

Freshman intelligence tests have brought numerous unknown facts to 
light. Disagreeing with Webster they maintain that 
Chicanery is an incubator. 
Orgy is instrumental music. 
Polemic is an inhabitant of Poland. 
One Frosh thinks "The proper study of mankind is" woman. 
Other disco\eries of hrosh knowledge are that 
Andrea del Sarto was a bullfighter. 
"Four Million" is based on High Finance. 
"Daddy Long Legs" was a friendly ostrich or an aged 
centipede. 

"Paradise Lost" is the story of disillusioned love. 
Nun's Priest's tale is a Bible story. 
— LVC— 

Mildred Saylor (as Clionians discuss anniversary): Can't we get our in- 
vitations earlier this year— 1 must send mine out of town this time. 

— LVC— 

STOP, LOOK, BUT DON'T LISTEN 

We have on our campus a Romeo and Juliet who enact before each meal 
^ famous balcony scene. Don't rush for front seats-it's only Fred on 
North Hall porch whispering ? ? ? to Little Spring Flower curled up on the 
bench in the Y. W. dining-room. 

— LVC- 
HELP! MURDER! 

Forty-three nervous wrecks among Frosh as a result of last night's mm 
der. 

Joe Dawgonc reports that even his telescope cannot locate the victim 
Dr ag the Quittie, Frosh. 

—LVC— 

Scene in West Hall Parlor 

Time n:.?o P. M. 
Dramatis Fcrsc.ir — 1 ' r ? 

"Don't! ^op! 

Don't! Stop' 

Don't! Stop! 

Don't! — Stop!" 
Ah! 



|iiiiiinimiiiiirmtiiniiiii!iiiiiiiiiniiniimiiiiiiiiiiiiii(iii^ 

I Alumni Notes I 

riiHii!iniiiiiMiiiiiii|iiiiiHiiiiiiiniitiiiiiiiiuiiiii|iiiiiiiuiiiii 

W. F. Wenner, of the class of '23, 
has recently accepted a position as 
director of research m physiology in 
the Johnson Research Institute of 
Washington University Medical 
School. FIc has also the privilege of 
completing his medical work or train- 
ing. 



cla 
ret 
uat 
cl 
|C 
for 



A 



nother one of our Alumni who 
-•re . recently married is Henry 11. 
hell- of Mt. Aetna, to-Miss Bertha E. 
ouch, of Lebanon. Mrs. Schell is 
rrraduatc of Lebanon High School, 
Us of '25, and attended Bauer's Sec- 
tarial School. Mr. Schell was grad- 
ed from Myerstown High School, 
ss of '.'o. and from Lebanon Valley 
ollege in '26. He is now a plumber 
J. H. Schell, of Myerstown. 



Another recent Alumni marriage 
marriage was that of Miss Mary De- 
ney, of Reynoldsville, Pa., and Pro- 
fessor Porte A. Wolfe, of Lebanon. 
Jr. Wolf is a graduate of the Lebanon 
High School and of Lebanon Valley 
"ollege in the class of '24. For some 
ime he was ? teacher in the Lebanon 
r. High Schools. 

Miss Esther Walmer, '27, has ac- 
cpted a position to teach in the New 
'ort High School, New Port, Pa. This 
past year she was teaching in the 
Annville High School and the pre- 
vious year w«is secretary to the Reg- 
strar, Prof. Grimm. 

O— 

PENN STATE FIGHTS 

FOR 15-0 VICTORY 
(Continued from Page 1) 



Morris anc 1 Kleinfelter, both guards, 
received injuries and had to be taken 
from the game. Morris will he opt the 
remainder' of the season with a torn 
igament in his . knee while Kleinfel- 
ter will be out for about a week with 
a fractured rib.' ' 

If the team c6ntinues its present 
progress and improvement, a decisive 
victory can be expected over F. & M. 
next Saturday. 

PENN STATE 



K 2 plan 

Shawley 

Zorella 

Eschnach 

Panaccean 

Ricker 

Fdwater 



L. V. C. 
Cunjack 
Bartolet 
Wood 
Armour 
Lichthaler 
Kelly 
Heller 
Albright 
Daub 



left end 
left tackle 
left guard 

center 
right guard 
right tackle 
right end 
Martin, capt. quarterback 
Diedrich left halfback 
Livezey right halfback Zappia, capt. 
Lasisch fullback Nye 

Touchdowns — Lasisch, French 
Point after touchdown — Diedrich 
('placement). Safety — Bowman. Sub 
stitutions — Lebanon Valley: Thrush 
for Cunjack, Morris, for Wood, Reese 
for Armour, Light for Nye. Stewart 
ft r Zappia. Kleinfelter for Lichthaler. 
Warner for Kelly, Patrizio for Al- 
bright, Orsino for Heller, Stone for 
Bartolet, Swcpe for Daub, Kazlusky 
for Thrush, Bowman for Stewart, 
Kelly for Warner, Thrush for.. Kaz- 
lusky. 

O <- 

ENGLE HALL ARTISTS 

ATTEND CONFERENCE 



Eiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimm 

llnand About the Literary Societies! 

mniiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiii LiifiuiiitJiMiiJitituiuiHiiiiiiiiiiiii:::;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiii = 



KALO PRESENTS VARIED 

PROGRAM FOR NEW MEN 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
held its first formal meeting for the 
Lenefit of the new students in Kalo 
Hall, Friday evening, October 4, at 
seven o'clock. The evening was spent 
in listening to a delightful program, 
■including addresses by Dr. Lehman 
and Dr. Gibble. Following this, re- 
freshments and a smoker were enjoy- 
ed by all. 

The meeting opened with devotions 
conducted by Kauffman. Going from 
one extreme to another, Kalo was then 
entertained by the famous trio 
Shroyer, Becker and Russel in a few 
peppy numbers. Following this, 
President Rhoads gave an address of 
yvelcome. An olive wood gavel was pre- 
sented to the Society. This gavel wa; 
'given to Kalo by James C. Hazelton, 
who had obtained it while in the Holy 
Land. A former Kalo man, Robert 
Knoll, next favored the society with a 
vocal solo. "Tips from a Senator" by 
Homer Alwein, was the next number 
on the program. A piano solo by 
Clarence Knoll followed. 

Dr. A. S. Lehman then addressed the 
society, giving it an idea of what Kalo 
meant to him and what it should mean 
to present members. Dr. Gibble also 
expressed his thoughts of what Kalo 
did for him. The closing number on 
the program was the singing of the 
Alma Mater by the society. 

Following the program refreshments 
and smokes entered in to make the 
fellowship more inviting for the new 
students. 

O 

SEPTEMBER ARRIVALS 

ARE GUESTS OF PHILO 



Philokosmian Literary Society pre 
rented an inviting program last Fri 
day night in its opening meeting. The 
program was varied and interesting 
throughout. 

The meeting was opened with de 
Votions led by the Chaplain, Edgar 
'Hertzler. The address of welcome 
was given by Luther Rearick. 

Messrs. Lebo and Jacks opened the 
entertainment with a novelty number. 
In the first part of this number, Lebo 
played a cornet with his right hand 
accompanying himself by playing the 
piano with his left hand. He then 
played a cornet solo, accompanied by 
Jacks. As a final number they pre- 
sented a pia.10 duet. 

The serious part of the program was 
a speech entitled "Friendship" by 
iPaul Evancoe. He recounted some in- 
stances of friendship that he had met 
in his extensive travels. 



CLIO TAKES GUESTS 

ON TOUR TO JAPAN 



Clio's fifty-ninth opening program 
was held in CHo hall, Friday evening, 
Oct. 4, at 8 o'clock. Mary McCurdy, 
president of Clio, conducted the for- 
mal opening. 

A play entitled "Japan via Clio" was 
presented by Clio girls. The opening 
scene was a college girl's room. Here 
ongs were sung, and many jokes ex- 
changed. The college girls were 
Liizabeth Flook, Mary Showers, Ann 
Kiehl, Dorothy Garber, Gladys Knaub, 
Madeline Rife, and Olive Morrow. 

For the entertainment of the Japan- 
ese girl, (Josephine Yake), who was 
attending college at that time, a fash- 
ion show wa^ given. The models for 
the show were Mary McCurdy, Betty 
Filack, Rose Bollman, Mary Ann 
kupp, Mary Stager, with Esther Ang- 
btadt as the modeste. 

They next attended a musical at 
which Leah Iviiller and Mildred Myers 
were the emertainers. 

As no college career is complete 
without football games, the Japanese 
girl was seen attending a game. The 
line-up for the two teams was Greg- 
ory, Hackman, Erghot, Esbenshade, 
Gich, Greiner, Binner, Light, Snyder, 
Referee, Rice. The cheer leaders were 
"Charlie"' Mommert, Eulalie Morton, 
and Helen Copenhaver. 

The scene changed to Japan at the 
home of the Japanese girl, and her 
lover, played by Alcesta Slichter. They 
composed an invitation to their Amer- 
ican friends to a tea in Japan. The 
finale is the acceptance of the iui 
lion by the college girls, and everyone 
present. The tea party was held in 
North Hall parlor where delicious re- 
freshments were served by Japanese 
girls. A delightful social hour fol- 
lowed. 

"The Old Crystal Set" was the title 
of the principal number. "Red" Barr 
at the dials tuned in on such noted 
performers as Paul Keene on his 
: kazoo; Wolf, the noted tenor; Calvin 
Keene telling a bedtime story; and 
Hughes and Mund leading an old- 
fashioned barn dance. A bass solo, 
"Mother Machree," was then sung by 
Kermit Taylor. 

The program was concluded with 
"Living Thoughts" by the editor, 
Stambaugh, assisted by Rawhouser. 

John Snyder presented the critic's 
report. Following this John Beattie 
and Joe Renew gave a few encourag- 
ing remarks for Philo. 

Immediately after the meeting ad- 
journed, a social period followed. Re- 
freshments were served and corn cob 
pipes were distributed. 



Misses Olive Wcigel and Leah Mil- 
ler and Professor Crawford attended 
the East Pennsylvania Conference in 
Flarrisburg, October 3- They were 
guests at a conference luncheon at 
ivvhich Miss Miller and Professor 
Crawford sang several songs, accom- 
panied by Miss Weigel. 



PATRONIZE 
LA VIE'S 
ADVERTISERS 



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AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

TTAT*T>T?T>C Tlie Gift St0re ° f Lebanon 

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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1929. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Directress of 
Conservatory 




Ruth Engle Bender 



WETS VS. DRYS 

Senator Howell of Nebraska, start- 
ed something when he declared (hat 

Prohibition in Washington could be 

enforced if Hoover wanted to enforce 

it. As a lesult Hoover has an 

nounced that he will do all within 

his power :o enforce it within the 

Capitol city. This statement ha^ 

proven interesting' to both tin 

drys and the wets. If he is success 

ful and makes the city as dry as the 

proverbial bone, then the drys will 

claim that Prohibition as it now 

stands is enforceable if given proper 

legislation. On the other hand if sh 

city remains wet in spite of Hoover's 

best efforts, the wets will claim that 

they were right and revision of th 

laws as they now stand is imperative. 
A GEARLESS AUTO 
And now appears the gearless car! 
Col. H. P. Green of South Dartmouth, 

Mass., had one built especially for 
himself by the General Electric engi- 
neers. In looks it is externally like 
the ordinary gas driven car except that 
there are but two foot pedals — the 
brake and gas. The clutch and gear 
shift rod have disappeared. It is a 
combination gas and electric. It is said 
to be impossible to stall and when 
starting it never jerks, but pulls out 
smoothly regardless of how much gas 
is fed to it. In speed it compares fav- 
orably with the ordinary car now upon 
the market. 

BETTER PROFS 

Better, not more, professors are 
needed in oui universities. So says 
Prof. Yandel Henderson of Yale. He 
advises the colleges to use their money 
for higher salaries and not for en- 
largements ia the faculty. His con- 
tention is that the best ability and gen- 
ius of the nation is not put into the 
colleges for the reason that the indus- 
trial world offers larger monetary re- 
turns. As money still talks, his advice 
is larger salaries to smaller faculties 

DEFEATING FOG 

Fog will no longer prove a draw- 
jack to aviation. Lieut. James H. 

Doolittle at MJitchell Field flew fif- 1 SHOE REPAIRING 

teen miles and then landed only a few! Men — Soles ...... $1.00 

feet from the place he started out un- I Heels . . .50 

der conditions similar to the heaviest I Ladies — Soles •• .90 

kind of fog. He had a specially con- J Rubber Heels • • .40 

structed plane that was light proof so I Leather Heels , . .25 

that he had to fly entirely by instru- | ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR, 



Mrs. Bender occupies a very prom- 
inent place on the campus as director 
ot the Engie Conservatory of Music, 
in addition to being a capable execu- 
tive, she is a very sympathetic teach- 
er, and an artistic performer, the piano 
being her major instrument. She pos- 
sesses a remarkable clarity of tech- 
nic, breadth of interpretation, and 
a fine quality of musicianship. 

Mrs. Bender has had wide experi- 
ence along musical lines, having stud- 
ied under such famous men as Ernest 
Hucheson, Francis Moore, Frank La 
Forge, and Lee Pattison. She has a 
Bachelor of Arts degree from Lebanon 
Valley College, attended the Oberlin 
Conservatory of Music, and was grad- 
uated from the New England Conserv- 
tory. She has done extensive concert 
work, having appeared on the same 
program with the noted pianist and 
conductor, Ethel Leginska, and had 
the distinction of being the accom- 
panist of Edmund Burke, Basso of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company, on con- 
cert tour. She has also traveled ex 
tensively abroad. 



ment. He was guided to the field by 
a beacon which caused vibrations in 
one of his indicators and by means of 
ether instruments he could tell within 
a few feet how far above the ground 
his plane was. This feat removes one 
of the biggest drawbacks to commer 
cial aviation by destroying the fear of 
fog. 

Tt was a big moment to a waiting 
world when Pres. Hoover was abl 
tj announce that an agreement ha 
been reached or almost reached, by 
which the navies of both England and 
America would be reduced in size. Fi 
hal action has not been taken by the 
countries but indications show that 
some real steps are being taken to 
give us world peace. 



O 



207 W. Main St. 



Have Your Cleaning and 

Pressing Done by 
SANITARY CLEANING AND 
PRESSING COMPANY 

Ladies' Dresses and Gloves Cleaned 
At: Reasonable Prices 



PRINTING 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER-The Printer 



A Y. W. musicale was held in the 
chapel Sunday evening at 5:45 o'clock. 
For a prelude Mildred Myers played 
very softly "Abide With Me." The 
g.'rls sang devotional songs. A scrip- 
ture pertaining to music was read, 
followed by a prayer. 

Alcesta Slichter added to the beauty 
of the program byp laying a violin 
solo, after which Mildred Myers gave 
a piano solo. Poetry on the subject 
of music was read by Corinne Dynne. 
The vesper service of music was 
c'osed by a prayer and an organ post- 
lude by Mildred Myers. 



Special Sole of $1.00 to $1.50 

WRITING PAPERS 
All High Grade — Many lined 
Envelopes 
LATEST STYLES 
ONLY 59 CENTS 
— For one week only — 
Oct. 14th to Oct. 21st 

Buy at 

Bollmans 

Book & Stationery Store 

South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



L. V. TEN YEARS AGO 



^ROF. CAMPBELL WRITES 

FROM FRENCH' HOSPITAL 



the following is a letter receiveu 
oy the editor ot the college paper 01 
ten years ago from an aiumnus who 
is now one of our active Professors. 
/\t the tune when the letter was writ- 
ten he was a patient in a French Hos- 
pital, Victim No. 14. 
"Victim No. 14 in a French Hospital 
September 22, 1918. 

" i he above headline may look some- 
what startling, but the case is not as 
bad as it might be — just bad enough 
1 his is what happened: — While out 
on the road I got too close to a cais- 
son wheel while walking up a hill to 
relieve our horses, caught my foot in 
it, fortunately was not run over and 
escaped with a sprained instep and 
contusion of the left foot in general. 

"We have been at the front five 
weeks, parts of the division consider- 
ably longer, as newspaper accounts 
would tell you, then we were relieved 
land the entire division moved back 
for a rest, and then on to a new sec- 
tor. It was while moving that my ac- 
cident happened. I enjoyed my part 
of the trip a whole lot because we 
went through some of France's pret- 
tiest country. But I don't like it here 
among all these Frenchies. First of 
all I can't understand much of what 
they say although a month, I think, 
would make at least half a Frenchman 



Stationery Loose Leaf Fejt Goods 
Plain & Books & Pennants 
Seal Fillers Banners 

Anything made to 
order in Felt. 

GRIMM'S 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 
Kodaks Circulating Shaffers 
Film & Supplies Library Lifetime 
Pens & Pencils 



CHEFS 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BAHQUETS AND PARTIES 
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For Quality 



Baked Products 



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FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



out of me. Then, too, the comforts of 
the American hospital are lacking be- 
cause France shows and feels the ef- 
fects of the four years of war. The 
(treatment is good however — they se em 
to think a lot of me because I'm an 
.American. I have no reading mat- 
ter, can't talk, but spend my time 
studying French, writing letters, 
playing solitaire with a pinochle deck 
and sleeping. 

Ray Porter Campbell." 
From "College News." 



FROSH POST MORTEM 



PATRONIZE 
I. A VIE'S 
ADVERTISERS 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 

Contractors 
Luml ar and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Annville became a young rjh' 
last night when several shots 
fired that awoke the Men's "D %ere 
the whole town and two attorn^ 

The frosh were immediately pl^' 
on detective duty to bring i n ^ 
criminal, vvhile the victim shed 
beads of perspiration. Some 
green crew solicited the aid of t ] 
faculty philosophers and scientist 
others aroused the town physic^' 

The Frosh, with the detective ^ 
stincts of a true Sherlock Hol m '"" 
combed Annville but the c^im%y 
apparently :vaporated with the shot 



MAYBELLE BEAUTY SHOPpg 

Phone 141-J 

Shampooing 

Marcelling 

Scalp Treatments 

Manicuring 

Eyebrow Arching 

Comb Settings 
Nestle Permanent Waving 

MAY E. BERRY, 

38 So. Lancaster St., 
Annville, Pa. 




1 



brighten the corner where 
YOU AREN'T 

MIGHTY FEW parents are hard- 
boiled when they get to think- 
ing about Sons who are away at 
College. 

They may have found a lot of fault 
with you while you were around 
(and probably with good reason!), 
but just the same old Home Corner 
isn't half as bright as it used to be. 

Absence has cast a sort of saintly 
glow about your august person! 

We feel that your finer sensibilities 
will make you want to send some 
of that glow to the folks back home. 

And we have provided a way for 
you to send some of it home, along 
with the more cheerful notes of 
your baritone voice. 

It's only 
moments to 
Telephone. 

Just for fun . . . call Home 
tonight. 




a matter of 
home ... by 



t 




j 




HELP THE BOYS 
bR ing HOME ANOTHER 
VICTORY OCT. 19 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PATRONIZE THE 
ADVERTISERS WHO 
PATRONIZE US 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1929 



NUMBER 4 



"Y" Secures Renowned 

Men For Conference 



STUDENTS WILL DISCUSS PERTINENT TOPICS AND 
HAVE INDIVIDUAL INTERVIEWS ON 
PROBLEMS OF CAMPUS 



Leader of Discussion 
on Youth Adjustment 




JOHN 



HART, PI I. D. 



Student-faculty relations, finding 
one's place in life, relations between 
men and women on our campus — such 
are some of the problems which stu- 
dents will have the opportunity to dis- 
cuss with well known leaders at the 
"Y" Conference to be held on the 
campus October 25, 26, and 27. As 
every student has undoubtedly con- 
fronted a problem which falls within 
one of these groups, he has now the 
privilege of assistance from experi- 
enced men who have helped college 
youth on other campuses. 

Individual and group interviews 
with these men will be one of tin 
most important features of the cor 
ference. Every student is urged to 
take advantage of this opportunity 
10 solve his or her problem. 

Conference Leader 
Henry P. Van Dusen, Ph.D., the 
outstanding leader of our fall Y. Con- 
ference, is one of the most popular 
speakers of student conferences and 
colleges. He is the author bf the very 
interesting bock "In Quest of Life's 
Meanings." After being graduated 
from Princeton, he studied at Union 
Theological Seminary and in Edin- 
burgh. At present he is philosophy 
Professor at Union Theological Semi 



MISS RIFE CHOSEN AS 
BUGKNELL DELEGATE 

W - S. G. A. REPRESENTED AT 
INTERCOLLEGIATE MEET 
FOR WOMEN 



Leader of Student 
Rgi U ons' Group 




GLEE CLUB ORGANIZES 

FOR FUTURE CONCERTS 



Tryouts for the Glee Club which 
were held within the last few weeks 
have finally ended. By the sifting 
process, much new material has been 
'added to the Club. The new mem- 
bers are as follows: first tenors. 
Home, Christman and Goodman; 
and Atkins; first bass; Lebo and 
'Evancoe; second bass; Paul Keen. 
Emenheiser and Rearick. The old 
members remaining are Russel, first 
tenor; Fink, second tenor; Taylor, 
first bass; Litburger and Raudabush, 
second bass; Jacks, Pianist; and J. 
C. Keene, President. The first re- 
Conservatory. 

Rhearsals ma already in full swing 
and the manager is bn»y ,u ranging for 
the winter schedule of ( -nr. t t< 

O 



L. V. Smashes F. & M. 

6-0 on Field of Enemy 

COACH MYLIN'S CRAFT PUTS TEAM IN FIGHTING 
CONDITION; DAUB SCORES 
WINNING POINT 



WM, E. KROLL. PH. D. 

nary, New York City. All his train- 
ing and experiences have united to 
make him ?n expert leader in the 
solving of lac's mosi perplexing prob- 
lems. While in college he was claim- 
ed to be the most brilliant studeiu oi 
Princeton in the last decade, being 
valedictorian of his class, varsity de- 
bater, president of the Philadelphian 
Society (Christian Association), Phi 
Beta Kappa, chairman Undergraduate 
Council, Editor-in-Chief of Princeton 
lear Book, chairman of the Inter- 
national Policy Club, student secre- 
tary Philadelphian Society two years 
after graduation, president Students' 
Association Union Theological Semi- 
nary, etc., almost ad infinitum. 
Student Relations 
Wm. E. Kioll, Ph.D., has been on 
our campus through the medium of 
"The Intercoilegian," a student pub- 
lication to which he is a contributor. 
His writings, however, have spread 
farther than that, for he is part edi- 
tor of various books on student prob- 
lems. He has been a student secre- 
tary and at Eaglemere led the discus- 
sion on "Relations of Men and Wo- 
men" which he will head here. He 
is a Penn State graduate and, in addi- 
tion, has to his credit post graduate 
work at Unicn. He is now a minister 
at East Orange, N. J. 

(Continued on Page 2) 

O 

JUNIORS AIM FOR 

SUPERIOR PRODUCTION 



Miss Madeline Rife has been chosen 
to represent this college at the Wom- 
en 's Intercollegiate Association for 
St udent Government when it holds its 
twenty-second annual conference at 
Sucknell University, Lewisburg, Nov. 
H to 16. 

A s Lebanon Valley College is a 
member of this association, and each 
Member is entitled to send one dele- 
te, the W. S. G. A. held a short 
bu siness meeting Thursday afternoon, 
0c tober 10, at 4:30 o'clock in North 
^ al l parlor for the purpose of choos- 
m g a delegate to be sent to the con- 
fer ence. Miss Rife was the choice of 
the girls and will attend the confer- 
ee at the scheduled time. 



The Junior class play committee 
consisting of Hutchinson, Fisher, and 
Evancoe, are at present, under the di 
rection of Dr Paul Wallace, consid 
ering several plays for the annual 
junior class production. It will be 
remembered that the Junior class puts 
on its play yearly to help raise funds 
for the Quittie. This year the Jun- 
ior class happens to be the smallest 
on the campus, a fact which necessi- 
tates a most successful play if it is to 
bring in the needed remuneration. 
The class realizes its responsibility 
in this connection, and has resolved 
to produce a play hertofore unsur 
passed. When the committee reaches 
a definite conclusion, the result will 
ibe announced through the columns of 
La Vie. 



T MAKES CHRISTMAN 
LEGAL PRESIDENT 



CABINET ..PIANS- IMPROVED 
QUARTERS FOR 
ASSOCIATION 



Frederich Christman, who has been 
acting president of the Y. M. C. A. 
since the opening of school, was reaf- 
firmed in that capacity at a meeting 
of the Y. M. C. A. cabinet last Wed- 
nesday evening. 

Robert Roudabush was elected to 
fill the office of vice president vacat- 
ed by Christman but he still retains 
his former office as devotional chair- 
man. 

In a discussion regarding charms 
for the seniors, it was decided that 
they should receive them as a reward 
for the service they rendered. Plans 
were discussed for the coming "Y" 
conference to be held here the latter 
part of October. The matter of fur 
wishing the "Y" room was also con- 
sidered. A committee was appointed 
to look into the situation. 

O ■ 

CHEMISTS LOOK FORWARD 

TO INTERESTING YEAR 



bpilung au pre-game dope com- 
pletely, .Lebanon V alley outtought an 
ambitious t. and M. team and gave 
tile pride 01 Lancaster a severe joit 
when they walked away with a 0-0 
victory. 

lieiore the game began a ban Frans- 
cisco earthquake or a Florida hurri- 
cane could not have shaken the con- 
fidence ol F. and M. rooters, but be- 
ore the game was many minutes oiu, 
eleven lighting tools, representing j_. 
and inspired by tneir coacn, 
Hooks" Mylin, former F. and M. 
uminary, had changed that look 01 
confidence to one ot anxiety, and as 
the game wore on from anxiety to 
complete worry and finally to utter 
dejection. 

• • L. V. Rooters 

On the opposite side ot the heid, 
However, the Lebanon v alley sup- 
porters were 111 a continual uproar 
irom the beginning 01 the game untn 
.Daub crossed the line with the win- 
ning touchdown, when the enthusi- 
asm developed into a mud iorm ot 
hysteria. Myiin himself smiled 
broadly for a second and then re- 
turned to Ins iormer sphinx-like posi- 
tion. 

l'he game started with Lebanon 
V alley receiving. After two unsuc- 
cessful line bucks, JSiye punted. F. 
nd M. advanced for two first downs, 
but a fifteen yard penalty put a han 
to this march. Play continued around 
the middle of the neid until the latter 
part of the hrst half when F. and M. 
advanced to the hve yard line where 
they were held until the half ended. 
L. V. Brisks Up 
The second half Lebanon Valley 
played rings around F. and M. The 
locals had possession of the ball 
twenty-hve minutes out of thirty. Al- 



The Chemistry Club holds its first 
meeting tonight. Although it is one 
youngest organizations on the campus, 
it 'has excelled in many educational 
ways. The Club meets bi-monthly in 
the Chemistry lecture room. Its 
meetings are interesting and enthusi- 
asm is shown by the membeis. 

The organization has taken a step 
forward and has been able to obtain 
some noted Chemists as speakers at 
various meetings throughout the year. 
It has also obtained some unique mo- 
tion pictures which will be entertain 
iug and educational and plans to visit 
several chemical plants in the near 
future. 

The Club wishes to extend a wel 
come to old and new students who are 
interested in this line of work. 

The officers are: President, Clai 
ence Noll; Vice-President, Marioi 
Heaps; Secretary, Mildred Sailor 
Treasurer, George Becker. 



L. V. DISPOSES OF 

FOE IN MOCK CEREMONY 



bright passed with deadly accuracy 
and twice Lebanon Valley missed op- 
portunities to score when Heller and 
Zappia missed perfect passes over the 
goal line. Ihere were no individual 
stars, it was a case of eleven men 
giving their all tor the school and 
tneir coach. 

Albright returned one of Johnson s 
punts 35 yards for the longest run 01 
the game, bowman made a beautitul 
catch of one ot Albright's passes for a 
gain of 25 yards. Heiier and Cun- 
jack played wonderful games at end. 
both smeared F. and M. interference 
and threw the backheld men for loss- 
es time and again. Stone and Kazlus 
ky made several beautirui tackles 
when they were given their chance 
in the game. 

Daub Scores 

In the final quarter Lebanon Valley 
advanced the ball to the 4 yard line. 
With one down remaining a beautiful 
lateral pass, Bowman to Daub, took 
the F. and M. team completely by 
surprise and Daub crossed for the 
only score oi the game. The remain- 
der of the game Lebanon Valley play- 
ed safe. F. and M. opened an aerial 
attack but two passes were intercepted 
and their last faint hope shattered. 

(Continued on Page 4) 

PHOTOS TAKEN PRESTO 
IS '31 UOlTTlE URGE 

SENIORS PICTURE DUE 
OCTOBER 31, JUNIORS 
NOVEMBER 10 



Mr. Harpel, the photographer for 
the 1 93 1 Quittie, is active these days 
making photographs for the book. He 
is snapping the scenic photos neces- 
sary to complete the view section, 
part of which he worked up during 
the summer. The Freshmen and 
other group photos are also being 
taken care of as quickly as possible 
The Studio is prepared to take the 
individual photographs of the upper- 



A spectacular ceremony marked the 
disposal of the final remains of the 
worthy and honorable corpse of F. 

and M. Monday evening October 14. ! clasmen, and, to hasten the Quittie 



the funeral rites were pompously 
performed m the chapel at seven- 
fifteen. All the friends (as well as 
acquaintances and enemies) of the de- 
ceased were present. The mourners 
formed an impressive procession, Jo 
Rettew, being chief mourner. An elab- 
orate dissertation was made on the 
vices and virtues of the aforsaid de- 
ceased by G. Edgar Hertzler. While 
a funeral marcli was being played, 
the friends and mourners were given 
the privilege of viewing the body. 

The scene of the ceremony then 
shifted to the athletic field. After 
several talks, yells and general con- 
fusion, a huge fire was lighted, and 
the F. and M. corpse found a final 
resting ulace. 



publication, it is necessary that these 
students have their sittings soon. It 
is the aim of the staff to get all ot 
the Senior cap and gown photographs 
taken before October 31, and all of the 
Junior photos by November 10, which 
arrangement will not only facilitate 
the organization of the sections in- 
volved, but will also make a consid- 
erable reduction in the expense. The 
cut arrangement with the photogra- 
pher will be discussed in the sepa- 
rate class meetings. It is the hope 
of the staff that the student body will 
cooperate with it in doing their small 
part of the agreement. Let us repeat 
the request: All Senior photos by 
October 31, and all Junior photos by 
November 10, 1929, PLEASE! 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1020 



KSTABL-iyiililD 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under 
graduate Students ol Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDilOBIAL STAIT 

Ksthei- Any a taut, '30 . . Kditor-in-Chiel' 
uiadjs Knaub, 30 .. Associate Editor 
J. Calvin K.eene. "60 .. Associate Editor 
C. Alfred fcJhenk, '30 . Managing Editor 
BEPOKTOBIAI STATP 

\\ ai jx-n E. Eurtner, '30 

Kuth fcihruyer, '32 

.Kussen Morgan, '31 

ubi. E. Kauaabusli. '31 

General Keporters 
Alcesta Slichter. '30 .... Conservatory 

A. Edgar Siiroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Eess. '30 Clionian 

Urace .Keener, '30 Delphian 

Philip Earnes, '31 ICalozetean 

itobeit Eawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
lOdna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS ST ATI 1 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant, '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers, '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. 1'aul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 

Miss Mary K. Wiallace, English Dept. 

Dr. i'aul S. Wagner, Math. Dept, 



EA VIE COEEEGIENNE, a member 
ol the IzUercoliegiale .Newspaper Asso- 
ciation ot the Middle Atlantic States 



Subscription $1.50 per year 

.single Copies . ., io cents 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
oiiiee as seeonu class matter unaer the 
Act of March 3, 187 y. 



NEW LAMPS FOR OLD 



Six months ago an article appeared 
in Colliers on "Only the Laws have 
Lagged" which expressed the senti- 
ments of the Lebanon Valley girls 
concerning their restrictions) which 
have been modernized ill the mean 
time. 

We find most of our motor laws 
being disregarded because they are 
unfit to be obeyed. Automobile man- 
ufacturing and road making have join- 
ed hands in a progressive field while 
the statue books serve as the conserv- 
ative force checking progress. A car 
built to go no faster than the law al- 
io ws could not be sold in his country. 
Picture to yourself, if possible, an 
auto salesman vainly trying to mark- 
et a car which will not not go over 
thirty-five or forty miles an hour. How 
much success* will this law-abiding 
salesman attain. 

On the other hand is the salesman, 
who sells the car which runs eighty 
miles an hour, to be considered a 
flagrant violator of the law? Thus 
in the field of transportation we hold 
to statutes which no one obeys and 
which not even the makers have the 
slightest intention of obeying. Acci- 
dents have not been reduced by laws 
which motorests won't observe. The 
fast drivers is often the safest one 
because he is the most skillful and 
the most alert. Some men are able 
to surge on despite conventions, do 
great things, and do ^hem. safely 
even though they do violate worn out 
customs and laws. 

"We cannot expect honest govern- 
ment so long as we have our police 
enforcing laws which we refuse to 
obey". The girls are therefore fortu- 
nate this year in receiving a set of 
laws which they recognize as ones 
worthy of obeying. 

-O ■ 

HATS OFF TO STAR 

COURSE SPEAKER 



Who can claim exemption from the 
fault of sill-appreciation? "Lind- 
berg says 'we' and he is in a class by 
himself, while \yc say T and arc in 
the crowd.'* Every guilty student ap- 
preciated the joke on himself. 

Captain Upton is only the forerun- 
ner of more Star Course speakers for 
chapel. The next one is scheduled 
for the latter part of .November. The 
"Y", who are responsible lor securing 
the speakers, are to be congratulated 
on this innovation. Furthermore, 
they had ample evidence that their 
first effort was appreciated. 



-U- 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



SCOTTISH RUSSIA 

Russia is the ideal land for Scotch- 
men but not for Scotch women. Un- 
der the present plan of government 
all expenses on dates or otherwise 
are divided 50-50 between the man 
and his girl friend and, after mar- 
raige, between the man and his wile. 
This is in keeping with 'he doctrine 
of equal rights. Marriage is merely 
an incident there. Both husband and 
wife continue working afterwards 
just the same as before, even after 
there are children born in 'he fami- 
ly. If either is dissatisfied with the 
venture and wishes a divorce, he or 
she has merely to tell the other that 
they are no longer man and wife. 
In the event that there are children, 
the father heips to support them until 
they are sixteen. 



SOLD! A MILLION BOOKS 

Erich Remarque, author of "Ail 
Quiet on the Western Front", which 
has taken the reading world by 
storm, has bed to Davos, Switzer- 
land in order to obtain peace and 
a chance to answer the letters which 
are pouring in upon him. 

The latest figures give 1,571,000 as 
the number of books sold. Over a 
half of this number were sold in Ger- 
many, which is the author's native 
country, and about one seventh of 
them were sold in this country. The 
author says he may never write an- 
other book and goes on to say that 
he wrote, not to show conditions 
during the war, but primarily to show 
the effect it had upon the young men 
who served. He himself has felt the 
restlessness and inability to be hap- 
py which characterizes many of the 
men who were in that mighty con- 
flict and has traced this feeling in 
himself back to those days on the 
Western Front. 



Book Review 



MID-CHANNEL 
By Luuwig L,ewisohn 

Reviewed by R. L. '31 



Who at chapel the morning Captain 
"Dinnie" Upton addressed the stu- 
dents did not enjoy his round of jokes 
and his stimulating philosophy on the 
"game of life"? Judging by the roars 
of laughter and applause from "the 
shelf" and the main floor, the audi- 
ence was WITH the Captain. Altho 
he attacked many of our foibles, yet 
we enjoyed his vigorous personality. 

"When a fellow talks for a living, 
he often talks himself into things he 
can't talk himself out of," said the 
Captain. - The champion "line" 
throwers of the campus and the fu- 
ture salesmen from the Business Ad- 
ministration Department applauded 
along with the innocent ones. 



LATEST IN MOVIES 

The newest thing in the movies is 
the life size picture and the screen 
that will stretch entirely across the 
front of the theatre and give the pa- 
trons a larger and more natural field 
of vision than formerly. The figures 
will be the same size, but the pano- 
rama will be much increased. They 
are known as the "Granduer" pic- 
tures and will change movies almost 
as much as did the Vitaphone. A 
baseball game shows with the infield 
outfield and part of the bleachers. 
A parade ground at West Point shows 
up with the cadets, grounds, and a 
background of dormieories and ac- 
ademy buildings. With the Vita- 
phone, the effect is very realistic and 
lifelike. 



AFTER THE JUNGLE— WHAT 

Another explanation of wat bhe- 
comes of the elephant in Africa when 
they die in now advanced. Very rare- 
ly are any bodies found and the mat- 
ter of their disappearance is shroud- 
ed in mystery. The old explanation 
was that when the pachyderms feel 
death approaching they wander inland 
to a "cemetery" which has no yet 
been discovered. The new explanation 
is that when an old elephant goes into 
a river to bathe there comes a time 
when it is too weak to get out and 
as a result is drowned. Its body 
remains at the bottom of the river 
and so is never found. 



the 'twentieth Century: Age 01 
bteei, lira 01 ^>peed - - - Aevv 1 oik 
City; Cryatuiization oi the bpun ot 
that age, embodiment oi the gigantic 
material forces by which it snail be 

torever chaiacierized A Lrerman- 

born American-bred Jew, stili in spirit 
a son of the uesert, still clinging to a 
racial past embedded in the dust oi 
antiquity - - - buch is the background 
of Ludwig Lewisohn's autobiographi- 
cal MlD-CilAi\i\h.L. 

Caught in the mad rush of modern 
industrial life, he is precipitatel hall- 
reiuctantly into an unwise marriage, 
there follows an all too brief penud 
oi happiness, then the sombre shadows 
of misunderstanding and tempera- 
mental differences begin to fall over 
the pair and they finally separate. 

Cewisohn lealizes what a tragic er- 
ror he has made. He longs to rid him- 
self oi the whole sordid affair, but 
how? Between him and freedom 
stands the insurmountable barrier 01 
the Law, the Tyrant, as he views it, 
which represses, inhibits and enslaves 
those who would give their spirits the 
ireedom which it desires. 

Then he meets Thelma — the old, old 
story, as old as the history of his own 
race. His wile obtains a divorce eas- 
ily enough, for his relations with 
Thelma, relations which he at least 
has the courage not to attempt to 
conceal, leave him no grounds for 
protest had he desired to make any. 
The frightful nightmare finally ends, 
and with Theima as his wife, happier, 
as he telles us, than he has ever been 
before, he leaves for Europe where 
he can forget the past and give his 
creative genius full play. 

There in a word, is the story. From 
the standpoint of those principles 
which every American considers to be 
the bed-rock of our social order, 
Lewisohn's conduct has all the as- 
pects of a miserable blunder; it is in 
excusable. Hence, liberal of liberals 
as he is, he attacks those principles, 
especially such as relate to marriage, 
and their embodiment in our law. He 
attacks them quite frankly as Chris- 
tian principles, emphasizing at every 
turn the conflict between them and 
the principles of Judaism. For Chris- 
tianity he has nothing but condemna- 
tion and predictions of ultimate ex- 
tinction; for Christians nothing but a 
scathing denunciation for the great 
lapse between their faith and prac- 
tice. Herein lies the one great value 
of the work to a Christian reader; it 
touches the foundation of Christianty's 
greatest modern problem. It brings 
the Christian face to face with the 
full scope of the task which lies ahead, 
the task of living as he believed 
Christ taught him to live. 

All this we would expect of a Jew 
writing principally for Jews. Simi- 
larly, we are not surprised, although 
we are som.-.what boed, by his cease- 
less efforts to make aparent the ra- 
cial supremacy of the Jews. He is a 
Nationalist of the deepest dye. 
"Greece for the Greek; Rome for the 
Roman, and Palestine for the Jew," 
is his creed. His is a Nationalism 
however, that is not to be maintained 
by force, but by justice, mercy, and 
peace, for he hates war as bitterly as 
he detests modern law. Anything not 
vitally human, any force which seems 
to inhibit or repress the normal exer- 
cise of the instincts is to him an ob- 
ject for unrestrained hatred and 
criticism. 

In a word he is out of harmony 
with the Anglo-American civilization 
of the Machine Age and he feels it. 
He has made one great mistake, and 
try how he may to avoid it, there 
creeps into MTD-CHANNEL a 
steady undercurrent of apology for 
that mistake. He takes refuge behind 



MRS BENDER APPEARS 

ON CLUB PROGRAM 



Mrs Ruth Engle Bender was one 
of the artists recently appearing on 
the program of a musical tea held by 
the music committee of the Lebanon 
Women's Club Thursday afternoon, 
October 10. Mrs. Bender played 
Chopin's Scherzo by Stavenhagcn. The 
other performers were Mrs. Edith 
Franz Mills, contralto, Mrs. Pauline 
Kunst Helmcs, soprano, and Mrs. 
lrma J.Hunnmger, 'cellist 

O 

"Y" SECURES RENOWNED 

MEN FOR CONFERENCE 
(Continued from Page 1) 



"Jack" Hart Returns 

"The big boy who hasn't and won't 
grow up" and "a breath of fresh air 
which invigorates," are phrases by 
which some of our students describe 
John R. Hart, Jr., P.D. This "boy" 
is a most popular student speaker and 
leader of the Christian Associations 
at U. of P. His vivaciousness was 
manifest when, in student days, he 
played Varsity baseball. This expert 
advisor of students will take charge 
of "Finding One's Place in Life" in 
our conference. 

Faculty-Student Leader 

Paul Limbert, Ph.D., a constructive 
thinker on faculty-student relations, 
in spite of his youthfulness, is an ac- 
tive leader of students and will be on 
our own campus during the confer- 
ence week-end to lead our students 
in a discussion on problems on fac- 
ulty-student relations. He received 
his degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
at Columbia and is now a professor 
at Franklin and Marshall College 
where he has done much for students. 

O 

LA VIE ADDS NEW 

MEMBER TO STAFF 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinninn 
COLLEGE CALENDER 
nimiimiiiininiiii iiimtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

Thursday, Oct. 17— Clio hike. ' 
Friday, Oct. 18— Regular weekl 

programs of societies. 
Saturday, Oct. 19— Football 

Muhlenberg, at Allentown. 
Sunday, Oct. 20 — Y. W. C. a 

5=45- 

Tuesday, Oct. 22 — Student Praye 
Meeting in Chapel at 6:45. 



win, 




40 N. STH ST., LEBANON 
Optometrist — No Drops Used 



A DICTIONARY OP 
CHEMICAL EQUATIONS 



Contains 12.000 completed and bal. 
anced chemical equations, classified 
and arranged for ready reference. 



GRIMM'S 
Schcol Supplies 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
A Mesage of Love to the Folks 
at Home 

Ulrich's Studio 

$30 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 



Annvilh 



Pa. 



Miss Hilda Buckley has been ap- 
pointed Delphian correspondent on 
La Vie starf. She will li 11 the po- 
sition held by Grace Keener. Miss 
Keener will be ranked now anion, 
the general reporters. 

O 

A FOOTBALL MESSAGE 



F. W. GERBERICH'S STORE 



FRESH GROCERIES, 
SODAS and ICE CREAM 



29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 



Lebanon \ alley Students, atten- 
tion! ! Wake up! You have the 
spunkiest football team in all Penn- 
sylvania. And spirit! ! I don't be-' 
lieve, however, you realize that fact. , 
Here, howe\tr, is a little piece of ad- i 
vice. Such gifts don't always last long 
so take THIS one before it vanishes! 
Reserve yonr laurels and songs of 
praise for Mylin and the team! They 
deserve them! 

AN L. V. C. ROOTER. 



the racial differences between the Jew 
and the American and runs the full 
length of his keen analytical powers 
in an attempt to point out those dif- 
ferences and use them as a means of 
self-justification. In this process he 
allies himself with the modern scien- 
tist in revealing an astonishing pas- 
sion for analysis and dissection. 

But listen for a moment to the 
jvertones, the echoes that continue 
to thrill and vibrate after the first 
chords of his music (for he is unde- 
diably musical) have died away. Here 
is no modern note, here no sustained 
harmony flowering from life as the 
Gentile, the Christian conceives of it 
today. Here is the lofty poetry of the 
Hebrew soul, breathing the majesty 
of Lebanon, the solemnity of Horcb. 
all the glory and romance of the past. 
And Ludwig Lewisohn — dramatic- 
critic, author, poet, liberal — remains a 
Jew, cast forever in the mold of his 
fathers. , 

(Note: This book submitted for re- 
view through the courtesy of K. S. 
Bollman, Stationer, Lebanon, Pa. 




PRINTING 

PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 
ETC. 

AMYILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE PA> 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SAHDWICKES 

Quality Lunch 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, P*- 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS lC 
PLAYER ROW 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS nZ 
VICTOR RECORD* 
SHEET MUS ft 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Strea* 
Lebanon, Pa. 



LAVJE ( OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1929 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' 7 ' 

—JONATHAN SWIF1 



ACORN RETURNS FOR A SPELL 

To my old friends "hello" and to those who never knew me "hello too." 
, I noticed in the L. V. Collegienne which came to my oesk (no I'm not in 
"bizness." I'm still studying— harder than ever) that La Vie missed Old Acorn 
at L. V. C. Well to tell you the truth I'm glad I'm missed or 1 wouldn't 
return for a visit. This is the main purpose of my briet harangue- A. Corn 
wishes for the faculty: a very pleasant time learning new versions of different 
subjects from the students; for the students, pleasant lectures and lots of 
opportunities for sleep in the class rooms; for "Hooks" Myiin and his war- 
riors, good results in all sports for the Alumnae follow the teams — by reading 
the papers; and to his personal friends in the campus lots ot fun and goou 
times because college days don't last forever. Since i have given my purpose 
for writing this, let me state my reason. This is the fall ot the year, and 
since there are several squirrels busily engaged in laying in their winter sup- 
ply of "nuts" in close proximity to my newly acquired habitat, 1 thought that 
perhaps the squirrels might carry me off too, not oniy because of my name 
and their like for acorns, but also because I'm still one of the nuts. 
Goodbye and Good Luck, 

POOR OLD A. CURN. 

P. S. — How's the hockey team? ? 

P. P. S. — Nice score against Muhienberg Saturday. Keep holding that 
hne, fellows. j 

—LVC— 

Dear A. Corn — 

Begorry if it "aint the grand and glorious feeling'' to get a 
letter from an OLD Senior. Just had to haui in my telescope a speii and 
read and reread your lines. (.Hope 1 didn't miss any "dirt" in the mean- 
time.) I'm giving a LONG RAY for A. Corn right now. As they warned 
Caesar, so I warn you! BEWARE THE SQUIRRELS! ! ! (.animals and 
females.) JOE DA Vv GONE, the Dirt-Catcher. 

— LVC— 

"Marg." Light (.talking to several girls in the library) — "Yes, I'd like to 
join Reader's Club, but I'm scared of the Initiation. 
(Giggles from the girls.) 

"Marg." — "Well, they do have initiation, don't they?" 
Then — boisterous laughter and "Marg" got the royal He-Ha. 

— LVC— 

Dr. Butterwick in Bible Class— "Are there any questions concerning the 
Bible?" 

Grant Parsons— "Yes. 1 don't doubt the truth of the Bible, but it says 
that all living things, except those in the Ark, were destroyed by the flood, 
but what about the fish." 

— LVC— 

Eva Peck at Soph class meeting— "I suggest we give a rising vote ol 
thanks to our classmates who won the class scrap." 

Prex Shortlidge— "That's a fine idea. Will all the fellows who look part 
m the scrap please rise." 

— LVC— 

We have been asked to print no more jokes in this column about Violet 
and Fred. 

Next couple step up for the Grand Raz! 

— LVC— 

p rof. Light— What is the difference between living and non-living mat- 
ter ? Take an animal and a book for example. 

Mary Rupp— Well, an animal can produce other animals but a book can't 
Produce other books. 

—LVC— 

Morton No. 2— "Do you think that a girl should learn to love before 
twenty?" 

Red-headed Frosh — "Nope, that's too large a crowd." 

— LVC— 
Rattle! Bang! 
And then a jar! 
Here she comes! 
George Becker's car. 
— LVC- 

Next we'll have the blindfold test for kissing co-eds. 

— LVC- 

The one great trouble with a beautiful pair of dreamy eyes is you ne\er 
° w who they are dreaming about. 

— LVC— 

Familiarity breeds consent," said a pedantic lover to Joe Dawgone. 
Now, girls of the Couple Brigade, defend yourselves. 



^HIHHWHWllWIHIIHIIIIUHIHIIHUIIIimiumiHHiHHHf 

| Alumni Notes 

. ."iii"ii'.iiiii.iiiiiii,iiii,iiiiiiiiiiii,iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiinm 

Aews nas leacned us ot an audi 
tionai ammui marriage mat oi 
Miss .Marion iuess and Mr. James 
Oordon bmr. iiiey were married 
Saturday, October 12, at Ephrata, he 
bride's home. Airs. Star was grad- 
uated with the class of '26 and Mr. 
Siar wan that of '27. .Both Mr .and 
iVirs. Star are now teaching in the 
Annville High School. 

Among the crowd of spectators at 
the L. V . F. & M. game were 
many aiuinni. it is encouraging to 
see that they are showing a great 
interest in their Alma Alaler 111 Ath- 
letics as we'll as in other phases ol 
her work. 



Miss Catharine Craven '28, has ac 
cepted a position this year as instruc- 
tress 111 English at the Swarthmore 
High School, Swarthmore, Pa. She 
is also the coach of debating and 
dramatics at this schools. 

O 



HIKERS REVEL AT "Y" 

• • FEAST IN WOODS 



Ihursuay evening about 200 fellows 
and co-eos strolled to ivautman's 
woods where an enjoyable wiener 
roast was held, The event sponsored 
jointly by the Y. .M and i . W. C. A., 
proved a success in every respect, in 
the first piace there was plenty to eat 
— wieners, marshmaliows and cocoa 
milk; secondly it was a perfect even- 
ing sans cold and dampness; thirdly, 
the speakers were all very consider- 
ate, limiting their speeches to the reg- 
ular introduction, "unaccustomed as 
1 am to public speaking," and then 
closing very abruptly. 

Madame Green and Miss Myers, the 
chaperones, were called on for speech- 
es and responded very graciously but 
briefly. William Myers, Alex Grant, 
Ruth Shroyer and Pat Clemens repre- 
senting respectively the four classes, 
made brief remarks. The event turn- 
ed into a "pep'' meeting with Hertz- 
ler having charge. The woods echoed 
and reechoed with college songs and 
cheers. Finally couples started 
strolling slowly homeward with plenty 
of material for diaries and memory 
books. 

O 

DR. WALLACE HOST TO 

ENGLISH ASSISTANTS 



Dr. and Mrs. Paul A. W. Wallace 
gave a formal dinner Friday evening, 
October nth, for the English Depart- 
ment. Among those present were: 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, Miss Nelda 
Spatz, of the ciass of '28, the Misses 
Anne Gordon, Pauline Schaeffer, and 
nn Hershey. 

O 

ARTISTS GUESTS 

OF WOMEN'S CLUB 



Jin and About the Literary Societies! 

'•Niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii; iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiinunl 

IMMORTAL POETS RETURN j EX-PRES LDENT TALKS 

TO GARDEN OF DELPHI ( AT KALO SESSION 



Misses Leah Miller and Mildred My- 
ers were the guest artists at the open- 
ing meeting of the Women's Club of 
Middletown, Thursday afternoon, 
October 10. The speaker was Mrs. 
R. J. Engle, of Palmyra, with Mrs. 
Kathryn Steckel presiding. A social 
lour followed the program. 



Fme assortment of Watches, Rings 
Chains, & etc. 
Ntw Century Chimming Grand- 
father Clocks 

LIGHTS JEWELRY 
STORE 
51 West Main St. ; 



in a beaut.ful setting of a moonlit 
garden, Deita Lambda Sigma Society 
presented its eighth opening for the 
new girls in Deiphian Hall Monday, 
Oct. ii, at seven-thirty o'clock. A 
trellis intertwined with leaves, a car- 
pet ot grass with a path of stones, 
cushions, garden benches, all suc- 
ceeded in giving a picture not easily 
forgotten. 

'ihe president, dressed in a quaint 
old-fashioned costume, welcomed each 
guest, new girls, old girls and faculty 
as they were admitted into the room 
While the guests waited for the en- 
tertainment to begin, they were de^ 
lighted by selections on the piano 
Everyone having entered into the 
spirit of the affair, the president gave 
her welcoming speech and cordially 
asked everyone to enter with her into 
the Garden of Delphi. 

The theme of the story was beauti 
ful. She, a young girl in love with 
an artist, did not realize the depths 
nor feelings of an artist and there- 
fore she was not happy. She was try- 
ing to grasp something she knew not 
what, but she wanted to understand. 

Leaving her house-guests to enter- 
tain themselves for awhile, she sought 
the solace ol the garden and there 
gave herself up to the out of doors 
and to memory. While she is in the 
garden her house-guests make merry 
and the noise is heard in the garden, 
but she hears it not. 

First, the fairie queen with her 
three faries come and put her in a 
trance. They bring to her many, 
many things, they stir her memory. 
Amy Lowell appears in her stiff bro- 
caded gown and gives her "Patterns." 
While she is yet in the distance go- 
ing down the walk, the spirit of Wil- 
liam W r ordsworth suddenly comes be- 
fore her and utters his "On the Sea- 
Shore Near Calais." 

The rollicking ballad, "On the 
Bonny, Bonny Bank of Loch 
Lomond," is next heard and she lis- 
tens closely to the hapy strains of the 
song. As the last notes die away, 
her mother steps out from the porch 
and sitting beside her daughter she 
tells her Van Dyke's "The Blue Flow- 
er." Ere she is gone John Masefield 
comes forth and gives his "Road- 
ways." Then the "Blue Danube" is 
heard in the distance. She, suddenly 
standing up, comes to some realiza- 
tion. She stands and lifts her head 
high and repeats the last few lines of 
Henley's "Invictus." 

The Soul of the Artist in the beau- 
tiful notes of ""May Night" speaks to 
her and after he has finished play- 
ing, he comes to the arbor and seeing 

(Continued on Page 4) 



alo met last Friday evening for the 
usual literary bession. The program 
was especially interesting due to the 
fact that there (were three former 
ivalo Presidents in attendnace — L. 
Archie Luiz, Myles Kiehner and Rev. 
Bingham. Each contributed to the 
success of tiie evening. 

After devotions, Pres. Rhoads spoke 
a word 01 welcome to the new stu- 
dents. He urged them to attend the 
meetings of both the Societies so as 
lo acquaint themselves with the re- 
spective merits of each. 

A banjo solo by YVhhard impressed 
everyone by its silence. His excuse 
was that lie was "hors d' combat" 
after the class scrap. Barnes gave 
a brief book-report on "All Quiet on 
the Western Front." Clark enter- 
tained with a piano solo. Kalo is 
glad to see her old friend back again 
after his illness. 

Rev. Bungham told a few jokes 
and explained just what Kalo means 
to an old Alumnus. Russel E. Moyer 
gave a clever translation of Kalo's 
motto}; |Palnia Non Sine Pulnere," 
The meeting closed with one of Kalo's 
old traditions — another bull session. 

O 

PROFS REMINISCE 

AT PHILO MEETING 



"Reminiscences of Frosh Days" was 
the general theme of Philo program, 
Friday evening, October 11. Two pro- 
fessors, Prof. Grimm and Dr. Bender, 
spoke on this subject. 

The meeting was opened with devo- 
tions. This was followed by a musi- 
cal number. Prof. Grimm then en- 
tertained with his reminiscences. A 
quartette by Sitlinger and Company 
preceded Dr. Bender's speech. As a 
closing number Hertzler led in a 
"pep" meeting for the F. and M. 
game. A social period followed the 
program. 

O 

DEBATING TEAMS 

WILL SOON FORM 



Prof. Stokes, coach for the debat- 
ing teams, will have a girls' team and 
a boys' team this year, perhaps us- 
ing only one affirmative and one neg- 
ative team. The inter-collegiate de- 
bating question has not as yet been 
decided but a meeting to decide the 
same was scheduled for last Satur- 
day in Harrisburg. The prospects 
this year are good, but a repesenta- 
tion from the new students at the try- 
out is desired by the coach. 



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*>AGE FOUR 



LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, io*9 



First Star Course Concert 




John Ross Reed and Company 

Star Course Intertainers for Monday evening, October 28th This group of singer 
ic' tiding scenes from he picturesque operas and novelty features. 



varitv of offerin/s 



L. V. SMASHES F. AND M. 

6-0 ON FIELD OF ENEMY 
(Continued from Page 1) 



L. V. 

left end Cunjack 
left tackle Kelly 
left guard Wood 
center Reese 
right guard Lechthaler 
right tackle Bartolet 
right end Heller 
quarterback Albright 
left halfback Daub 
right halfback Zappia 
Britton fullback Nye 

Substitutions— L. V.: Light for 
Nye, Katzlusky for Wood; Patrizio 
for Albright. Bowman for Zappia, 
Stone for Bartolet. 

O 



F. & M. 

Fisher 

Mazloff 

Schutt 

Zehrer 

Lawrence 

Mikos 

Oakes 

Horst 

Eman 

Altzman 



^iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiinniiiiiiiiiiii 
I L V. 15 YEARS AGO j 

SllllllllllllllUlllmlllllllllll^l |lllllll,lll,lllll,l,lllll,lllll,,1,l ^ 
STATE BATTERS L. V. 

IN 13-0 SCORE 



LINCOLN BIOGRAPHY IS 

THEME FOR READERS 

In a very interesting hour, the 
Readers' Club meet Wednesday even- 
ing, October 16, at the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. Wallace. The subject, Sand- 
burg's "Life of Lincoln," proved to 
be a choice topic for discussion. 

Mr. Eshelmann gave an intimate 
picture of the great statesman in a 
talk on "A Glimpse of the Life of 
Lincoln." Dorothy Heister followed 
this with a delightful and interesting 
discussion of "Lincoln as We Know 
Him." As Sandburg's "Life of Lin- 
coln" was the one chosen, Billie 
Coleman gave a most interesting por- 
trait of Lincoln as Saudburg knew 
him. When everyone had compared 
and discussed Lincoln for several 
minutes, Mary Ax completely changed 
the atmosphere of the meeting by 
giving a splendid report on the Book 
of the Month, "Good Companions'* 
by Priestley. 

O 

HINT TO BACHELORS 

Fritz Gross, Vienesse architect, has 
designed a one-roomed house. In 
stead of an ordinary house having 
partitions or sliding doors, furniture 
marks the divisions. It has four 
parts— dining room, studio, bed room 
and parlor. Each part occupies one 
corner of the room. The house was 
designed especially for bachlors or 
for small families. 

O 

A quiet, friendly time was enjoyed 
by those who attended the regular 
meeting of the Y. W. C. A. Sunday 
evening. An inspiring poem, placed on 
an easel in the center of the room 
was read by Ruth Cooper during the 
course of the meditation hour. The 
remainder of the progam was made 
up of reading by Madaline Rife, soft 
victrola music, singing, and individual 
prayer. 



In the game played just a little 
more than fourteen years ago with 
Penn State the L. V. boys went down 
to defeat, although the game was well 
fought, by the score of 13-0. There 
was good playing on the part of the 
members of both teams and every 
inch of ground gained by Penn was 
contested by the White and Blue 
players. 

The State boys played the gs 
safe all through, and after the last 
touchdown, introduced a large number 
oi substitu:es so that their varsity 
men might not be injured and there- 
by their team be weakened tor the 
next Saturday's game with U. of P. 
their detense was unusually strong, 
enabling men to make only two nrst 
downs. Each member ol the team 
deserved much credit and were to 
be congratulated. 

"College News' 



FROSH, SOPHS MEET 

IN ANNUAL TUG 



The annual tug o' war between the 
freshmen and the sophomores is 
scheduled for either next Wednesday 
or Thursday afternoons at the Quit- 
tie. 

Both teams are (doing .extensive 
training the sophomores coached by 
Edgar Shroyer, and the freshmen 
by Fred Christman. The strength of 
each it is said, is about equal, so that 
a strugle almost as that of last year's, 
may be anticipated. The strength of 
either team was so well balanced, 
that darkness hastened the decision 
after almost two hours of pulling. 

The sophomores have left the 
Quittie for two consecutive years 
with the rope of victory. In 1926, 
however, he frosh astonished their 
class foe by a decisive drag through 
the Quittie. 



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IMMORTAL POETS RETURN 

TO GARDEN OF DELPHI 

(Continued from Page 2) 



her apparently sleeping, although she 
is not, he murmurs those well-knowr. 

nes. "She Walks in Beauty," 1> 
Byron. 

As this face disappears from the 
trellis, a light is lit and the words 
shine out, "Know Thyself,'' Delta 
Lambda Sigma's motto. She has at 
last found out her true self and she 
goes on her way rejoicing. 

After this scene, the house-guests 
rush out in the audience where the 
young men give to each guest a beau- 
tiful American Beauty rose bud and 
the young women give each new gin 
a white silk handkerchief with the 
Greek insignia painted in the corner. 

Delicious refreshments were served 
after which everyone entered into 
making it a very social evening. The 
girls danced and sang and had a very 
good time. Each one there had a very 
delightful evening and enjoyed the en- 
teertainment. 

Following is the cast 111 the order 01 
ilieir appearance: 

House Guests: Gladys Hershey, 
Ruth Shroyer, Hestor Thompson, 
Ruth Marcn, Elizabeth Engie and 
h.va Peck. 
She — Ruth Cooper. 
Fairie Queen — Bernita Strebig. 
Fairies of Memory — Mary Bixler, 
Dorothy Thompson and Kathryn 
Yingst. 

Amy Lowell — Caroline Fisher. 
William Wordsworth — Marie Gel- 
wicks. 

Robert Burns — Dorothy Heister. 
Her Mother— Hilda Buckley. 
John Maseheld — Sara Ensminger. 
The Soul of the Artist— "May 
Night" — Mary K. Goshert. 
He — Dorothy Boyer. 



yjiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiii 

I L. V. TEN YEARS AGO f 

|ii»i»iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimii!iiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiifniii 

A PROF DEFENDS EXAMS 



Ten years ago there appeared u, 
the College News an editorial 0n 
"exams". In reply to the editorial 
one of the Prefessors gave the fol- 
lowing fine points to prove the value 
of examinations to a student 

To force him to renew the work 
of a given period and thereby co- 
ordinate it as a whole better than 
he could co-ordinate it in daily as- 
signmens. 

To develop the ability to success- 
fully meet the demands of tasks f 
unusual difficulty and he important 
knowledge acquired as seperate topics 
at disconnected intervals and com- 
bining them into an organized and 
unified form. 

If the honor system is used, as a 
personal test for the student of the 
strength and weakness of the | ele- 
ments of his own character. 

To learn the value of habitual study 
in acquiring a clear usuable know- 
ledge of a subject. 

If the examination questions are 
of a nature tc require thinking and 
not mere restating of memorized facts, 
the examination will teach the student 
the uselessness of cramming and the 
value of thoughtful study. 

From "College News" 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



BE SURE TO ATTEND 
THE CONFERENCE 
OCTOBER 25-27 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER, 24, 1929 



CONFERENCE DRAWS 
NATIONAL INTEREST 

STUDENTS FROM ADJACENT 
COLLEGES "WILL OBSERVE 
NEW PROJECT 



The local Y. M.-Y. W. C. A.'s have 
succeeded in placing Lebanon Valley 
on an equal basis, if not beyond the 
average school of our class, because 
of our new conference project. That 
it is an entirely new and unique step 
in student life is evidenced by the 
fact that the National "Y." Council 
is watching every move in the devel- 
opment of our plan and was request- 
ed that a written record be submit- 
ted, containing all the steps taken, the 
difficulties encountered, and the rela- 
tive progress made. The success of 
our Conference will doubtless be a 
forward stride for our Y's and our 
whole college. 

National Interest 

In addition to the interest mani- 
fested in our local undertaking, the 
National Council has also asked Leb- 
anon Valley to be represented on a 
National Committee planning for a 
studet conference. This honor has 
never before been accorded our 
school. 

Students from other colleges are 
also interested and happy to accept 
the various invitations which have 
been issued to nearby schools. This 
contact on our own campus will 
mean much for our present student 
body, not counting the benefit to the 
college as a whole. 

The Program 

The program planned appears in 
detail below: 

(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

CHEMISTS LAUNCH 

PROMISORY YEAR 



Setting the pace for extra-curricu- 
lar activities for the 1929-30 term, the 
Chemistry Club began the new year in 
a DUs 'ness-like manner in adapting the 
constitution recently drawn up by 
Greiner. It was read before the 
Club at its first meeting held last 
Thursday evening, at which also other 
ia Uers of importance were discussed. 

According to the new constitution, 
active membership in the club will be 
"mited to students who have had one 
>ear of College Chemistry. Freshmen 
and other students not fulfilling this 
re quirement arc most welcome at the 
naeet ings, but will not be allowed vot- 
fS Privileges. The Club will meet 
° n alternate Thursdays starting on 
October 31, at which time the first 
Pf p Par ? d P r °S r am will be given. 
Resident Noll outlined the work for 

e year, thj aim of which will be to 

^eate more interesting and profiable 

t ' ] later 'al for the Club members, with 

le Possibilities of visits to laborator- 

ih ' by prominent chemists, and 

1 ° Vln & pictures of chemical inter- 
est 

Th 

e secretary's and treasurer's re- 
U r rt p WPre " iven by Miss Saylor and 
CQ ' Re cker respectively. Elections of 

Za ^ 1 ! 160 c ' iairrnen resulted in Mr. 
^PP'a's being elected to head the 
p mbershin mmmittee, and Mr. Mor- 
l "e program. 



NUMBER 5 



CLIO GIRLS VISIT 

ENCHANTED FOREST 

Into an enchanted forest where fair- 
ies danced and witches hobbled at 
midnight Clio led their guests, the 
new students, on Wednesday evening, 
October 23. 

Hansel and Gretel, famous in leg- 
end, came forth from the Land of Im- 
agination to give a phantastic picture 
out of the lives. Into a forest, al- 
ready growing dark, Hansel and his 
sister, Gretel, entered merrily. Soon, 
however, they discovered they had 
lost their way. They became aware 
of lurking men, who were only tree 
trunks, and of grinning faces which 
were only owls. A little old man 
emerged from the shadows and from a 
bag hrew sand over the children. They 
became drowsy and after praying for 
the fairies lo come and guard them 
while they slept them lie down and 
are soon fast asleep. 

From the deep shadows a group 
of fairies come to dance about the 
sleeping children and covered them 
with gossamei scarfs from fairyland. 
Fairy of he Dawn found the children, 
disposed the night and mists and bade 
them wake up. 

The gobbiing, hobbling witch of the 
enchanted forest in her rambles found 
the children in the morning. She 
charms them with a "Hocus, Pocus" 
spell. But Gretel, while she slept, 
was given a white leaf by one of the 
fairies which would kill any evil spirit 
ii touched. Gretel touched the witch 

(Continued on Page 4) 
O 



frosh 1. q:s secured 
from opening tests 



WOMEN FAR SURPASS MEN IN 
FINAL SCORES COMPILED 
BY DR. REYNOLDS 



For the fifth successive year the 
Department of Education and Psy- 
chology has given a standardized in- 
telligent test to the incoming stu- 
dents. The Intelligence Test 
prepared by the Department of Psy- 
chology of Ohio State University, 
was again used this year. 

Ninety-two Freshmen took the test 
during the Freshman Week preced- 
ing the opening of school. They were 
given and the results compiled under 
the supervision of Dr. Reynolds and 
his assistants. The scores have been 
carefully checked and compared with 
those of preceding years. 

Although the same kind of a test 
is used every September, it varies 
slightly in contents and is supposed 
to present the same difficulties from 
year to year. However,, the test used 
for the present Freshmen seems to 
have been more difficult than those 
of preceding years. This appears from 
the very great drop in the median 
of this year as compared with other 
years. The results from all the co'- 
leges which gave the test must be 
obtained first before this conclusior 
is taken as authentic. Tf the mcd : an 
scores from ether colleges and uni- 
versities are as high as former years, 
(Continued on Page 4) 



STAR COURSE WILL 

PRESENT FINE TALENT 



John Ross Reed, internationally 
known baritone, Columbia recording 
artist and popular actor, heading a 
company of singers who are not only 
splendid musical artists but delight- 
ul entertainers, will appear in the 
Conservatory, Monday night at 8 p. 
m. in the first star court number. 

With a cast of outstanding singers, 
scenery that is a marvel of complete- 
ness and costumes rich in the splen- 
dor of many lands, scenes from grand 
operas and original musical sketches 
will be presented with amazing artis- 
try. The remarkable scenic and light- 
ing effects arc so complete that they 
have esablished this company in a 
place by itself. 

In a program including such offer- 
ings as scenes from "Madame Butter- 
fly", "The Pagoda of Flowers". 
"Pagliacci"' and "Carmen", the com- 
pany also weaves in the cleverest of 
entertainmet.t features. Humor and 
laughter will find rightful place. A 
Russian "Chauve Souris" scene will be 
an excellent example of humor de- 
lightfully presented, while a Norwe- 
gian folk scene promises a rare com- 
bination of music and entertainment. 
A dramatic cathedral-song presenta- 
tion will be particularly effective. 

Mr. Reed has sung in grand opera 
in America and on the Continent. The 
other members of the company have 
been personally selected by Mr. Reed; 
Dagny Jensen Reed, soprano, Bella 
Gerard, mej-zo-soprano, Buda Orth, 
violinist, pianist, contralto and Pau 
Beske, presentor and character artist. 

Tickets are 75 cents each, reserved 
seats extra. Season tickets for the 
four numbers are $2.00. The reserved 
seat chart will open at Grimm's Book 
Store tomorrow morning at 9 a. no. 

On commenting on this company 
Mr. Marsh of Ford City says, "The 
John Ross Reed Company appeared 
'here Friday evening, Oct. 18th, in the 
first number of our Lyceum Course. 
The number was one of the very best 
twe have had. The audience, the larg- 
est in the history of the city, was 
(Continued on Page 4) 

O ■ 

DR. DERICKSON RETURNS 

TO ANNVILLE IMPROVED 



Dr. Dericksori has returned to his 
home in Annville after having spent 
several months at his cottage in Mt. 
Gretna, recuperating from a severe 
illness with which he was stricken last 
year. 

Due to his state of health, he is 
Inot able to take over his classes this 
year. However, he is not forgotten 
by the students and everyone is glad 
to hear that he is rapidly improving 
and may be with us next year. 
O ■ 



FACULTY NOTES 



During the past week Dr. Gossard 
has been away on business trips. He 
joined his family on Saturday in Bal- 
timore, where they spent the week 
end. 

Madame Green left for Baltimore 
last Friday afternoon. She spent a 
very pleasant week-end with her 
daughter, Miss Yvonne Green. 



RECOGNITION SERVICE 

HELD FOR NEW GIRLS 



In a very impressive service, the 
Y. W. C A. held its Recognition 
Meeting, Sunday evening, Oct. 20, 
1929, in North Hall Parlor. The 
room was dimly lighted and at the one 
end of the parlor a small altar was 
set up, where three large candles were 
burning. 

Each new girl was kid into the room 
by her big sister. A choir of he Y. 
W. Ci A. sang "I Would Be True." 
After this tthe choir entered the room, 
Ruth Cooper leading them. They pro- 
ceeded to the altar where each knelt. 
They grouped themselves around the 
"•able where Ruth Cooper explained the 
spirit of Y. W. C. A. and what the 
recognition service stood for. Alary 
Elizabeth Stevens illustrated "Young" 
by reciting a fitting poem of youth, 
Grace Keener followed by proclaim- 
ing the virtue of "woman," Pauline 
Shaffer talked of Christian training 
and Alary Rank of the need for coop- 
eration. Ruth Cooper fitted these to- 
gether to form Young Women's 
Christian Association, the organiza- 
tion to which every girl of L. V. C. 
belongs. 

( As Mary K. Goshert accompanied 
Alcesta Siichter on the violin, playing 
soft music, each "big sister ' led her 
"little sister ' to the altar table where 
she was formally recognized as a 
member of the Y. W. C. A. and was 
(Continued on Page 4) 
O ■ 

'The Firth" chu*en 

AS ANNUAL ULlU PLAY 

ENTIRE GIRLS' CAST WILL 
STAGE OPENING DRAMA 
OF SCHOOL YEAR 



The Clionian Literary Society is 
formulating elaborate plans for its 
fifty-ninth anniversary which will be 
celebrated November 23. The play 
for the evening has been selected, 
which will be "The Piper" by Joseph- 
ine Preston Peabody. This delight- 
ful drama was considered for previous 
productio on the campus but was re- 
jected due to its large cast and the 
even distribution of male and female 
characters. 

Clio is undertaking to stage the play 
with an entire girls' cast which is a 
unique achievement on the campus 
and was a Clionian triumph four years 
ago in "The Kiss Enchanted". "The 
Piper" is based on the legend of "The 
Pied Piper of Hamelin''. It is full of 
dramatic possibilities and will open 
the season of dramas with quite a 
different type of play. 

Tryouts were held at various times 
this week under the direction of Miss 
Mary Kathryn Wallace, who will 
coach he play. Although many of the 
cast have been selected, a number of 
parts will be vacant until all new girls 
joining the society have an opportun 
ity to be in the cast. 

The committee which selected the 
play consisted of Esther Angstadt, 
chairman, Anne Gordon, Marie Ehr- 
gott, Ann Agusta Esbenshade, and 
Gladys Knaub. 



MUHLENBERG TAKES 
VICTORY FROM L. V. 

FORM SHOWN IN F. & M. 
BATTLE IS LACKING IN 
LOCAL GRID WARRIORS 



Failing miserably to show the form 
that they bads hown against F. and 
M., Lebanon Valley took an unexpect- 
ed defeat from Muhlenberg 7-0. The 
first half was entirely Lebanon Val- 
ley's, the Blue and White nearly scor- 
ing three touchdowns to Muhlen- 
berg's one, but the second half Muh- 
'enberg came back and played the lo- 
cals to a standstill. 

A break in the game gave Muhlen- 
berg their touchdown in the third 
quarter. The ball was on Lebanon 
Valley's 45 yard line and the fourth 
down. Muhlenberg attempted a pass 
but there was no receiver near it. The 
Leba non Valley safety left it ground. 
The umpire claimed L. V. had inter- 
fered with the receiver and gave 
Muhlenberg a first down on the five 
yard line. A pass to Weber netted 
Muhlenberg a touchdown and the try 
for extra point was successful. 

In the final quarter Lebanon Valley 
made a desperate effort to score: Two 
long passes, Albright to Heller, placed 
the ball on the eight yard line but the 
advance was stopped when Muhlen- 
berg held for downs and immediately 
after that the game ended. 

A strong opponent will be met next 
week in Georgetown and it is hoped 
tnat the boys will snap back to form 
ind make 1 creditable showing. 

O 

BOOKS ON CONFERENCE 

SUBJECTS AVAILABLE 



Books on subjects pertinent to the 
"V" Conference theme, by such au- 
thors as Sherwood Eddy and "Pit" 
Dusen, have been secured by tne Lit- 
erature Committee of which Pauline 
Schaeffer has charge. Such books will 
be on sale in the reading room of the 
Conservatory during the Conference. 
Students will thus be given a chance 
to be enlightened on vital subjects of 
tthe day. It is hoped that they will 
avail hemselves of this opportunity to 
Miink with our world leaders of youth. 

O 

PHILO GROUP SEE 

PLAY IN NEW YORK 

Prof. P. A. W. Wallace visited New 
York last Saturday with a group of 
Philos to see "Journey's End," a play 
of the World War, at Henry Miller's 
,Theatre on 43rd Street. 

The group left Annville Saturday 
morning and returned after the show, 
arriving at school 5 a. m. Sunday 
morning. 

The play was thoroughly enjoyed 
by each one in the party. Altho it 
had a very .-imple stage setting, rep- 
resenting the inside of a dug-out, and 
altho no one part or actor stood out, 
yet it left a profound impression upon 
fach one that he had been in the 
dug-out with the men and knew and 
iked each one of them. In its class 
I is probably a paramount drama. 

The ones in the party besides Dr. 
Wallace were John Snyder, William 
Myers, Edgar Hertzler and Calvin 
Keene. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER, 24, 1929 



|£a: Hie Caltegmttte 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
uiaujs ivnaut), '30 .. Associate Editor 
J. <~aivin i^eene, '30 .. Associate Editor 
C. Aiired anenK, '30 . Managing Editor 

Grace Keener. '30 

nanea to, ±>urtner, '30 

iiuui bhroyer, "iz 

imsaea Morgan. '31 

.udl L. iiauuaDush, '31 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A. ii.agar snroyer, '30 Athletics 

iiilua iiess. '30 Ciionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

x-niiip i^ariies, '31 Kaiozetean 

Kobert Kawhouser, '32 . Phiiokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers, '30 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
iviiss iviary K. Wallace, Engnsli Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 

LA V IE CULLEGIENNE, a member 
of tne lnierconegiate iNewspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

single Copies 10 cents 

bUDScription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
olnce as seconu ciass matter unuer tne 
A<;i of March 3, 18 it. 



LIBRARY SOCIALIZING 



As college students we often want 
to pride ourselves upon the iact that 
we are entirely capable of judging our 
own conduct. VVe resent higher au- 
thorities when they call our attention 
to our actions which to them appear 
childish, but do we ever stop to con- 
sider the many things we do on the 
campus which allow criticisms from 
older people. The one thing in par- 
ticular which we students persist in 
doing is socializing in the library. 

(Juite naturally we recognize the 
reason for the existence of our li- 
brary but vve do not coordinate our 
aim in going there with the reason toi 
its existence. The dormitories are not 
conducive to intense study during the 
day and so many of us turn to the 
library as a place of refuge since we 
know that definite rules forbid inter 
ruption at that place. However, when 
we once reach the library we quite 
forget our reason for going and im 
Mediately begin a lively chat much to 
the disturbance of the person seated 
across the table. Those in charge ot 
the library are as human as we are 
and detest the policemanlike job of 
enforcing rules which we disobey at 
random. 

How much better it would be if we 
were all to thing of the Golden Rule 
when working in the library. Not 
only does the talkative student annoy 
others but he quite likely prevents 
others from obtaining the book which 
he pretends to use. 

How many of us have not at some 
time or other left the library to seek 
a quiet place for study? Then again 
how many of us have at some time 
or other forced some one else to leave 
•the library due to distractions? 

The library has a definite duty to 
perform and that duty is not to pro- 
vide a socializing place. Last year 
with the extension of the library prop- 
er a room on the second floor was set 
aside as a comfortable place for all 
necessary group discussions. In case 
some have forgotten* this convenience, 
it might be well to remind them of 
it. It is only a matter of form to ob- 
tain the key to this room from the 
acting librarian. We would strongly 
recommend the use of it and the pres- 
ervation of the library proper as a 
place for intense study. 

O 

TRUTH ABOUT SOCIETIES 



We have, on our campus, four lit- 
erary societies. Let us present to our 
readers two pictures of these societies 
—pictures that are equally true, we 



believe, for any one or for all four. 
I. In the Beginning 

The first picture is of a Friday 
night on our campus in late Septem- 
ber or early October. An enticing 
announcement has been read in chapel 
inviting all new students who desire 
a good time to attend the meeting of 
said society and ending with an ap- 
peal to rue heart via the stomach 
route by the one word — "eats." The 
meeting is held. All progresses ac- 
cording to the strict rules of parlia- 
mentary law. The best talent of '.ht 
society is presented. Speeches arc 
heard from Seniors or graduates tell 
ing what that particular society has 
done for them in contributing 50 per 
cent of their college education and 
advising all new students to "think 
on these things", hoping that it won't 
occur to the student that in all prob- 
ability the other societies are pre- 
senting he same "dope". Then comes 
that part of the program which is 
chiefly responsible for the presence of 
a large number of the old members — 
the refreshments. All is the picture 
of good-will. The new student's 
hand is wrung time after time, as the 
old students try to impress her or 
him with the spirit of sisterliness or 
brotherliness which exists in that par- 
ticular society. Thus appears the first 
picture. 

II. In the End 

Now the second. This one is of 
the latter part of May — again a Fri- 
day night. The announcement may 
or may not be made in chapel. If it 
is it is a simple announcement of 
time and place with an ominous omis- 
sion of the "eats". The program does 
not make its appearance until the 
Thursday or maybe even Friday on 
which it is to be given. A handful of 
the "faithful" attend and half-hearted- 
ly listen to 1 program on which per- 
haps half the participants fail to ap- 
pear. 

These two are the pictures which 
we offer for your inspection. Over- 
drawn? Perhaps, altho we believe 
they are typical. In between the two 
are jealousies, "catishness", politics, 
and feelings of enmity, particularly 
among the girls, that would not exist 
without the societies. What can we 
who are responsible for this condi- 
tion, do to improve it? 

III. Are There Remedies? 
First, let us consider the fundamen- 
tal purpose for which they were or- 
ganized. It is-, according to the Con- 
stitution of each, the training of its 
members in literary culture, primar- 
ily. Then why does each insist on 
trying to rush all new students, re- 
gardless of their desire for literary 
training, into its society? Is it not 
here where the trouble lies? This 
method of running the societies is 
foolish and defeats the very purpose 
for which each was supposedly or- 
ganized, for when a society has over 
fifty members at the most it cannot 
possibly function properly as a liter- 
ary training society. This is true be- 
cause, aside from the fact that the in- 
dividual members can take part on 
the program only several times a 
year, it inevitably develops that the 
majority, not feeling any responsi- 
bility, will lose interest and a half 
dozen will be left to carry on. In a 
smaller group it is just as inevitable 
that each should feel personal re- 
sponsibility in the functions of the 
society and each would work toward 
that end. 

A Spade is a Spade 
Of course it is certain that some- 
jone will say that the societies as they 
now are fill a social need. If this is 
true, why is it necessary to call them 
"literary" societies? If they are to be 
social clubs why not call them that 
and do away with this pretense? Let 
us call a spade a spade. 

On the other hand, why should the 
Literary Societies receive any more 
attention than the Reader's Club or 
Glee Club or Chemistry Club? Each 
of them is a specialized organization 
'raining in a certain line, so is it 
necessary that everyone be pressed to 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



Week-end trips away from college 
are blamed by Pres. Angell of Yale 
for the lack of school and class spirit 
at that institution. Many of the stu- 
dents go to New York over the week- 
ends when they might be having con- 
tact with the other members of their 
class. He fortells ne time, after avia- 
tion becomes more developed, when 
they will go to Palm Beach instead 
of such local places as Boston and 
Manhattan. Other reason„ that he 
gives for the breakdown of class sipric 
are fraterniies, large classes and the 
elective system. 



The National Sunday School Union 
of England has decided tnat the un- 
expougated version of the Bible as 
we now have it is not fit reading for 
the children. As a result of this de- 
cision they have blue penciled it and 
now present the younger generation 
,with the expurgated edition. The 
! story of Joseph and Potipnar has 
been rewritten, the Prodigal Son story 
has been considerably softened and 
;the account of the woman taken in 
adultery has been entirely omitted. 
Prigishness still exists. 



Finally John Coolidge and Florence 
Trunbull are man and wife. It was a 
"quiet, little wedding" with only 
about 2000 people in attendance. The 
police lines were broken down but 
all ended happily as Mr. and Mrs. 
John Coolidge left for their noney- 
j moon to Trumbull Camp at Moore- 
head Lake, Maine. 



Conservatory 
Instructor 




flllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll,,,!^ ^ 

COLLEGE CALENDER I 



Friday, Oct. 25— Fall "Y" Confere nc 
Opens. 

Saturday, Oct. 26— Fall Conferen c 
Ladies' Auxiliary Food Sale 
South Hall Parlour, 10-12 a. m 

Saturday, Oct. 26. — Georgetown 
Washington, D. C. 

Sunday, Oct. 27— "Y" Conference 
Closes. 

Monday, Oct. 28 — Star Course. 
Tuesday, Oct. 20— Student Pray er 
Meeting in Chapel, at 6:15 p. m 



R. PORTER CAMPBELL 



Seven guards were killed by muti- 
nous convict in the Colorado State 
Penitentiary at Canon City. Four of 
these were killed by Danny Davids, 
the leader of the outbreak. He held 
them as hostages for safe conduct 
from the prison and when this was 
refused him by the warden he killed 
them in cold blood. Finding escape 
impossible he finally shot his three 
lieutenants and then committed sui- 
cide. 



-O- 



CANES FOR SENIORS 

A mark worthy of their dignity will 
soon distinguish the Seniors from the 
rest of the undergraduate body when 
hey begin to carry canes in an effort to 
establish a lasting tradition at Le- 
high. 

Heretofore the only time that canes 
were seen on the campus was after 
he outgoing Seniors had given them 
to he new Seniors on moving-up .lay 
but ow the Seniors will wear them 
throughout their last year. 

The canes are well made, and have 
been designed for the purpose of wear 
after graduation as well as during the 
Senior year. They are of assorted 
sizes, so that each Senior can be 
fitted. — The Brown and White (Le- 
high). 



K. Porter Campbell, of our Conserv- 
atory Faculty, is another product of 
Lebanon Valley College, having ac- 
quired his eary musical training here, 
as well as his practical teaching ex- 
perience. He completed courses first 
in piano, then organ, and the follow- 
ing year return as an assistant teach- 
er and completed advance work lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Music degree. 

He then set out to broaden his gen- 
eral knowledge and ability by the 
study of piano and pedagogy with 
some of the prominent New York 
teachers, but later decided to direct 
his efforts to mastering the intricacies 
of the modern organ which at that 
time was beginning to assume more 
pronounced importance as a concert 
instrument due to decided improve- 
ments from the standpoint of size, 
tonal qualities and mechanical per- 
formance. 

He chose Pietro A. Yon, inter- 
nationally recognized Italian organ- 
j ist, teacher and composer, as his 
teacher; after having completed sev- 
eral artist courses under him in New 
' York. Professor Campbell spent four 
months in study and travel with 
t Maestro Yon in his native Italy. While 
'.abroad he played during a Vesper 
! Service at St. Peter's in Rome, had 
! private hearings at the Academy of 
St. Cecilia and the Pontifical School 
( of Sacred Music, also in Rome, and 
appeared in public recitals in Milan 
I and several other important Italian 
cities. 

He the returned to Lebanon Val- 
ley as Head of the Organ Depart- 
ment. In the past few years this de- 
partment has grown considerable; a 
second organ has been added to the 
equipment of the Conservatory and at 
the present time a third would be a 
held. 

Because of his teachings schedule 
and his duties as organist of St. 
Luke's Episcopal Church in Lebanon, 
we do not often hear Professor Camp- 
bell in rectal on the immediate cam- 
pus but he frequently plays dedica- 
tory recitals, etc. in various churches 
in this section of the state 



join the one specializing in literary 
lines and not the one specializing in 
reading? It all seems very foolish. 

Certainly they do some good or 
they could not exist at all, but if 
they are to be literary societies let 
them take their place as such and 
not masquerade as something else 
under that name. Some students 
earnestly want a literary training. If 
these organizations were reorganized 
for that purpose chiefly, with an en- 
rolment of only those who are inter- 
ested, then these students could get 
what they want and those who are not 
anxiously seeking it would be left in 
peace. As one important result we 
think that much of the ill feeling 
which now exists on the campus 
would disappear, and we would have 
literary societies that would be truly 
worthy of that name. 



-0 



MORRIS SLOWLY IMPROVING 
AFTER STATE MISHAP 



After making such a good show- 
ing against Penn State a few weeks 
ago, everything was not so ioyful 
in Hook's camp when it developed 
Ithat John Munis, star lineman, will 
be lost for the rest of season. 

During the Penn State game, this 
stalwart guard, sustained an injured 
knee, tearing the ligaments. He has 
not been able to play in any of the 
games since that time, and it looks 
very much a 5 if he will be unable to 
play in any of the remaining games 
His condition is improving slowly 
The cast was removed on Monday 
but it will still be necessary for him 
to use crutches for some time. 



PRINTING 

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38 So. Lancaster St., 
Annville, Pa. 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
A Mesage of Love to the Folks 
at Home 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



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hardware 
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KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, F* 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER, 24, 1929 



PAGE THREL 




*A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

—JONATHAN SWIF1 



Voice from Dormitory: Hey, "Oley," where are you going? 
"Oley" (crossing campus}: Leap-frog Laboratary under Sitlinger. 

—LVC— 

Tip for Miss Fencil: We hear Sitlinger is going to try out for the Coed 
Basketball team. The fellows' team doesn't offer enough competition. 

— LVC— 

Dr. Shenk: "Mr. Cunjack, what is there of historical interest about your 
community?" 

Cunjack: "Well, I don't know anything of historical interest about 
Steelton except the Susquehanna River runs thru it?" 
Dr. Shenk: "Very good, Mr. Cunjack." 

—LVC— 

Ruth March (as Head of table): "What is this dish of corn for?" 
Coleman, waiter: "Oh, these are the seconds on asparagus." 

—LVC— ~~~ 

Senior: How old is this corn? 
Junior: It's Indian corn. 

— LVC— 

Prof. Stevenson: Now since we've heard a lot about Ethelbert of Trent, 
what can you tell us about his wife, Mr. Heller? 
Pause — laugh — roar! ! 

—LVC— , 

Arline Heckrote (conversing from second floor of North hall with Sny- 
der): "Wait till I see you." 

John Snyder: "Hey, you're not allowed to talk to MEN!" 
Arline: "I'm not! ! !" 

— LVC— 

A campus sage observes that when two young people get their head to- 
gether they are dancing. ("Someties," says J. Dawgone with a wise squint 
°f the eye. "I've seen them along the Quittie and in the graveyard, I've seen 
Mem on "Dorm" porches and in the parlors — the shadows blending two heads 
°ne— and they WERE NOT dancing.") 

— LVC— 

Men brag about coming from a good family as if they had something to 
d< > with it. 

— LVC— 

And then there was McCusker who hopped a mile for a Camel. 

— LVC— 

A man who is always polite to his wife before company, doesn't always 
^member the saying that two is company. (Just a bit of premature advice 
the Association of campus couples.) 

— LVC— 

???????????? 
(See "Micky" Toronto for this one.) 

— LVC— 

Fae Bachman to "Charlie" Mummert, returning from Pennway: Aren't 
y ° u going to class, "Charlie"? 

"Charlie" (flustered): I can't. I haven't any book. 1 must go to the 
dor m" and get some. 

— LVC— 

D r. Gossard's definition of Freshmen: They are just like the rest of 
y °u were." 

— LVC— 

Dr . Butterwick: What is man's place in the universe? 
Grant Parsons: We-e-e-i, we are a little less than the angels. 



Iiiiiiiiiiimmfltmnimtitimimniinnniiiiii^miriiijiriii'v: 

Alumni Notes 

:>iiiiiiiitiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiimmttitmttiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiif 

Mrs. Frances Hammond of the 
class of '29, has been made first as- 
sistant of one of the branches of the 
Enoch-Pratt Library of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Starr were the guests 
of honor on Saturday afternoon at a 
party given by Miss Violet P. Wal- 
ter, of Annville. Mr. and Mrs. Starr, 
so far as La Vie has learned, are the 
most recently married couple among 
the Alumni. Mrs. Starr is the former 
Miss Marion Hess, May Queen of '26. 

O 

INDIAN TALK 

PLEASES DELPHI HIKERS 



Delphian Literary Society held their 
eight annual hike for the Freshmen 
girls, Monday evening, Oct. 21st, with 
ithe destination "somewhere" on the 
banks of the Quittie. 

Seated before a large bonfire was 
Chief Hawkeye and his squaw, No- 
komis. Near them sat the medicine 
man. Within their lodge sat their 
daughter, the beautiful Minnehaha, for 
whose hand three brave young war- 
riors, War Eagle, Pale Face, and 
Fleet Foot, were competing. 

In order that his daughter might 
have the truest, strongest, and brav- 
test of the warriors, Chief Hawkeye 
s ends them out to climb a certain high 
mountain and return with a token. 
Before their departure Minnehaha 
comes out of he lodge and sings "The 
Indian Love Call." 

When War Eagle returns he pre- 
sents a leaf to Chief Hawkeye who 
tells the young warrior that no trees 
grew on the mountain and therefore 
he could not have gone in search 
of it. 

In the distance Pale Face is seen 
This young warrior present a twig as 
his token. He is likewise told of his 
dishonesty. 

Shortly afterwards Fleet Foot came 
stumbling into Chief Hawkeye's pres- 
ence. The young warrior falls at the 
chief's feet, weary and exhausted. His 
token, a piece of rock, rolls from his 
hand. 

Chief Hawkeye declared his to be 
(the true token. He presented Minne- 
haha to Fleet Foot to become his 
squaw. 

Those who took part were: Chief 
Hawkeye, Ruth March; Nokonvs, 
Josophine Schell; Minnehaha, Hester 
Thompson', War Eagle, Elizabeth 
Hoy; Pale Eagle, Grace Keener; Fleet 
Foot, Blanche Cochran; Medicine 
Man, Ruth Shroycr; Hunters, Dorothy 
Hiester and Eleanor Kissinger; War- 
riors, Blanche Cochran, Mary Ax, 
Elizabeth Lefever, Henrietta Wagner, 
Helen Peterson, Elizabeth Ulrich. 
and Hilda D. Buckley. 

O 

GENERAL DROP IN 

COLLEGE ATTENDANCE 



An "almost startling" slowing-up in 
the rate of increase of college regis- 
trations last year, was noted by Dr. 
Adam T.eroy Jones, Director of Ad- 
missions of Columbia University, in 
his annual report to President Nich- 
olas Murray Butler, which was made 
public reccntiy. 

On the basis of a study of the 216 
colleges in the approved list of the As- 
sociation of American Universities (of 
which Otterbein is a member), which 
does not include junior colleges, Dr. 
Jones found that the rush to enter col- 
lege which followed he World War is 
over. He added that neither the im- 
mediate nor distant future holds a 
■prospect of any great increase in reg- 
istrations. 

Admissions to the colleges studied 
showed an increase last year of only 
2 per cent over the year previous and, 
'although detailed figures for 1929-.10 
were not available, Dr. Jones found 
no indication of material gain. 

(Continued on Pago 4) 



= lillllllllll!llllllll!lllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllim 

Jin and About the Literary Societies! 

TmiiiiimiiumuiiiiMiiHiiiiiHMumiiii^ 



CLIO STAGES REVUE 

OF 1929 AT SESSION 



The Clio Review of 1929 was fea- 
tured in Clio's regular meeting on 
Friday evening, October 18. It was 
an open meeting to which the West 
Hall and Day Student Freshmen were 
invited. 

"The Breakaway" chorus, composed 
of Mary McCurdy, Mary Stager, Mil- 
dred Saylor, Mary Rupp and Joseph- 
ine Yake, opened the review with a 
song and dance number. 

Clio Twenty Years Ago was 
shown by Marie Erghot, Ethel Hower, 
and Edna Early, while "Charlie" 
Mummert, Dorothy Highland, and 
Betty Black gave an interpretation of 
present Clio. 

Alccsta Slichter took the girls "No- 
where in a Ford" and Ann Gordon and 
Gladys Knaub gave a very clever 
"Numerical Romance." 

An old-fashioned costume with 
Madaline Rife as the singer seeking 
for fame depicted the music of the 
Past. Mildred Meyers represented 
Present Music by playing the master- 
piece of a modern composer. 

In Music the Future a huge scale 
was brought forth will the "Break- 
away" girls as the notes representing 
the television of the future. 

A finale dance chorus brought the 
Review to an end. 

O 

PROFESSIONS FORMS 

THEME OF PHILO MEN 



The regular meeting of Philo was 
held in Philo Hall last Friday night 
a program based on vocation was 
presented. 

Hertzler opened the meeting with 
the devotions. The first subject was 
"The Lure of Science" by Stam- 
baugh. He discussed science in gen- 
eral and then more specifically as his 
chosen field ot chemistry. 

The mathematician, William Mey- 
ers, discussed "The Lure of Mathe- 
matics." Hi.-; talk on the ''queen of 
the sciences" was well presented. 

In a talk entitled "Salesmanship" 
Calvin Keene recounted his methods 
and those of others salesmen in the 
Wearever Aluminum line. His re- 
marks were the start of many "slams" 
during the period of general remarks. 

As a final number Sitlinger gave a 
very humorous reading entitled "The 
Specialist". His number kept his 
audience in an uproar from start to 
finish. 



MOCK MURDERER IS 

TRIED BY KALO COURT 



At last the murderer of Adolph 
Hyde has been convicted! After a 
strenuous debate conducted by 
"Moose" Morgan, the defending at- 
torney, and "Ike" Grant, the prose- 
cuting attorney, the ruthless slayer 
was doomed. Cyrus Shenk, the mis- 
creant, tried to save his skin by plead- 
ing "not guilty" but he was only par- 
tially successful. The jury rendered 
a verdict of guilty of manslaughter 
and recommended a penalty, which in 
time will surely give him halitosis of 
he homologous hematochrome. What 
is Death's sting in comparison with 
this. 

Miss Sarah Flappergust, the State's 
star witness, testified that she knew 
Mr. Shenk and Adolph Hyde very in- 
timately. Miss Flappergust's attitude 
created a sensation in the crowded 
court room. Judge Rhoads warned 
her not to overstep the bounds of 
propriety. Her testimony was very 
damaging to Mr. Shenk's defense. 

Mr. Grant closed the prosecution 
by exploding the perfect alibi theory 
of Mr. Morgan. However, Mr. Mor- 
gan, fighting to the end, made an im- 
passioned plea for the defendant. His 
oration was so forceful that tears could 
be seen on the faces of the married 
men in the jury. The jury retired and 
after lengthy debate returned and an- 
nounced the verdict. 

O— 

ARTS PORTRAYED AT 

DELPHIAN MEETING 



Delphian Literary Society held their 
weekly meetir.g, Friday evening, in 
Delphian Hall. Devotions were con- 
ducted by Ruth Liller. 

The program touched on the sub- 
jects of literature, poetry, and music, 
aptly illustrated by the following: 

Glimpses of Literature. Mary Ax; 
A Bit of the Poets, Grace Keener; 
Pianologue: "It Takes a Heap o' 
Livin' ", by Edgar Guest; "The Was 
a Phantom of Delight," by William 
Wadsworth — given by Benita Stre- 
big; and accompanied by Dorothy 
Boyer; Resume of the History of Mu- 
sic, Dorothy Thompson; Piano solo, 
Margaret Y'cung; Vocal solo, Dor- 
othy Hafer. 

"Our Gang Comedy" provided a bit 
of merriment. Jokes were told by 
Phyllis Trone, a monologue given by 
Ruth Shroyer, a piano solo by Mary 
K. Goshert, and a vocal solo, by Hes- 
ter Thompson. 



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HARPEL'S 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE C OLLEG1ENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER, 24, 1929 



FROSH t Q.'S SECURED 

FROM JPENIHG TESTS 
(Continued from Page 1) 



it will then indicate that the Fresh- 
man intelligence is not up to the 
standard of former years. 

Another significant fact brought out 
by a comparison of the scores of men 
and women is that the women did 
much better than the men, the median 
score for the women being 41.5 per 
cent higher than the median score for 
the men. 

The medians for rive years are as 
follows: 

Class of Men Women All 

1929 151. 5 172.5 162.0 

1930 164.0 154.5 176.5 

193 1 172-7 190.0 179.0 

1932 162.0 189.0 173-0 

1933 II2 -S I54-0 130-0 
The highest score made was 247, 

the maximum possible score being 
395. The distribution of the scores 
made is given below. 



Scores 


Men 


Women 


All 


240—249 





1 


1 


230—239 











220 — 229 





1 


1 


210 — 219 


1 


4 


5 


200 — 209 


a 


1 • "' 


i 


190 — 199 


2 


3 


5 


180—189 


1 





1 


170 — 179 





3 


3 


160 — 169 


1 


1 


2 


150—159 


4 


5 


9 


140 — 149 


5 


2 


7 


130—139 


8 


2 


10 


120 — 129 


3 


3 


6 


no — ng 


z< 


7 


7 


100 — iog 


7 


2 


9 


90— 99 


4. 


I 


5 


80— 89 


8 


2 


10 


70— 79 


1 







60 — 69 


5 







50— 59 


1 







40— 49 


1 







30— 39 





i 




20 — 29 


1 







Total 


57 


35 


92 



-O- 



CONFERENCE DRAWS 

NATIONAL INTEREST 
(Continued from Page 1) 



FRIDAY, OCT. 25 
9:00 a. m. Chapel service — Student 
Choir, directed by Mrs. Ruth Engle 
Bender; Address, "Bill" Kroll. 
AFTERNOON 
1:00 — 5:00 p. m. Personal "Chats'" 
with our Leaders: "Pit" Van Dusen, 
"Jack" Hart, "Bill" Kroll, Paul Lim- 
bert; 5:,-:o p. m. Dinner, with Spice. 
EVENING 
7:"o p. m Address, "Pit" Van 
Dusen; Student Choir; 8:30 p. m. Col- 
loquia. 

SATURDAY. OCT. 26 
8:30 — 10:00 a. m. Colloquia; inter- 
mission: 10: r 5 — 11:45 a. m. Colloquia; 
12:15 p. m. Lunch. 

AFTERNOON 
1:30 — 2:45 p. m. Colloquia; 3:00 
p. m. 

"Many love music, but for music's 
sake, 

Many because her touches can 
awake 

Thoughts that renose within the 

breast halt dead 
And rise to follow where she loves 
to lead." — Landor, 

Directed by Edgar Shroyer; 3:15 p. 
m., Address. Paul Limbert; Open 
Forum; 5:30 p. m. Dinner. 

EVENING 
8:00 p. in. "Socialization"; "And 
laughter holding both his sides" — 
Milton. 

SUNDAY, OCT. 26 
9:00 a. ni. Worship Service; Stu- 
dent Choir; Communion, "This do in 
remembrance of me"; 10:00 a. m. 
"Echoes" from Colloquia; 12:15 p. m. 
Dinner. 

AFTERNOON 

2:00 p. m. Music, Selected; Address, 
"The Personality of Jesus in Our 
Pagan Society." "Pit" Van Dusen; 
"Follow the Gleam". 

All general addresses and open 
forums will be held in Engle Hall. 



Discussion 

The discussion groups will be divid- 
ed into four sections to discuss: 1. 
"Finding My Place in Life" (Voca- 
tional Guidance), Leader, "Jack" 
Hart, Place, North Hall. 2. "Build- 
ing a Home" (Relations between men 
and women), Leader, "Bill" Kroll, 
Place, Philo Hall. 3. "Student- 
Faculty Relations", Leader, Paul 
Limbert, Piace, Kalo Hall. 4. "Form- 
ing a Philosophy of Life", Leader, 
•'Pit" Van Dusen, Place, Delphian 
Hall. 

STAR COURSE WILL 

PRESENT FINE TALENT 

(Continued from Page 1) 



more than pleased. Everyone has 
commented upon the wonderful pre- 
sentation." 

In addition to the singing, playing 
and reading which were a program 
alone, the staging and light effects 
were marvelous for a traveling com- 
pany. It certainly brings to the audi- 
ence an effect that is impossible over 
the radio. 

O 

GENERAL DROP IN 

COLLEGE ATTENDANCE 

Continued from Page 3) 



Saying that "there are good reasons 
for believing that the drop in regis- 
trations may be more than tempor- 
ary," Dr. Jones cited the restriction of 
immigration and the small rate of in- 
crease of native population among 
possible causes for he slump. 



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ALL FOR $1.00 

1200 pages — all the illustrations that 
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Well's Outline of History 
Now — $1.00 
Buy at 

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Book & Stationery Store 

33 South Eighth Street, 



RECOGNITION SERVICES 

HELD FOR NEW GIRLS 

(Continued from Page 



presented with a Y. W. C. A. pin and 
also given a blue triangle, the symbol 
cf the Y. W C. A., with a small 
lighted candles placed on it. 

After each new girl had been recog- 
nized as a sister of the Y. W. C. A., 
the choir sang "Follow the Gleam." 
Everyone fell in line and marched to 
a large triangle made by white crepe 
paper on the campus where everyone 
,oined in prayer. The service was 
disbanded by everyone singing 
"Blessed Jesus." 

O : 

3LIO GIRLS VISIT 

EXCHANTED FOREST 
(Continued from Page 



who immediately died. In the day- 
light the children find the path home. 

The cast included: Hansel, Irene 
Peter; Gretel, Leah Miller; Witch, 
Madeline Riie; Sandman, Anne Gor- 
don; Dawn Fairy, Mildred Saylor; 
Dorothy Garber, Anne Kiehl, Eliza- 
beth Flook, and Mary Stager. 

Clio Hall was transformed into a 
forest for the occasion, as the weather 
conditions prevented the program be- 
ing the big feature of the hike. 



GRIMM'S 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



SPECIALS 
College Seal Paper, 50c per Box 
Bridge Lamps, complete, $1.25 
Adjustable Reading Lamps, complete, 
Regular Price $3.25 
NOW— $2.25 




40 N. STH ST., LEBANON 
Optometrist— No Drops Used 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 




HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF 



Our recent defeat by Muhlenberg 
may be made somewhat lighter when 
we learn that sixteen years ago they 
defeated us r.lso, by the margin of one 
point or the score of 1 1-9. 

In that game L. V.'s team, as usual, 
fought a hard gallic and the opposing 
team did likewise. The teams were 
very well matched; so well indeed, we 
are told, that the majority of points 
scored could have fallen on one side 
as well as the other. 

The two men who starred for Leb- 
anon Valley were Mackert and Rupp. 

— From '^College News." 



j~L/V\ TEN YEARS AGO 

STAR COURSE OF THE PAST 



The first number of the Star Course 
that year was given Jan. 11, ign -j^ 
group scheduled was "The Paramount 
Entertainers." The program was one 
well balanced with music and reading 
quite similar to many of our g^ar 
Course programs today. 

A decided departure from present 
day star course presentations here c 
curred in the second presentation 0n 
January 16, 1919. At this time a 
scientific lecture by Professor Hilton 
Ira Jones was given. 

— From "College News." 



KREAMER BROS. 

STEIN1TE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WAS HE R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 

RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 

"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 

328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 Annville, P a . 





c 



WANTED 
a 




ompanson 



^"GENTLEMEN, tomorrow 
u I we will discuss the refining 
influence of Freud on the in- 
habitants of Patagonia" . . . 
"And I told her no, we 
couldn't go to the Ritz for dinner, 
what did she think I am anyway" 
. . . "Boy, This Man's College 
sure has a football team!" . . . 
"Mr. Seegansinger, please tell the 
class your opinion of the Theory of 
Relativity as applied to" . . . 

In comparison with Campus 
Chatter or even the most interesting 
lectures, give us a chat with the 
folks at Home every time ... for real 
entertainment and simon-pure Joy 
that stays with you! 

Oh sure, maybe our opinion is 
biased. But if it «, so is the opinion 
of s-e-v-e-r-a-1 College Men ^ t 
on that subject! 

Just for fun . . . Teleph one 
Home tonight! 





J 



MT. ST. MARY'S 
Vs. L. V. AT LEBANON 
NOVEMBER 2 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SUCCESS TO ALL! 
MID-SEMESTER EXAMS 
NOVEMBER 4-9 



rOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER, 31, 1929 



NUMBER 6 



ORGETOWN SWAMPS 
L V, IN 27-0 VICTORY 



MYLIN WARRIORS HOLD FOE 
TO DEFENSIVE IN 
SECOND HALF 



Georgetown's grid machine defeat- 
ed Lebanon Valley at the American 
League ball park, Washington, D. C, 
on Saturday by a score that does not 
do justice to the local eleven. George- 
town succeeded in tallying four 
touchdowns, one in the first quarter, 
two in the second and one in the 
fourth. They were successful in all 
but one try for point after touch- 
down, thus scoring 27 points, but the 
Blue and White made the game a 
great deal more interesting than it 
appears, by coming within scoring 
distance three times. 

Sipe, who got his first real chance 
this year when he substituted for 
Daub, showed wonderful ball toting 
prowess when he eluded Georgetown 
tacklers on two successive runs for 
a total gain of 48 yards. He had a 
clea|r [field ahead! ')of him but Was 
brought down from the rear by a 
Georgetown tackier. The ball was 
on the three yard line but Lebanon 
Valley tried three line bucks and a 
pass and were unable to take the 
pigskin across. 

In this period Albright threw sev- 
eral passes to Orsino which netted 
long gains and gave the Georgetown 
secondary defense plenty to worry 
about. Georgetown used two sets of 
backs in an endeavor to break up this 
open offensive. Every time the ball 
was intercepted near the goal line 
and Georgetown punted out of dan- 
ger. 

(Continued on Page 3) 

O • 

COMMUNION SERVICE 

IMPRESSES STUDENTS 



A service of inspiration and dig- 
nity was the Sunday morning service 
°f the Student Conference held at 
p 'ne o'clock in the chapel. The Holy 
Communion ceremony was observed 
at that time. In the memory of all 
Present students this was the first 
service of this type to be held in our 
Chapel. 

Following the processional of the 
vested choir, Dr. Gossard opened the 
Serv ice with the invocation. The 
student choir then sang an anthem. 
wit h Mrs. Mills as soloist. 

Mr. Ingalls, after a short talk, read 
numerous passages of scripture. His 
fading was slow and impressive 
v, 'hile the audience maintained the 
rtl0st Profound silence. 
^ P r - Van Dusen officiated in dis- 
puting the element of the sacra- 
^ en t He was assisted by Dr. 
Richie and Dr. Butterwick. "Mary 
ar >k, Grace Keener, Helen Peterson, 
J ° n n Snyder, and Paul Emenheiser, 
s Ushers served the communers in 
hc audience. The service was 
^loscd with a recessional hymn by 
choir and the benediction. 
'Undoubtedly this service will long 
em ain i n the minds of the students 



FIRST TUG LANDS 
SOPHS IN QUITTIE 

TWO HOUR BATTLE ON 
SECOND PULL LEAVES 
TUG UNDECIDED 



Who 



■were present as one of the most 



^fective and worthy they have ever 
* tte nded on the campus. 



For the third consecutive year the 
Soph and Frosh rope tuggers have 
met in the rain and on the muddy 
banks of the Quittie to pull for the 
annual prize of hemp. Perhaps the 
fault lies with "Jupe" Pluvius for 
dampening the ardor of the Sophs 
in the first pull of the tug of war on 
Thursday, October 24, when the 
Frosh gave them the only ducking 
of the battle. 

To a disinterested spectator, *he 
Frosh gave evidence of a stronger 
team than the. Sophs. The coin was 
tossed and the "green" were given 
the farther side of the Quittie. This 
is the most advantageous position 
and within two minutes the Sophs 
were floundering in the river. The 
sides were changed and the Sophs 
came back with a fighting determin- 
ation 'to break even. Despite the 
fact that they now had the advan- 
tage, they were unable to pull the 
Frosh from their position after a 
two-hour battle. The contest ended 
with one pull in favor of the Frosh 
and the second pull a draw. Both 
teams displayed fine fighting spirit 
which leads us to believe that the an- 
nual football game will be a 
''corker." 

O 



CONFEREES PROVIDE 
FOR SOCIAL MEETS 

DINNER AND PROGRAM GIVE 
ZEST TO LIGHTER 
MOMENTS 



The socialization hour of the "Y" 
Fall Conference, held in their chapel 
on Saturday evening, contained some 
unusual and very interesting numbers. 

The program opened with an organ 
solo by Mildred Meyers. The next 
number, a Numerical Romance, which 
sounded like a speed test in count- 
ing, was cleverly done by Anne Gor- 
don and Gladys Knaub. 

Music of the Past took us into a 
room filled with young ladies and 
gentlemen, who were listening to an 
old-fashioned girl, Madeline Rife, sing- 
ing those two popular songs, "Just a 
Song at Twilight" and "Seein' Nellie 
Home." 

Mr. T. Robt. Eshelman's remark- 
able ability as a pianist was heard 
when he played "Romance" by Si- 
belins, and "Prelude in G-Minor," by 
Rachmaninoff. 

Leah Miller sang "The Little Dam- 
osel," "The Rosary," and "The Lilac 
Tree." 

Dorothy Garber explained that the 
Music of the Future would come to 
us by television and illustrated from 
a huge scale on the stage. As she 
cut out each note of the octave a head 
appeared. The chorus sang "Am T 
Blue." 

(Continued on Page 3) 



COLLEGES REPRESENTED 

AT LOCAL CONFERENCE 



This college found itself in the 
limelight to such an extent during 
the Student Conference that other 
colleges sent delegates here to ob- 
serve how cur students carried on 
their activities and what measure of 
success was accomplished. 

Bucknell University was repre- 
sented by Mr. Abernathy. Miss Adel- 
la Krupp was an Albright College 
visitor. Dickinson College sent Mr. 
Hohnan as delegate. Miss Ruth 
Heisey, Miss Amanda Gish and Mrs. 
Wenger represented Elizabethtown 
College, and these visitors have al- 
ready expressed to our local "Y" the 
benefits they received from the Con- 
ference and their congratulations up- 
on our success in this new project. 

O • 



YOUTH EXPERTS LEAD 
STUDENT C0LL0QUIA 

GROUPS BENEFIT FROM 
FRANK DISCUSSIONS HELD 
ON VITAL PROBLEMS 



The colloquia held during the Stu- 
dents Conference on the four topics 
voted by '.lie students last spring as 
th most desirable for discussion 
aroused intense interest on the cam- 
pus. Each of the four groups were 
enthusiastically supported by large 
groups of students. The subjects 
discussed included faculty-student re- 
lations, vocational guidance, men and 
women's relations and a guiding life 
philosophy. 

Faculty — Student Group 

The discussion group on "Faculty- 
Student Relations" had as a very able 
leader Dr. Paul Limbert of Franklin 
and Marshall College. This group 
was composed of both students and 
faculty and both groups decided at 
the beginning of the discussion to be 
frank in all questions. 

The major result of the four ses- 
sions of intimate contact between 
faculty and students was the positive 
r evival of the Faculty-Student Council 
which existed here during the school 
year 1927-8. To this Council will be 
brought all the problems arising 
(Continued on Page 3) 

O 

BRIDGE LUNCHEON IS 

GIVEN BY MRS. BENDER 



A very delightful bridge luncheon 
was held at the home of Mrs. Ruth 
Engle-Bender Saturday afternoon, 
October 26. About forty guests were 
present, including many members of 
the College faculty. Miss Leila Flory, 
of the Conservatory faculty, was 
guest of honor. 



NO LA VIE NEXT WEEK! 



As mid-semester examinations are 
scheduled foi the week of November 
I to 9. there will be no issue of LA 
VIE until November 14. 



FALL CONFERENCE IS 

CAMPUS ACHIEVEMENT 



LEADERS SENT BY NATIONAL "Y" COUNCIL HELP YOUTH TO 
DECISIONS OF VITAL PROBLEMS THRU OPEN 
DISCUSSIONS AND LECTURES 



"Finding One's Self" proved a fit- 
ting title for the Conference "of the 
students, by th;e students, for the 
students" which was held at Leba- 
non Valley College during the week 
end of Oct. 25, 26, 27. Henry P. Van 
Dusen, William Kroll, John Hart, 
Paul Limbert, and Harold Ingalls 
brought to 'he campus the inspira- 
tion which characterized the various 
meetings of the week-end. A student 
choir directed by Mrs. Bender, or- 
gan music by Prof. Fields and vocal 
selections by Mrs. Mills added that 
beautiful and sacred touch which 
only music can give. 

Public addresses, open forum, dis- 
cussion groups, interviews with lead- 
ers, socializing, musical programs, 
worship service, and communion sum 
up briefly the varied program of 
three days. 

It was the aim of his Conference 
to permit students to meet master 
minds which have faced problems of 
life and struggled with them for un- 
derstanding, in the hope that the 
tudents would find in the experiences 
of these great leaders a means of 
knowing their true selves. 

Under the influence of these lives 
and the dynamic force which they 
radiated we have found ourselves 
O 

ARTISTS PLEASE IN 
STAR COURSE CONCERT 

VAUDEVILLE AND OPERA 
SCENES GIVE VARIETY 
TO PRESENTATION 



A program of unusual character 
and variety was given in Engle Hall 
Monday evening, October 28, by the 
John Ross Reed Company as the 
first of the series of Star Course 
nuinbers planned for this season. The 
company was composed of Mr. Reed, 
baritone, Dagny Jensen Reed, so- 
prano and reader, Kathleen Powell, 
mezzo-soprano, Rachel Stone, vio- 
linist and pianist, and Wilbur Max- 
well, presentor. 

The program was rather unique in 
that it contained all classes of music 
arid entertainment, from grand opera 
and the "sublime," to vaudeville and 
the ridiculous. Their interpretations 
of scenes from "Carmen," "Madame 
Butterfly," "The Garden of Allah." 
and a Norwegian folk scene were es- 
pecially characteristic, with elaborate 
scenery and costuming. Mr. Reed, as 
,i soloist, made quite a '"hit," while 
his ability as humorist and entertain- 
er was evident throughout the even- 
irg. A final touch of the beautiful 
was given, in a cathedral scene, in 
which Schubert's "Ave Maria" was 
the outstanding theme. 



unified "In Quest of Life's Meaning." 

The Conference opened officially 
on Friday morning during our regu- 
lar chapel period. "Bill" Kroll by 
.•ay of introduction to the discussion 
group on "Relations between Men 
and Women" gave a talk on some of 
the general facts pertaining to that 
subject. He emphasized the breadth, 
the difficulty, and, above all, the great 
need of such a topic. This leader 
showed unusual ability in his hand- 
ling of a delicate situation. 

Dr. Van Dusen 

Dr. Van Dusen in his address on 
''College and a Philosophy of Life," 
on Friday evening not only intro- 
duced himself and the evidence of 
his wide experience but also the sub- 
ject with which he was to deal sc 
ably in the next few days. 

He pictured for us a student in his 
Freshman days contrasted with the 
same one four years later. Then 
came the negative answer to the 
challenging question, "Are we, then, 
masters of our fates and captains of 
our souls?", for he proved that en- 
vironment l?rgely shapes our phi- 
losophies. He summoned up the 
three outstanding characteristics of 
American college students in the 
lollowing: 

1. The worship of the new because 
it is new, namely, the youthful spirit 
manifested everywhere. 

2. A wholesome impatience to 
convention. 

3- A tremendous passion for free- 
dom. 

He noted that students show lit- 
tle evidence of real freedom, a fact 
which has been proved in the fre- 

(Continued on Page 3) 



ROOM FOR MEN IS 

REFITTED BY Y. If. 



Last week under the direction and 
juricdiction of the Y. M. C. A. an 
old rendezvous was made new for 
the male_ students of Lebanon Val- 
ley on the first floor of the men's dor- 
mitory. This room has now become 
a fitting place where fellows can 
spend a few moments or an hour in 
quiet, reading the paper or taking an 
enjoyable smoke. The "Y" gave the 
old room a coat of paint, equipped 
it with a new living room suite, a 
new rug, curtains, a floor lamp, and 
table lamp, smokodore, table, and 
magazine rack. 

The renovating committee in 
change was, C. Keene, R. Rauda- 
bush and Rhoads. Several of the girls 
in North Hall made the curtains. 
Close to $200 was invested in the re- 
pairs and it is hoped the students 
will take good care of the room as 
it now is. 



PAGE TWO 



ICaUk (Eallegiemte 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAPP 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 .. Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene. '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk. '30 . Managing Editor 

EEPOKTOEIAL STAPP 

Grace Keener, '30 

warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

iius»eil Morgan, '31 

Kbt. L. Kaudabush. '31 • 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A Edgar Shroyer. - '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAPP 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

"William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
Of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



%4 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscri ption $1.50 per ye ar 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



"ECHOES" 



no . 
»mta 

■ 4st§ 



'.nil 



With the Student Conference 
opening a new epoch in Lebanon Val- 
ley history and with it as a new 
landmark in student achievement, let 
us look back over the three days of 
the conference and see what it has 
3 done for us, both directly and indi- 
rectly. 

In this day when our own church 
is discussing union with other de- 
nominations similar to ours, does it 
not seem as if this group who have 
been responsible for the Conference 
have not unconsciously done some- 
thing for the students of today— who 
will be the leaders of tomorrow — 
that may bring that union of denom- 
inations to a speedier reality. We 
have been in touch with men of other 
denominations. We all met on com- 
mon ground and denominationalism 
was entirely negligible. The church- 
es we attend at home invite frequent- 
ly laymen and ministers of other 
denominations to speak from their 
pulpits. However, for many students 
this was the first opportunity to get 
into intimate contact — growing in 
many cases into intimate comrade- 
ship — with men of other fields ' than 
ours. , 
. Just as cur own faculty members 
are called into other denominations 
and other localities to furnish a tem- 
porary change in personnel and pro- 
vide a source of inspiration to those 
groups or communities, thus the 
leaders of our Student Conference 
served an identical purpose here. A 
change provides in a twinkling what 
years of persuasion cannot do. That 
is merely a bit of practical psychol- 
ogy. 

Through the discussion groups 
many "wrinkles have been ironed 
out" that without this Conference 
would have continued as problems of 
the students. Perhaps one of the 
greatest benefits accruing to the 
students en masse will come from 
the Student Faculty colloquium. Is 
there a campus anywhere in the 
United States that is not confronted 
with difficulties and misunderstand- 
ings arising between students and 
faculty. The discussion in this group 
was especiaMy helpful in bringing 
students and faculty to a mutual un- 
derstanding of some conditions and a 
frank interchange of ideas. 

Every discussion group was the 
source of constructive thinking. Our 
students — a fair cross section of the 
frank, critical, assertive youth of to- 
day — have secured new ''food for 



though," they have revised their opin- 
ions, they have had a glimpse of what 
awaits them beyond school and how 
to make the most of their post-cam 
pu3 life. 

Not only have we immediate bene 
fits to reckon, but future classes will 
also receive a heritage. It will show 
them what a group of youth can do 
when constiuctive use is made oi 
their talents, for this Conference was 
entirely a student proposition. fu- 
ture inspiration for leadership will be 
spurred on by the outstanding c : 
pie of executive abihty shown by . 
group of students responsible for tHis 
Conference. Pioneers, such as th 
' \ " group who have put on a succ 
ful conference of a type never beto.e 
launched on any cam, us, are un- 
doubtedly an asset to a school and 
should become in later years alumni 
of prestige. 

Dewey tells us that schools should 
represent a miniature world. This con- 
ference with its student leaders and 
its student followers, facing problems 
and attempting to solve them, with 
the guidance of experts always in the 
background, must have reminded our 
onlookers of Dewey's world in minia- 
ture. 

O 

BLAZING THE TRAIL 

"To be or not to be; that is the 
question." 

And the question was the Lebanon 
Valley Conference, during the spring 
of 1929. It was during the month of 
March that two of our boys visited a 
Student Conference at Buckhill Falls, 
and remarked, in the presence of a 
National Y. M. C. A. Secretary, "That 
was great! If only we could have 
something of the kind on our own 
campus." And "Why not?" was the 
question that started it all. 

"Pete" Ingalls "happened" to pay 
Lebanon Valley a visit soon after, 
with the result that a questionnaire 
was submitted to the students one 
morning in chapel to determine 
whether they would be willing to sup- 
port such an enterprise, and if so, 
what questions they would prefer to 
discuss;. The four topics receiving 
the highest number of votes from the 
entire student body were the four 
upon which the program of the past 
week-end were based. The original 
plan was to arrange the conference for 
April, but due to limited time and the 
impossibility of securing the best 
speakers upon such short notice, it 
was deferred until this fall. 

Definite work began during the 
early weeks of the summer and by 
the first of July dates were secured 
and endorsed. Plans were perfected 
gradually with advice and help of 
"Pete" Ingalls of the National Coun- 
cil and of the faculty. 

The Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Cabi- 
nets spent almost an entire day im- 
mediately preceding Freshman Week- 
arranging and discussing the tenta- 
ive program. The following two 
weeks Were occupied largely in a 
search for suggestiones mainly among 
those older and more, experienced, 
for there were no guide posts — WE 
WERE BLAZING A TRAIL. Com- 
mittees were then appointed from the 
entire student body and work began 
in dead earnest. Everyone on the cam- 
pus "knows the rest." 

O 



Among Oar Seniors 





RUTH GRACE COOPER 



Courage, Vison, Energy! Such arc 
the characteristics of this leader oi 
the pioneers who convoked last week 
the first Student Conference that 
Lebanon Valley has ever seen. 

The executive ability that Ruth 
possesses contributed extensively to 
the success of this idea. Her vision 
saw the benefits our school might 
reap; her courage helped her through 
obstacles that are always encounter- 
ed in launching a new project. 

The students, perhaps, do not real- 
ize to what extent this campus is in- 
depted to Ruth. At no other school 
has such a Conference ever convened 
for the sole benefit of local students. 
The Conference was an experiment. 
Ruth, in her executive capacity as 
president of the Y. W. C. A., has 
demonstrate] that such a conference 
can be made by success and a bene- 
fit to any >ocal student body. 

In spite of Ruth's numerous activ- 
ities, she finds time to write very com- 
mendable poetry. It is probably this 
poet's vision of the ideal that enabled 
Ruth to see her Alma Mater bene- 
fits by something as unique and dif- 
ferent on our campus as this Student 
Conference. 

A worthy student, a practical vi- 
sionary, a doer — that is Ruth. 



AUXILIARY HOLD FOOD 

SALE IN SOUTH HALL 



Saturday morning, October 26th, 
the Ladies Auxiliary conducted a 
food sale on South Hall porch. 
There was a tempting array of cakes, 
pies, and candies such as mother 
bakes. During the fifteen minutes in- 
termission of the conference discus- 
sion group in Delphian Hall 
the number of sales were fast and 
numerous, which aided greatly toward 
its success. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



LATEST IN CARS 

At last the front-wheel drive car 
is a fact. The Auburn Company has 
placed on the car market the CORD 
in which the engine is connected di- 
rectly with the front wheels instead 
of the rear as formerly. The new 
car goes back to the old principle of 
putting the horse behind the cart. It 
is pulled by its engine instead of be- 
ing pushed. Its manufacturers claim 
that there is not the loss of power 
which is found in a car where the 
engine is at one end and the point of 
application at the other. They also 
claim that steering is easier and the 
likelihood of skidding is reduced, be- 
sides various other advantages. There 
are no gear shift pedals. The shift 
itself is a shaft coming thru the in- 
strument board. The steering column 
is adjustable. The car itself is 
wider, longer and very loW. The 
sedan holds six passengers comfort- 
ably. 



NATIONAL GOODWILL 

President Hoover and Premier 
MacDonald have issued a joint 
statement after their conference say- 
ing that their conversation has been 
largely confied to mutual relations in 
the two countries in the light of the 
Kellogg Pact and that "therefore in a 
new and reinforced sense the two 
governments not only declare that 
war is unthinkable but that distrust 
and suspicions arising from doubts 
and fears that may have been justi- 
fiable before the peace pact must now 
cease to influence national policy. " 



JAMES CALVIN KEENE 

"Cal" is one of the BIG men on the 
campus. Like a giant he towers 
over the rest of the fellows. If any 
campus dramatics ever need an Abra- 
ham Linco1r? ; Cal would be the man 
tor the role. 

Not only physically does Cal re- 
mind one oi Lincoln, but even men- 
tally. Cal has shown initiative in 
many college activities. When he be- 
lieves in a principle, Cal will pursue 
it as fearlessly as his prototype. Fur- 
thermore, like Lincoln, he is a logi- 
cal thinker. In reading Cal's fre- 
quent editorials in this paper, one can 
easily see the logical development of 
his arguments and perceives his ana- 
lytical mind at work. 

(It is said of Lincoln that he had a 
keen sense of humor. The same is 
true of Cal. We are, however, more 
fortunate in seeing Cal appreciate 
humor. A scintillating remark and 
back goes his head in a low peel of 
laughter. 

There is hardly one organization in 
which Keene has not officiated in one 
capacity or another. He puts ah his 
energy into whatever he attempts 
and never fails to make a good job 
of it. 

O ■ 



Thursday, 
Club 

Saturday, Nov. 2— Football 
Mt. St. Mary's at Lcban 0n ^ 

Sunday, Nov. 3 — Y. \y r ' 
Service. ' L ' A. 

Tuesday, Nov. 5 ^>udent p 
cr Meeting in ( T.ap e l at ^ 
„ _ ' ** 61- 

p. m. -'I 

\\ dues day, Nov. 6— Pp,. 
Club. eader, s 

MUSIC LOVERS ATTEND 

H*RRISBURG CONCERT 



Ai 



these who are attending 



the 



conceit series held at the Cl 
Street Auditorium of Harrisburg"' 
Madame Green, Dr. and Mrs 'l ^ 
der, Miss Myers, Miss Flory, a.i c 
Slichter, Hilda Hess and Garden S ' 
lor. • y 

The first oi five concerts was gi ve!1 
Thursday, October 24, at which tftn e 
Fritz Kreisler was heard. He pl ay 
ed from Bach, Saint Saens 
Tschackowsky and used some of his 
own compositions for encores 
among which was the most loved 
"The Old Refrain." The next con- 
cert will be November 14 w jj 
Piantogorsky. the celloist, and Rich- 
ards, the harpeschardinist, will play 

O . 

SOCIETY PLEDGES ARE 

SIGNED AT CHAPEL 



Another experiment was tried at 
chapel on Friday morning, October 
25, when the societies presented 
their membership cards to the new 
students}. Many brains were wrin- 
kled as the Frosh boys and girls 
struggled with the great problem I 
which society to join. As they made 
their decisions, they filled out the 
cards and placed them in boxes by 
the door. The cards were then sort- 
ed and given to the respective society 
presidents. 



DRYS AT WAR 

And still tlhe Prohibition war con- 
tinues. The newest battle is over 
Bishop Cannon's pronunciation that 
the buyer of liquor is equally guilty 
with the seller and should be pun- 
ished equally as severely. As a result 
the drys are now divided among 
themselves and peace seems far away. 



TRAVEL TO THE MOON 

The day may yet come in our own 
generation when man will be able 
to traverse the inter-stellar spaces. 
Fritz Von Opel has designed an air- 
plane that is propelled, like a sky 
locket, by a series of explosions. On 
its initial test it flew one and one 
quarter miles, showing that the idea 

as practicable. This method of pro- 
pulsion is tlje only one known to 
science that is able to be used in go- 
ing from one planet to another. One 
scientist figured that a rocket could 
be built that would travel 6.6 miles 
per second. At this speed it would 
reach the moon in just u hours. 
With present experimentation along 
these lines we may soon have new 
neighbors. 

O 



Eyes 
Examined 

Glasses 
Repaired 

DR. H. GRUMAN, 48 N. 8th St. 
Optometrist Lebanon 




Fine assortment of Watches, Ri n § s 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 

Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. JU 



SERVICE POSTPONED 



The second Y. W. C. A. Recogni- 
tion Service for new students who 
missed the first one, scheduled for 
Sunday evening, was postponed. This 
was done in order to give everyone 
the opportunity f attending the col- 
lege church service, where Mr. "Pete" 
Ingalls was the speaker of the even- 
ing. 



PRINTING 




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BOOKS, CAT A 
LOGUES, STATION- 



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MAY E. BERRY. 

38 So. Lancaster St-, 
Annville, Pa- 




LA VIE t OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, THURSDAY, OCTOBER, 31, 1929 



PAGE THREE 



**A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' 

—JONATHAN SWIF1 



CONDOLENCES TO BLUE BOOK SCRIBBLERS 

From the time you are born 

'Til you ride in a hearse 
There is nothing- so bad 

But it might have been worse. 

— Anonymous Philosopher. 
—LVC— 

Anne Gordon to Bcndigo: I miss you in English class this year. 

Maryellen Witmer (emphatically) : So do I. Since you're gone, I'm the 
dumbest one. 

— LVC — 

Prof. Light (to Biol 18 Class) — I see your trick. You want to ask a lot 
of questions that have no bearing on the lesson, just to take up time. That 
won't get you anywhere. 

Prof. Light (after brief pause) — Any more questions? 

— LVC— 

Joe Dawgone now learns that Bob Roudabush has secured a special li- 
cense to hunt . Oh, drat it, what IS the name of that animal, Bob? 

— LVC— 

BLINDFOLD TEST 200 YEARS OLD 

The fellow who thought he found a new trick of advertising cigarettes by 
the blindfold test was merely 200 years out of date. 

, In 1712 Joseph Addison wrote in the "Spectator" of a man who "after 
having tasted ten different kinds of tea, he would distinguish, without seeing 
the color of it, the particular sort which was offered him." 

— LVC— 

Frist Frosh: "I heard the score was 0-0 at the end of the third quarter." 
Second Frosh: "How many quarters are there?" 

— LVC— 

Flookie: "Can any of you girls tell me where [ can get an old costume 
to wear for skit about the Past of music?" 

Ruth March: "Sure, just take anything out of my clothes closet?" 

— LVC— 

And again we were not disappointed when Harriet Miller popped the usual 
question after reading the new W. S. G. A. rules when she said: "Do 'hops' 
mean that we aren't allowed to dance?" 

— LVC— 

Olive Morrow to an engaged person: "Are you going to have a wedding 
when you get married?" 

— LVC— 

Have you heard about the new weather forecast on the campus (pardon 
us, one part left us this year): "Sonny — Rainy — Showers." 

— LVC— 

One of our "Profs" tells us that the way he got rid of chewing gum in his 
classes was by putting his foot down on it. (He says he hasn't had a bit of 
trouble since.) 

— LVC— 

"Mickey" — the Trenton Flash — took 49.7 liters of air Saturday at T2, 
midnight. 

— LVC— 

John Ross Reed, to a member of the Star Course committee before start- 
ing the program Monday night: "Will those children on the balcony be 
quiet after the program starts or had we beter say something to them?" 

— LVC— 

We hear of a certain Sophmore who anticipated reading "Beowoulf" 
because he thought it was a dog story by Jack London. 



FALL CONFERENCE IS 

CAMPUS ACHIEVEMENT 

(Continued from Page 1) 



quent suicides and break-downs so 
common among youth. 

He proved beyond a doubt that 
we need a philosophy of life', for, he 
says, "we have much living of life 
hut little understanding of it." In- 
terpretation, clarification, and energy 
were named as the the three impor- 
tant elements, which supplied during 
the college career, should go into the 
philosophy of life. 

Dr. Limbert Speaks 

The Saturday afternoon lecture, 
presented by Dr. Paul Limbert, Pro- 
fessor of Religion at Franklin and 
Marshall College was based on the 
subject "Faculty- Student Relations."' 

This talk described many observa- 
tions made by Dr. Limbert in his 
work with discussion groups over 
which he presided. He favored nei- 
ther the Faculty nor Students but 
seemed to think that both could 
make certain concessions in order 
that the school might function more 
smoothly. This talk was based on 
Faculty-Student problems at large 
not necessarily those of L. V. C. al- 
tho many did apply. Dr. Limbert 
listed the points presented in his dis- 
cussion group and pointed out where 
each sore might be healed. All 
things pointed toward a functioning 
Faculty-Student Council. 

He read one statement taken from 
a quotation of the Dean of Women 
in Ohio University stating that, "Ad- 
visory Committees should be select- 
ed with the greatest care." This 
point shows why so many of the ac- 
tivities on a campus fail to do their 
duty. 

The open forum which followed 
his lecture was comparatively short 
altho important. During the forum 
:t was suggested that one way to in- 
sure better relations between faculty 
and students was to get them better 
acquainted with ^students. This, it 
was suggested, might be done in va- 
rious ways: Either by the students 
calling on Professors or by Profes- 
sors calling on students in their 
corns, or by holding conversation 
with the Professors after class. 

This conclusion was reached, that 
no matter what happens between 
Facutly and students, and no matter 
who is in the wrong, both parties 
should do their utmost to heal up any 
sores that may have been opened. 
Closing Address 

As an appropriate conclusion on 
Sunday afternoon to one of the finest 
week-end conferences ever held by 
any eastern college, H. P. Van Du- 
.^:n delivered a most inspiring address 
on "The Personality of Jesus in our 
Pagan Society". In it he stressed 
those lasting qualities of Christ's 
genuine personality and its influence 
on the pagan society of his day, con- 
trasting tnrt influence with that 
which he holds today. Following his 
addness, the entire body joined in 
the singing of "Follow the Gleam," 
after which Dr. Van Dusen officially 
adjourned the conference. 

O 

GEORGETOWN SWAMPS 

L. V. IN 27-0 VICTORY 

(Continued from Page 1) 



In the fourth period Bowman on 
a lateral pass play and Sipe by his 
broken field running carried the ball 
to Georgetown's goal line but a pass 
again was intercepted. 

The second half, as far as offense 
was concerned, was entirely Lebanon 
Valley's. Lack of scoring punch at 
critical moments prevented the locals 
from scoring two or three touch- 
downs. 

A decided improvement is expect- 
ed this week, and a victory over Mt. 
St. Mary's to average last year's de- 
feat is being expected by supporters 
of the team. 



YOUTH EXPERTS LEAD 

STUDENT COLLOQUIA 

(Continued from Page 1) 



among the students, for discussion 
with the faculty representatives ; as 
well as such difficulties as' may arise 
between faculty and students. The 
body will have no power of ultimate 
decision, but will serve as a media- 
tory body between the faculty and 
students in all arising college prob- 
lems. 

The Senate and the rest of the 
male students were discussed on the 
grounds of not turning in charges 
against offenders. It was empha- 
sized that the students should back 
their Senate and help it function prop- 
erly. A student gave the suggestion 
that perhaps the reason why the 
Senate could not command the re- 
spect it should is caused by the fact 
that they spent most of their time 
with minor offences. This seemed to 
leave an initial impression with the 
Freshmen that the Senate was : hefe 
primarily to deal with them. 

A Sophomore Council was sug- 
gested which would be under the di- 
rection of the Senate and which 
would handle all minor offences deal- 
ing with Freshmen. This Coucil 
would be headed by an upperclass-. 
man, preferably by a Junior so that 
no class antagonism would cause any 
prejudice in decisions made. 

Men — Women Relations 

The group which considered, the 
relations between men and women 
was under the efficient leadership of 
Dr. W. E. Kroll, known to students 
as "Bill." i 

Everyone in attendance benefited 
by the frank discussion of problems 
vital to young men and young wo- 
men. Ideas were exchanged and 
questions asked. In the background 
was always the capable leader steer- 
ing the group into such channels of 
information as would be most help- 
ful to them. 

Vocational Guidance 

In one of the most important dis- 
sion groups of the Conference, "Jack" 
Hart led his colloquium on the ever 
pertinent subject "Finding My Place 
in Life." The hours were few that 
the students and leader had together 
but in the limited time, a great num- 
ber of important questions were dis- 
cussed pro and con. The leader was 
rich in ideas and helped more than 
one in choosing his or her life work. 

First of all he said that the; term 
"vocatioal guidance'' was rapidly los- 
ing favor and that vocational counsel 
was being used in its stead. . The 
first startling question that Jack Hart 
hurled at his audience- was this, "Do 
you think a person, not knowing , what 
he wants to do, can find his answer 
in the college curriculum?" With this 
thought he began. 

In brief his subject was based on 
the belief that God has a plan for 
the entire universe. I We are a. part 
of the plan and God has a place for 
us. With cur religious background, 
why doesn't it steer us in the right 
path? If it is divine thought, how 
can human thought grasp it? With 
these two questions followed this, 
"What is Life?" Life is to be and to 
do. The great lives are those which 
are of use to others. A great exam- 
ple of this is found in the life of Je- 
sus. In order to do good, we must 
be good. There must be an attain- 
ment of character within before 
there is an attainment of success 
without. The final goal of life is to 
be like God. The immortality of 
Chrisftianity makes this idealism 
possible. 

Leaving this idea for a while, the 
discussion centered on the word 
"vocation" much means calling. The 
great spiritual calling has the divine 
idea that we are called to do some- 
thing. What do we mean by a 
"call"? The true call has the idea 
(Continued on Page 4) 



CONFERENCE PROVIDE ... 

< FOR SOCIAL MEETS 
. (Continued from.Pjgge 1) 



..The concbiding number^ 6h v the pro- 
gram was ''Our . Gang. Comedy/' a 
group of college girls " enjoying an 
evening of fun. This proved to, be a 
medley of presentations ''including the 
First Concept Study, by Yon, "played 
by Mildred Meyers; a Sailor Dance 
by Henrietta Wagner and' 'Gladys 
Hershey: "Seein Things at Night," a 
reading . by Ruth Shroycr; a guitar 
sole by Eva Peck; Monologue by 
"hyilis Trone, and "My Curly : Head- 
d Babbee," a vocal solo by Hester 
Thompson. 

"Dinner With Spice" 

As a part of the social side, of the 
Conference a banquet-dinner was 
held on Friday evening, in^the col- 
lege dining hall. It was . advertised 
as a "dinner with spice" and.. certain- 
ly was such. Dr. Wallace . acted as 
toast-master and., handled the. situa- 
tion very well by giving some new 
Scotch jokes. 

Dr. Gossard, upon being called on. 
stated that he wished the, students 
would be .earnest and attend as many 
of the sessions as possible. 

Roudabush, acting as . the, student 
speaker, then made a few. witty re- 
marks. . . „ „ „ . 

Following this each of the leaders 
jf the Conference were.,... introduced. 
"Jack" Hart in - his- remarks made 
quite, an. impression on .the students, 
Paul Limbert realized what a great 
problem the students have,. -on their 
hands and expressed his hopes and 
best wishes for success. . "Bill" Kroll 
said that he did not know why he 
had been chosen to lead in a confer- 
ence with such important men, but 
hat he would do his best. -in everj- 
vvay to make it a success. 

Leo Kohl, the Secretary of the Y. 
M. C. A. of Pennsylvania, .expressed 
lis,, appreciation for the Pioneering 
done by the Y's of Lebanon Valley 
College along the line of college con- 
ferences. "Pete" Jngalls, National Y. 
M. Secretary, and the friend, to .whom 
much credit is due for his assistance 
in the Conference, said that the stu- 
dents were to be praised for their 
fine . handling of such a situation as 
a week-end Conference. He also 
disclaimed any credit that might be 
attributed to h,m in the formation of 
the Conference. 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, 



OCTOBER, 31, 1929 



YQUTH EXPERTS LEAD 

STUDENT COLLOQUIA 

Continued from Page 3) 



of service. These questions were 
next in order: How did you get 
your call? What constitutes a call? 
Could you have that call without 
God's presence being near? What is 
the difference between God showing 
you a need and you seeing the need 
yourself?" How do you know the 
divine presence? How does divine 
and human meet so that human 
knows it? How do we look upon 
the inspiration of the Bible? The 
awareness of a call comes to you 
through human need. We are very 
conscious of God's presence. It is 
easy to get jpebple to ,see human 
needs but it is not easy to get them 
to meet them. God does call us in 
some way, indirectly by showing us 
the conditions around us. Am I con- 
scious of a divine presence in my 
life? We should be able to tell what 
the divine presence means to us? Is 
a call the use of your highest abili- 
ties — whether we should do what we 
can do best or rather what is needed 
most? 

After we have chosen our life work 
and are not satisfied, we should 
change it. There have been more 
mistakes from fixation than from 
change. "Don't keep a period after 
your profession; keep commas there." 
No two people are exactly alike in 
the world. Each person, by unique 
and individual endowments, is able 
to produce something that cannot be 
produced by any one else. There 
are more possibilites for* one who 
goes to college than for one who 
doesn't, as more fields are opened to 
the college student. We should find 
a place where we naturally fit in, 
and where we are best suited. 

Don\ fit into any niche is a good 
commandment. A niche suggests a 
static existence but life is dynamic 
We might say start from there but 
it is only a beginning. We should 
put more pep and enthusiasm in our 
lives. There is no place to sit down 
in the Universe. 

One big question we should ask 
ourselves when choosing our life 
work is this, "Can I be a Christian 
and do this or not?" If not, we 
should not go into it. What is life 
work preparing us for. Is it a means 
to an end or an end in itself? 

Finally "Jack" Hart gave a clear 
and definite ,path to follow when 
choosing our call. 

t. Find out what you can't do, 
and with the things you can do, nar- 
row it down and then choose. 

2. Comjmunicate with experts un- 
til your problem is settled. Develop 
the habit of going to see people who 
know. 

3. Turn to the lives of great leaders 
and see what they did and how they 
chose. 

4. Turn tc psychology and see 
what you can find there. 

5. Tests will give you another 
gleam of light on the way. 

6. Undergraduate activities bring 
out your powers and help to develop 
your talents. 

7. Summer work is very helpful in 
narrowing down the test of future 
professions. 

8. Cultivate the friendship of your 
professors and accept any good ad- 
vice they might offer. 

9. (Don't be worried about what 
you are going to do five years hence 
Be concerned about your life work, 
but think of the present. 

10. Overcome your hesitancy and 
accept all kind criticism. 

ir. Don't let your mind dwell on 
troubles. Most troubles come be 
cause people let them accumulate. 

12. Make your college career a 
normal career; tmake it four years 
of natural living. 

13. Keep in contact with the 
world. 



Those in brief were the high lights 
of "Jack" Hart's iluminating discus- 
sions. The questions startle us at 
first but they arouse some real think- 
ing on subject which ordinarily do 
not concern students. 

The discussions on vocational 
guidance were lively and each one 
who attended feels that by his ap- 
plying himself to everyday problems 
and giving the subject his earnest at- 
tention, each person can be guided 
into the right profession. 

Life Philosophy 
Constituting one of the most in 
teresting and profitable of the discus- 
sion groups, and arriving at several 
definite conclusions, the group on 
"Forming a Fhilosophy of Life" led 
personally by H. P. Van Dusen did 
much to animate the spirit of ttht 
conference. It met four times; at 
each session several pertinent ques- 
tion relating to our personal philo- 
sophies were commented upon by the 
group. 

After the first few minutes, the 
backwardness of the participants 
wore off and each entered into a 
frank discussion. "Pit" Van Dusen 
opened many new channels of thought 
and helped the students draw more 
clearly defined conclusions about 
many important matters. He helped 
to crystallize ideas on such disputed 
problems as success, hero-worship, 
working and ideal philosophies. 

Success is not to be measured by 
accomplishment, but is rather the 
courage to stand for one's convic- 
tions, a fidelity to the right. Hero- 
worship is profitable if one follows a 
good hero. Working philosophies 
should strive to approach ideal phil- 
osophies. Besides coming to these 
several conclusions, the group stir- 
red up thought which, rather than 
ending with the conference, will be 
really the beginning of new enter- 
prises on our campus. 



STUDENT CHOIR ADDS 

DIGNITY TO DEVOTIONS 



A student choir directed by Mrs. 
Ruth Engle-Bender and accompa- 
nied by Protessor Donald Fields fur- 
nished the special music for the Fall 
Student Conference. The choir was 
composed of members of the two 
glee clubs of the school. 

Their first appearance was at the 
Friday morning chapel service, where 
they created a worshipful atmos- 
phere in the beginning by beautifully 
chanting "The Lord Is In His Holy 
Temple." Friday evening's meeting 
was opened with a processional, and 
during the service the choir led the 
hymns and responses to prayer, in 
addition to singing a special an- 
them. At the Sunday morning com- 
munion service the same part was 
taken by the singers as on Friday, 
except that the service was beauti- 
fully closed by a recessional. 

O 



GHOSTS AND GOBLINS 

WILL REVEL IN GYM 



Many of the eerie spirits who come 
forth on the Eve of All Saints are 
expected to invade the gymnasium 
tonight when the Y. W. and Y. M 
give their annual Hallowe'en party. 
Every faculty member and all stu- 
dents are invited to attend the rev 
elry. One condition, however, the 
hosts and hostesses impose. This is 
one night they do not wish their 
guest to "Be Themselves," so they 
are urging all to mask. 



PRINTING 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER— The Printer 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 

Contractors 
Lumlar and Coal 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



SHOE REPAIRING 

Men — Soles $1.00 

Heels 50 

Ladies — Soles ••• -Qo 

Rubber Heels 40 

Leather Heels 25 

ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR, 

207 W. Main St. 



L V. 15 YEARS AGO 



PHILOS HOSTS AT 

HALLOWE'EN PARTY 



On October 30, 1915, there was a 
recurrence of the custom of having 
an annual Hallowe'en party. Philo 
gave the party that year. 

(The faculty, students and friends 
met in the chapel, whence they were 
led to their destination in Philo Hall 
by Satan and his guests. A grand 
march started the revelry, during 
which all revealed their identity. 
Such fun as bobbing for apples, 
throwing chestnuts, and fortune 
telling, followed. Of course some 
"spook" stories were told and finally 
thy "eats" were brought in. 

— From "College News." 

O 

MISS STEVENS FROSH 

MEMBER OF W. S. G. A. 



^ L. V. TEN YEARS AGO j 

FROM THE EDITOR'S 

WASTE BASKET 



Miss Mary Elizabeth Stevens was 
elected to represent the Freshman 
girls in the Women's Student Gov- 
ernment Association when the or- 
ganization met for this purpose on 
Tuesday afternoon. Tuesday after- 
noon. While Miss Stevens will at- 
tend all meetings, she will have no 
vote in any decisions. 



Prof. G1 hnm once remarked i n 
Physics: "I don't ithink I'm con- 
ceited when I say I'm not afraid of 
getting lost in any scientific field." 
The student felt sure that he would 
be a roaring success as a moving 
picure machine operator. 

"Paul Hilbert '19 spent the past 
Sunday, his first wedding anni/ C r- 
sary, with his wife in Paradise." 

The chemistry department re- 
ceived a new Professor, young and 
handsome. Several co-eds agiin 
selected the course. 

— From "College News." 

O 



PERSONAL INTERVIEWS 

GIVEN BY "Y" LEADER 



GRIMM'S 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



SPECIALS 
College Seal Paper, 50c per Box 
Bridge Lamps, complete, $1.25 
Adjustable Reading Lamps, complete, 
Regular Price $3.25 
NOW— $2.25 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Now Children, Don't Forget 

There is no pen-point made that 
can beat the 

WATERMAN 
Always buy Waterman Fountain 
Pens and you have the BEST. 
Buy at 

Bollmans 

Book & Stationery Store 

33 South Eighth Street, 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



For Quality 

Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 



Main Street 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Streat 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Private interviews with "Bill" Kroll 
on Friday afternoon were arranged 
for by the Student Conference Com- 
mittee on Interviews. Here person- 
al problems could be taken up in. 
absolute confidence and understand- 
ing which it is hard to maintain 
even with close comrades. The sur- 
prisingly large number of students 
who sought these interviews indicat- 
ed the real value of such an oppor- 
tunity. Perhaps the greatest results 
of our conference will come from 
these personal rather than from the 
group discussions. 



MENTION LA VIE 
TO ADVERTISERS 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Tjr a tj T>T?T *Q The Gift Store of Lebanon 
tl/VlVFJ^l^ ^ 757-759 Cumberland Street 



THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL 
20 PER CENT OF F ON ALL PIPES 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



CLOTHING F QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



KREAMER BROS. 



STEINITE RADIOS 
EASY ELECTRIC WASHE R 

COLUMBIA GAS STOVES AND RANGES 
RUGS AND LINOLEUMS 
"House of Better Values" 
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING 
328 W. Main St. Rhone 6R3 



Annvi 



lie, Pa- 



GETTYSBURG Vs. L. V. 
AT GETTYSBURG 
NOVEMBER 16 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



'31 QUITTIE NEED 
COOPERATION 
VISIT HARPELS! 




$900,000 ENDOWMENT 
EXPECTED BY 1930 

CHURCH SUPPORT NEED- 
ED FOR ROCKEFELLER 
RECOGNITION 



Efforts are being- made to close out 
all pledges which have been made on 
the college endowment, a campaign 
for which is now being made. In or- 
der to accomplish this purpose, Pres- 
ident Gossard is visiting all Quarter- 
ly Conferences in the Pennsylvania 
Conference with Superintendent Dr. 
Charles E, Foltz. At the same time 
Dr. J- R- Engle, President of the 
Board of Trustees, is visiting all 
Quarterly Conferences in the East 
Pennsylvania Conference with Super 
tendent Dr. S. C. Enck 

The campaign on endowment is ex- 
pected to close by April 1, 1930, which 
date has been fixed by the General 
Education Board (Rockefeller Board) 
in New York City as the last date on 
which they will recognize money col 
lected on endowment. All pledges 
prior to that time will call for 50 per 
cent in addition from the General 
Education -Board. For that reason 
every honorable effort is being put 
forth to collect all outstanding pledges 
from individuals and local churches 

It would be a serious blunder to 
fail in collecting these pledges and 
therefore, of necessity, lose half as 
much more from the Rockefeller 
Board. The amount that must be 
Collected from the conference is 
about $80,000. This will entitle the 
college to $40,000 from the Rocke 
feller Board. 

The total amount pledged to Leb 
anon Valley College was $199,000 — 
$24,000 for faculty salaries and $175,- 
°°o for endowment. If all pledges in 
wis campaign will be received, our 
to tal endoowment will be $900,000 

The people are responding very 
niCe ly in both Conferences and it is 
hoped to have every dollar before 
A P ri l 1, 1930. 

-O- 



B USINESS STUDENTS 

VISIT LINOLEUM CO. 



The students in the Business Ad 
Juration Department of the Col- 
e ge were the guests of the Arm- 
^ ° n S Linoleum Company, Lancas- 
je c ' two wee k s ago. The main ob- 
of the visit was to study the 
e "ods utilized in the manufacture 
t . lln oleum. The Department at the 
e - Was studying systems of large 



dIu'j pro( iuction. The company sup- 
guides who described and ex- 



Plied 
Plai 



Pan 



ne d each step in the process. 
^> e two departments of the com- 



{ . y which attracted the most atten- 
lJ? w ere the "stamping" and "in- 
^ rooms. The piecework sys- 

Ppo WaS vogue nere an( ^ an am pl e 
tL 0rtun ^y was presented whereby 



^students could observe economic 
o n * es being practiced. The visit, 
whole, was well worth the 
t ./ an d' the students are looking 

Her u nCXt tfip which wIU be to the 
t> Ptl e y Chocolate plant at Hershey, 



MODERN FARCE IS 

CHOICE OF JUNIORS 

"The Private Secretary," a farci- 
cal comedy in three acts by Charles 
Hawtrey, is selected by the class of 
193 1 for the annual Junior class play. 
The presentation, which is sched- 
uled for December nth, will be di- 
rected by Dr. P. A. W. Wallace. 

This type of comedy is digressing 
from the general run of formal and 
thought provoking plays which in 
the past hav.e entertained the college 
audiences. The class in giving this 
production hopes to cater to the 
students' wants as well as to the 
dramatic reputation of the school. 
The play itself is full of peculiar in- 
cidents, laughable passages, and 
dramatic actions. 

The tryouts for the play were 
held on Tuesday afternoon. A cast 
was chosen which the class believes 
will be able to put the play over in 
a successful manner. 

O 



KIWANIS CLUB HOST 
TO LMP FACULTY 

LEBANON BUSINESS MEN 
SHOW INTEREST IN 
COLLEGE 



LOST! EIGHT SOPHS 
AT TUG OF WAR 

FROSH TAKE HOME ROPE 
WHILE EIGHT SOPHS 
STAY HOME 

The deferred tug-of-war came to 
a sharp and decisive climax yester- 
day afternoon when the well coached 
freshman team pulled a fighting and 
determined sophomore team to de- 
feat in a short period of time, about 
fifteen seconds. 

The freshmen, after being held to 
ia standstill for two hours in the pre 
vious tug, were determined to win 
|this time. Coach Trezise had his men 
primed for the event. After giving 
them a short pep talk before the bat 
tie, they went into the fray with a 
yim and vigor that could not be 
squelched. 

At the other end of the rope stood 
ithe sophomores like the Spartans at 
iThermopole, greatly outnumbered 
but ready to hold or die. Because of 
physical incapacitation from the pre- 
vious pull and general lack of class 
Ispirit, eight of the varsity were not 
able to pull. With the remaining two 
regulars and three substitutes, among 
Ithem being "Brute" Rawha'user, the 
team lined up. 

At the crack of the gun both 
sides strained on the rope and the 
(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

RIVALS ADVERTISE 

SELVES ON CAMPUS 



In the* early hours of both Friday 
and Saturday mornings, some unex- 
pected visitors from our rival school, 
Albright, placarded the grounds with 
Sock 'em" and "Beat Lebanon Val- 
ley" posters. But the mere placing 
of signs around the grounds was not 
enough. They also entered the 
Men's Dormitory and tried to arouse 
the sleepers by placing posters un- 
der their doors. Evidently the stu- 
dents here are good sleepers, for no 
one in the dormitory offered any re- 
sistance or showed particular inter- 
est in the proceedings. 



Practically the entire factulty, as 
the guests of honor of the Lebanon 
Kiwanis Club, attended a dinner held 
in the Weimer Hotel on Thursday, 
October 31. Being interested in all 
affairs of the county, the Club focus- 
ed attention on the fact that Lebanon 
Valley, since the moving of Albright 
College to Reading, is now the only 
institution of higher learning in the 
county, and consequently deserves 
its support. The Club is anxious, 
therefore, to learn more of Lebanon 
Valley and had this means of taking 
steps toward getting a better under- 
standing of the school. 

Mr. Wintersteen, president of the 
Club, welcomed the visiting faculty 
and explained the purpose of the 
meeting. Messrs. Leopold, Sprecher, 
and Chapairo, members of the Club, 
also spoke on various subjects of in- 
terest to the group. 

Dr. Gossard was called upon to 
represent the faculty, and, in a 
speech in which he gave the Club 
some information on the College, 
he showed that the student body had 
increased fourfold since the begin- 
ning of the administration, that the 
faculty was now the ablest that was 
ever in charge and that during the 
present administration the College 
(Continued on Page 4) 
O 



OLDEST L. V. GRAD 

DIES IN EASTON 



NATIYE OF AFRICA 
ADDRESSESSTUDENTS 

REV. CAULKER GIVES 
VIVID PICTURE OF 
AFRICAN EDUCATION 



Mrs. Mary Weiss Reitzel, the only 
surviving member of the first class 
ever graduating from Lebanon Val- 
ley College and consequently the 
oldest Lebanon Valley graduate died 
suddenly on November 1st at the 
home of her nephew, Frederick W. 
Light, in Easton. 

Mrs. Reitzel was a native of 
Schaefferstown, p a> , and was born 
fon December 28, 1846. She received 
her Bachelor of Arts degree with 
the class of 1870. She was the 
widow of Dr. John R. Reitzel, a Con 
gregational minister, who died in 
1910. Mrs. Reitzel belonged to a 
family of great personages, her bro- 
ther being Judge John Weiss, presid- 
ing Judge of Dauphin County Courts 
for a long time. 

As Mrs. Reitzel was a member of 
Trinity U. B. Church, Lebanon, 
funeral services were held there, fol- 
lowed with interment in Mt. Leba- 
non Cemetery. 

O 



Rev. Caulker, of Sierra Leone, 
West Africa, was the interesting 
chapel speaker on Monday morning. 
He is a graduate of Albert Academy 
and deeply interested in its growtfi. 

In his explanation of the school 
systems in Africa, Rev. Caulker de- 
scribed the schools before and after 
the Christian influence. The name 
of the boy's school was the Pano. It 
was the popular belief that young 
folks were devoured by the teach- 
ers, termed as "devils." This spirit 
of the devil pervaded everywhere. 
During the course of four or five 
years, when the pupils remained in 
the stomachs of their teachers, they 
were supposed to have imbibed his 
nature to such an extent that when 
they came forth from the creature 
they were very much like him. 

The schools for the girls fitted 
them for the responsibilities of 
omanhood. Before the influence of 
Christianity, African schools were 
not in the woeful state the Occiden- 
tals imagine. 

The Christian schools succeeded 
in fitting men and women for life 
by turning their minds out of super- 

(Continued on Page 4) 



HISTORIANS ADOPT 
W0RLDPLATF0RM 

PROBLEMS, NATIONAL- 
INTERNATIONAL, LISTED 
FOR DISCUSSION 

Although the History Club had a 
meagre turnout at its last meeting at 
the home of Dr. Stevenson on 
Thursday night, October 31, much 
was accomplished in the way of plan- 
ning programs for the future informal 
meetings. A list of interesting topics 
for discussion was listed as fruitful 
material for the history students. The 
important subjects under fire relate to 
both foreign and national affairs. 

The issues catalogued under foreign 
affairs are: The World Court, Rus- 
sia-Chinese Affairs, Socialism in Eng- 
land, Inter-Allied Debts, New Ger- 
man Government, The Tariff, Cause 
of International Discord, Our Rela- 
tion to the Latin American States, 
Should the Philippines Be Granted 
Independence, and Is Nationalism 
Gaining or Losing Ground? In na- 
tional affairs we have listed, The 
Lobby, Tariff Question, Prohibition, 

(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

MME. GREEN ATTENDS 

DEAN CONFERENCE 



ALBRIGHT FIGHTS 
FOR 6-OJ30NQUEST 

JULIAN PROTEGES PROFIT 
BY BLUE AND WHITE 
FUMBLING 



A determined Lebanon Valley team 
on Saturday, Nov. 9, invaded the 
haunts of their ancient rivals, Al- 
bright College, formerly Schuylkill, 
and came within inches of upsetting 
all dope and gaining revenge for last 
year's defeat. Fate however did not 
smile favorably for the Blue and 
White, and Albright after having 
been pushed all over the gridiron for 
three quarters of the game squeezed 
a lucky touchdown over the goal line 
on the last play of the game. 

Previous to the game Coach Julian 
of Albright remarked that Albright 
had completely outgrown Lebanon 
Valley and that the outcome of the 
game was only a matter of how 
many touchdowns could be scored in 
the sixty minutes of play. 

Mylin's proteges soon showed that 
Julian's opinion was only a night- 
mare and before the game was many 
minutes old, had that individual 
crossing his fingers, grasping rabbit's 
feet and hunting four leaf clovers. 

The scrappy Lebanon Valley line 
battered the heavy Albright line and 
broke through to throw the Albright 
backs for a loss, time and again. For 
three-fourths of the game the ball 
was in Albright's territory and 
never once did they return it beyond 
the fifty yard mark. 

Sweeney Light knifed through 
tackle for telling gains and for sev- 
eral first downs. Sweeney played a 
wonderful game throughout and 
cracked the line with the effect of a 
much heavier man. "Jap" Albright 
threw passes with deadly accuracy 
but Bowman missed a chance to 
score when one of Jap's passes came 
in a direct line with the sun. Heller 
(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

STUDENTS PRESENT 

FIRST RECITAL 



Madame Green attended the ninth 
annual meeting of the Pennsylvania 
State Association of Deans of Wo- 
men which was held at the Penn 
Harris Hotel at Harrisiburg, Nov. 
8th and Nov. 9th. 

The dean of Swarthmore as presi- 
dent of the association presided at 
all the meetings. Friday nite they 
held a banuet at the Penn Harris at 
which a large number attended. The 
meetings were most inspirational and 
helping and each dean who attended 
found the Conference to be very ben- 
eficial. 

The national association conven- 
tion will be held in Februarj r at At- 
lantic City. 



The first students' recital of the 
season was given in Englc Hall 
Tuesday evening, November 12. 
Both elementary and advanced stu- 
dents took part, all of whom showed 
marked improvement over last 
year's work. The fact that there is 
more interest than ever in the work 
of the Conservatory was shown by 
the large number of College students 
present. The program w r as as fol- 
lows: 

Indian Pappoose, (Mueller), Alice 
Richie; Wistful, (Friml), Geraldine 
Harkins; Salterello, (Lack), Cath- 
arine Mills; Toccata in D, (Kinder), 
Olive Weigel; Sunshine Song, 
(Grieg), Life, (Curran), Sonny Boy, 
(Curran), Alcesta Slichter; Consola- 
tion No. 6, (Liszt), Dorothy Halde- 
man; Gavotte, (Martini), Margaret 
Young; Hondoo Song, (Bemberg), 
'Love is a Flame, (Ralph Cox), 
There is a Garden, (David Proctor), 
Helen Eddy; Cantique D'Amour, 
(Liszt), Mary K. Goshert; First 
Concert Study, (Yon), Mildred My- 
ers. 



FACE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1929. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Ldauys Knaub, '30 . . Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene, '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

aEPOETOSIAL STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

warren E. Burtner. '30 

liuth Snroyer, "62 

lius^ell Morgan, '31 

Kbi. L. Lauaabush, '31 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess. '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kaiozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder. '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant, '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscripti on $1-50 per ye ar 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



"Y" FALL CONFERENCE 

IN RETROSPECT 



"OF THE STUDENTS BY 
THE - STUDENT,S FOR THE 
STUDENTS" 

Not only was L. V. C. the scene 
of its first student conference two 
weeks ago, but the scene of the 
first conference of its kind ever held 
anywhere. To a casual observer the 
Conference probably appeared the 
same as those frequently held at va- 
rious other colleges. And in the 
final analysis it WAS a real con- 
ference such as we read of and sev- 
eral of us attend occasionally. But 
there is a difference. Those confer- 
ences heretofore held were planned, 
speakers secured, the delegates from 
all over the country registered, reg- 
istration fees collected ahead of time, 
and the place of conference an- 
nounced as some college or other — 
all this — by the National Council of 
the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. The col- 
lege where the conference was held 
did nothing more than act as host. 
In our case, the Conference Com- 
mittee comprised of students chosen 
from the entire student body, acting 
under the auspices of the Y. M. and 
Y. W., planned and executed every- 
thing — that is, the entire affair took 
its beginning on our local campus. 
The advice and suggestions of the 
local faculty were indispensable. 
Trustees and alumni also contribut- 
ed, but all that still keeps it a local 
affair. Delegates from surrounding 
colleges were invited as guests of our 
college. 

Thus Lebanon Valley College has 
taken a step forward in a new direc- 
tion and has done it successfully. 
Already she is being recognized by 
the National Council of the "Y." and 
by other colleges as the seat of two 
live Christian Associations which 
have demonstrated their ability to un- 
dertake projects "of the students, by 
the students, and for the students." 

O 

A BETTER L. V. C. 



The endowment drive which is be- 
ing carried on extensively at present 
is regarded sometimes by the stu- 
dents as an event with which they are 
not concerned. The students do not 
realize how much those in authority 
are doing for them, since it is the 
popular opinion that students are the 
only class of people who have the 
welfare of the institution at heart. 

Before April i, 1930, the churches 
of the United Brethren denomination 
will contribute $80,000 toward the 
endowoment fund. When that feat 



is accomplished the Rockefeller 
Board of Education will give Leba- 
non Valley $40,000. Do we as stu- 
dents realize what these church-going 
people are doing for us? Regardless 
of our personal inclination toward a 
denomination, we must recognize 
''the debt we owe" to the United 
Brethren clan. 

It will not be these persons who 
are contributing toward the endow- 
ment fund who will reap the results 
so much as the students themselves. 
Whether or not we like all existing 
conditions on the campus we must 
recognize that some day we will re- 
ceive our degree from Lebanon Vai- 
ley, our Alma Mater. When the 
money of this endowment fund ww 
have provided our campus with a new 
gymnasium, we, as alumni, win be 
ready to boast of Lebanon Valley's 
new building. But what are we do- 
ing now toward the realizations of 
our dreams of a "bigger and better 
Lebanon Valley"? Some of us return 
to our homes to .knock the institution 
because of petty and trivial conditions 
which disappear almost as soon as 
they appear. The. result may be that 
some persons will hesitate to pay the 
full amount pledged toward the en- 
dowment. 

Then, too, we might consider the 
possibility of contributing toward the 
endowment ourselves. That sugges- 
tion is for many an impossible one 
to follow but there are some who 
would be able to show their love of 
the institution in a substantial man- 
ner, while it remains for many to ex- 
press their love only in actions. 

As students and benefactors of this 
endowment fund drive, let us give all 
our support, in money, thought, and 
action, toward the reaching of the 
goal on April 1, 1930. 

O 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



WALL STREET PANIC 



Historians will speak of the "pros- 
perity panic of 1929". The recent 
sharp drop in stock prices was the 
worst panic Wall Street has ever 
had in peace times. On Thursday, 
October 24, all records for stock 
sales were broken with sales of 12,- 
894,450 shares. Then on the follow- 
ing Tuesday 16,000,000 shares were 
sold, totaling a loss of $15,000,000,000. 

A conservative estimate of the 
shrinkage of stock values during this 
period was placed at $50,000,000,000. 
However, American business is on a 
sound foundation and no fear is felt 
by business men in general regard- 
ing the outcome. Indeed the inves- 
tors themselves will lose little or 
nothing through it but the gamblers 
who were playing the market on 
margin have lost fortunes. 



MODERNIZING BERLIN 



Berlin is being made over into the 
World's City. Berliners are incor- 
porating into their city the most at- 
tractive features of London, New 
York, Paris and Chicago. With the 
Germans this is merely an economic 
matter and is being attacked in their 
usual untemperamental, business-like 
way. They have installed a Post 
Graduate course in the Art of Deal- 
ing with the tourist and have stan- 
dardized tipping at 10 per cent of the 
bill. 



TEAPOT DOME VERDICT 



Albert G. Fall was convicted by 
the Grand Jury of receiving a bribe 
from E. T. Doheny during the Tea- 
pot Dome Oil transactions. This 
verdict is unusual in that it is the 
first time that any person has been 
conviced for an action which he com- 
mitted while a member of a Presi- 
dent's cabinet. The verdict carries 
a maximum penalty of 3 years in 



r 



Among Our Seniors 




OLIVE MARIE WEIGLE 



A superficial observation of "Red" 
reminds one of the quotation "Much 
study is a weariness of the flesh." 
Olive is undoubtedly one of the most 
enthusiastic patronesses of good 
times on the campus. A keen ob- 
server, however, will discover more 
than that in this "Titian blonde." At 
the end of her junior year Olive al- 
ready proved herself at conservatory 
recitals a fine interpretator of pipe 
organ and piano music. Any suc- 
cessful musician must be subjected to 
innumerable hours of practice. Judg- 
ing by Olive's success, she undoubt- 
edly "grinds" out her hours of 
tedious practicing as other musi- 
cians do. 

Olive aspires to become a super- 
visor of public school music. In ad- 
dition to the local prestige that will 
bring her where she is employed, she 
may look forward to driving her own 
car. School boards in this state seem 
anxious to have the musical heads 
move quickly from place to place. 
Keep your eyes on the traffic "cops", 
Olive. 

This year Olive is president of the 
W. S. G. A. and has the additional 
honor of being the first Conservatory 
student to fill this responsible posi- 



tion. 



-O- 



iALLO WE'EN SPRITES 

FROLIC AT PARTY 



The college gymnasium on Thurs- 
day evening, October 31, was turned 
nto the haunt of witches, ghosts, gyp- 
sies, and other Hallowe'en sprites. A 
huge shock of corn held the center 
of the scene, while Jack-o'-lanterns 
grinned from every nook and corner. 

General confusion and conjecturing 
as to "who was who" was not re- 
lieved until after the grand march, 
when orders were given to unmask. 
As special features of the evening 
Helen Franklin gave a clever tap 
dance and Dr. Wallace told some of 
his famous French Canadian ghost 
stories. - Games, refreshments, . and 
socializing filled the remainder of the 
evening. 

The party was given by the eight 
major campus organizations. 



•O- 



Y. W. RECOGNITION 



ROY ALBRIGHT 



"Jap", altho small in stature, is a 
"star" man in many ways. Quiet, 
(unassuming yet capable, he stands as 
a leader among his classmates. At 
football he is the mainstay of the 
'team and is brilliant at broken field 
running and passing. In brief, he is 
all that can be asked for in a quar- 
terback. As captain of the basket- 
ball team this year he is expected to 
lead his mates to many victories. He 
is also a dependable baseball player, 
holding down the center field posi- 
tion on the L. V. nine. 

Yet Jap is not only an athlete. In 
the evenings he can be found in his 
room "hitting the books". He tack- 
les his studies just as he does sports 
and his grades show the result of his 
application. 

Above all, Albright is well liked 
by his associates. As a mark of 
their esteem they have elected him 
to fill the office of President of the 
Men's Senate and as head of that 
body he metes out justice impartially 
to all offenders. 

Athlete, student, a man among 
men, and an all around good fellow 
—that is "Jap". 

O 

ALUMNI PROUD OF 

MYLIN GRIDMEN 



There were very many Alumni at 
the Lebanon Valley vs. Albright 
game on Saturday. They, plus others 
who saw the game, tell us that L. V. 
put up a very good fight and deserve 
quite as much credit as Albright. Sev- 
eral of the alumni, too, have said that 
L. V. has a better team this year than 
they have had for several years. 

O 

Y. W. CABINET GUESTS 

AT WALLACE DINNER 



On Friday evening, November 1, 
Mrs. Wallace, an advisor of the Y. W. 
C. A., entertained the Y. W. Cabi- 
net at her home at an informal sup. 
per. The girls enjoyed a delightful 
evening and went back to their rooms 
feeling happy and grateful toward 
their advisor and hostess. 

O 



The second Y. W. C. A. Recogni- 
tion Service for new students who 
missed the first one, was held Sunday 
evening, Nov. 3rd, in North Hall Par- 
lor. 

At the conclusion of a song service 
of favorite selections, these new girls 
were taken up to the altar by their 
big sisters and presented with pins 
and lighted candles. The service was 
closed by a recessional, "Follow the 
Gleam." 



prison and a fine of $300,000— triple 
the amount of the bribe. Fall's law- 
yers naturally took steps immediately 
for a retrial. 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1929. 



PAGE THREE 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

—JONATHAN SWIF1 



"Now, in case anything should go wrong with this experiment," said 
I>r. Bender, "we and the laboratory with us will be blown sky high. Come 
a little closer, boys, in order that you may follow me." 

—LVC— 

HOME-TOWN BOY MAKES GOOD!!!!!!!! 

"KERMIT TAYLOR HONORED" 

Kermit Taylor, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Taylor, now attending Leba- 
non Valley College, has been selected as a soloist for the college glee club. 
He has also been selected to have the leading part in the play, "The Jour- 
ney's End", which the students are going to put on in the fall. Mr. Taylor 
accompanied Dr. P. A. W. Wallace of the English department to New York 
where they attended a performance of the play. 

"Mr. Taylor during his high school career took an active part in musicals 
of all kinds." 

(Extract from Red Lion "Hilltop." 
—LVC— 

BEWILDERED UPPERCLASSMEN 

The Freshmen are 'usually the ones who furnish the campus with laughs 
from their exam papers, but this season the upper-classmen have done their 
share. 

"Corker," in Bible 44, said Shem was the most northern point reached 
by the Chilidren of Israel in their wanderings. 

Anne Gordon, having taken three exams in one day, handed Dr. Wallace 
her English 43 paper, and said, "Thank you." 

Miss X of the senior class is a bit weak on spelling. Her blue books 
last week discussed an "all factory nerve," the "Duke of Marl Berry" and 
"Macivalley." 

— LVC— 

He— "And what does your father do?" 

Another He — "Oh, he's in the lumber business." 

He — In the lumber business?" 

A. He— "Yes, but only in a small way. He sells matches." 

— LVC— 

John Snyder's roommates found him laughing uproariously last week. 
Then subsiding for a few minutes he managed to say, "I know the best joke 
to tell you but I can't remember it." 

— LVC— 

With due respect to Webster, Ruth March believes she has a better 
definition for the word "model" — A cheap imitation of the real thing. 

You may be correct, Ruth, but HOW will you explain the definition 
w hen our "college widows" hold "sessions" on "model husbands." 

— LVC — 

Kermit Taylor in French sight translation giving description of young 
glr l ; "I admired the freshness of her paint." 

— LVC— 

A bricklayer said to a foreman on a new job: "I'd like to work here, 
kut I can ' t find a p ] ace to p ark my car » xhe foreman! replied: "I guess 
y °u won't do. This is a high-class job, and we want only bricklayers who 
hav e chauffeurs."— ("Daily Cardinal" of Wisconsin University.) 



r 



In and About the Literary Societies 

PROFS AT PHILO 



Pbilokosmian Literary Society pre- 
sented an exceptional program at its 
meeting November 1. 

Since exams were in the immediate 
future, it was quite fitting that Pro- 
fessor Wagner should speak on "A 
Professor's Idea of Examinations". In 
his talk he stated that exams are not 
always a good thing but that they are 
the best we have at present. He fur- 
ther said that students should have 
more enlightenment on how to take 
them and should not subject them- 
selves to a nervous strain because of 
them. 

Eshelman delighted the society with 
two piano solos which were played in 
his own superb style. He responded 
with an encore. 

Professor Wallace closed the pro- 
gram with a two-fold talk. In the 
first part he showed slides of scenes 
from last year's Philo play, "St. 
Joan". These were greatly enjoyed, 
especially by members of the cast, of 
whom there were quite a few present. 
The second part was an illustrated 
lecture on mountain climbing in the 
Alps and the mountains of Canada. 
The illustrations were taken by Dr. 
Wallace and his tales of some of his 
close "shaves" during these climbs 
held his hearers spellbound. 

Following the critics report the 
the meeting was thrown open for 
general remarks. Among others, Joe 
Rettew spoke a few words. 



-O- 




Miss Miriam Muth, of the class of 
'29, and now teaching in the High- 
spire High School, visited here on 
Monday, Nov. nth. 

Mr. Caulker, the native worker 
from Sierra Leone, Africa, who spoke 
jih chapel, Monday morning, men- 
tioned Mr. Sumner, an L. V. alumnus. 
Mr. Sumner is probably remembered 
by many people of this section. He 
came from Africa to Lebanon Valley 
in 1898. He was graduated from here 
in 1902, and then returned to Africa 
to work there and to promote the edu- 
cation of his native people. He is es- 
teemed there as one of the great men 
of his country. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Burner who 
recently announced the engagement 
of their daughter, Benetta Burner, to 
Mr. Paul Piersol now announce their 
marriage on Sunday November 10, at 
Harrisburg Penna. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Piersol are graduates of the class 
of '28. After the 1st of December 
they will live in Coatesville, Penna. 
O 

Y. W. NOTES 



KALO "FROSH" NIGHT 



The Y. W. C. A. "Friendly Hour" 
was held Sunday evening in North 
Hall Parlor. The meeting was in 
charge of Helen Hand. The subject 
of the evening was poetry. Poems 
selected were "Trees," by Joyce Kil- 
mer, read by Helen Hand; a part of 
Spenser's "Faerie Queen," and 
Blake's "Songs of Innocence," read by 
Margaret Smyser; two selections from 
"Poems of the Dawn," entitled "Is It 
Raining, Little Flower" and "Tell Me 
About the Master," read by Sarah 
Ensminger. A piano solo, "Confi- 
dence," by Mendelssohn, was played 
by Alcesta Slichter. The meeting was 
closed with the reading of a poem by 
Hilda D. Buckley entitled "It Is Not 
Finished." 



The Kalozetean Literary Society 
held its 'Frosh' program last Friday 
evening during the usual literary ses- 
sion. The "Trumpeting Trcvuba- 
dours", Sonny Russel and William 
Barnes, entertained with an exhibition 
of close harmony. Then Walter 
Krumbiegel rendered "Gunga Din" by 
Kipling. Richard Early provided 
music by singing and playing current 
numbers. The high spot was, how- 
ever, when Forrest Clark, maestro of 
the piano and embryo composer, in- 
troduced the society to one of his own 
compositions. The Trumpeting 
Troubadours then concluded the 
program with "Bottoms Up." 
O 

CLIO ADMINISTERS 

ITS FIRST DEGREE 



The regular meeting of Clio, Fri- 
day, Nov. 1, was in charge of the 
President, Mary McCurdy. At this 
time the new pledges were given the 
first degree. This makes them mem- 
bers of Clio until February when the 
other degrees will be given, provided 
they have followed the standards 
drawn up by Clio last spring. 

O 

FRESHMAN GIRLS 

TAKE DELTA PLEDGE 



Delphian Literary Society held their 
weekly meeting, in Delphian Hall, 
Nov. 1st. This meeting was of in- 
terest because of the admittance of 
girls on pledge. This pledge lasts 
until the first of the year. 

After each girl had knelt before 
Delta Lambda Sigma and taken her 
pledge, Elizabeth Lefever read a se- 
lection of poems, Eleanor Kissinger 
gave a piano solo, and Violet Morton 
gave "Smiles", a number of jokes, 
which she enjoyed as much as her 
audience. 

In the critic's report, the society, as 
a whole, was surprised to learn that 
two of the poems read by Elizabeth 
Lefever were he own compositions. 

O 

SITLINGER TO FILL 

VACANCY ON SENATE 



Albert Sitlinger has been elected 
a member of the Men's Senate by 
the Senior Class to fill the vacancy 
created by the resignation of one of 
ithe members. Burtner and Sitlinger 
(were nominated by the faculty with 
<the decision of the election falling 
upon the latter. 



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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1929. 




Thursday, Nov. 14th — Star 

Course at 8 o'clock. 
Friday, Nov. 15th — Kalo-Delphian 

Joint Session. 
Saturday, Nov. 16th — Gettysburg 

vs. L. V. at Gettysburg, Pa. 
Sunday, Nov. 17th — Y. W. C. A. 

North Hall Parlor, 5:45 p. m. 
Tuesday, Nov. 19th — Student 

Prayer Meeting, in Chapel, 6:15; 

p. m. *■ 

O 

AL3RIGHT FIGHTS 

FOR 6-0 CONQUEST 

(Continued from Page 1) 



tried hard for several passes but the 
elusive pigskin filtered between his 
fingers. 

Cunjack had the Albright backfield 
in desperation trying to get away 
from his deadly tackling. Both teams 
tackled with a fury that is not seen 
in many a season's games. Reese in 
tackling Emmet received a slight 
concussion and had to be taken from 
the game. The need of reserve cen- 
ter material then became evident. 

In the final quarter Albright made 
a march down the field led by Weigle 
and Petrolanus. The first advance 
was checked but a poor kick gave 
them the ball on Lebanon Valley's 
thirty yard line. They started an- 
other advance that could not be de- 
nied and Petrolanus carried the ball 
over the line' on the last play of the 
game. 

Lineup: 

L. V. C. ALBRIGHT 
Cunjack L. E. Neff 

Bartolet L. T. Snyder 

Lechthaler L. G. Lilly 
Reese C. F. Hatton 

Wood R. G. Carney 

Kelly R. F. McFarlane 

Heller R. E. James 

Patrizio Q. B. Haines 

Zappia L. H. B. Norris 

Albright R. H. B. L. Hatton 
Nye F. B. Petrolanus 

Subs: L. V.— Liight for Nye, Daub 
for Patrizio, Bowman for Zappia; 
Stone for Bartolet; Kazlusky for 
Wood; Orsino for Heller; Heller for 
Orsino; Sipe for Daub; Wood for 
Kazlusky; Bartolet for Stone. Ref- 
eree, R. D. Evans, Ursinus. Umpire, 
J. E. Keady, Lehigh. Field Judge, 
F. E. Williams, Trinity. 

Mt. ST. MARY'S vs. L. V. 

Lebanon Valley's stalwarts were 
were held to a stalemate by a heav- 
ier Mt. St. Mary's eleven' on the 
Bethlehem Steel Field at Lebanon on 
November 2 in the only home game 
of the season. Local followers were 
disappointed that the Blue and White 
did not roll up a score because Leb- 
anon Valley outplayed their oppo- 
nents in every department of the 
game, except punting. Connell, Mt. 
St. Mary's, averaged 60 yards on his 
punts while the best Heller and Daub 
could average for Lebanon Valley 
was between 35 and 40 yards. In the 
number of first downs registered 
Lebanon Valley had about 15 and 
Mt. St. Mary's 3. 

Leba non Valley's defense as usual 
smothered any thrust Mt. St. Mary's 
offered. Cunjack, Lechthaler, Stone 
and Bartolet were outstanding in the 
department. 

The offense functioned smoothly 
until within a few yards of the goal 
and each time the necessary punch 
was lacking. 

Albright played brilliantly in the 
backfield for Lebanon Valley. His 
passes were flipped accurately to the 
waiting arms of Heller, Cunjack, 
Light and Sipe, all of whom made 
substantial gains. 

Captain Ryscavage and McCall, 
ends for Mt. St. Mary's, probably 
were the main reason for Lebanon 
Valley's inability to score. These 
two lads prevented Lebanon Valley 
backs from getting loose for a 
touchdown. 



READERS CLUB STUDY 

LIFE OF EDWARD BOK 



; The regular bi-monthly meeting of 
the Readers' Club was held at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Wallace Oct. 
30, 1929. 

Phyllis Trone, for the first on the 
program, discussed the difference be- 
tween an auto-biography and a bi- 
ography, taking as examples, Sand- 
burg's "Life of Lincoln" and "The 
Americanization of Edward Bok." 
Mary Snyder followed this with a re- 
view of the book "The Americaniza- 
tion of Edward Bok." She gave a 
very interesting talk and was not 
sparing in her details of the auto- 
biographer's life. After this, Helen 
Hain presented her opinions of the 
so-called process, Bok's American- 
ization. 

Ruth Shroyer told the readers what 
she thought was the most striking in- 
cident of his life. As this was rather 
difficult to do, several of the more es- 
sential factors of his life were men- 
tioned. 

After everyone had discussed the 
book thoroughly, Dr. and Mrs. Wal- 
lace adding some interesting facts not 
contained in the book, Mary Ax gave 
a report on "Good Companions," the 
book of the month for September. 
This book had been reported as re- 
viewed at the last meeting but had 
been postponed to this meeting. 

The meeting was most interesting 
and helpful for everyone who was 
there obtained a clear-cut picture of 
Edward Bok. 

— O 

KIWANIS CLUB HOST 

TO L. V. FACULTY 
(Continued from Page 1) 



had advanced from $66,000 deficiency 
to a subscription of $900,000. 
I Coach "Hooks" Mylin, speaking 
1 about our athletics, showed how the 
! Lebanon County people can help 
i Lebanon Valley athletics by attend 
j ing the home games, for lack of 
patronage is the reason Lebanon 
Valley finds it hard to play many 
|tof them here. 

( The faculty is most grateful to the 
Kiwanis Club for its keen interest in 

I our institution and hope that this 
will mark the beginning of more in- 
timate relation between the two. 
Work hand in hand with altruistic 
bodies of this kind can not help but 
brighten the future of the Lebanon 
Valley College. 



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Envelopes $1.00 

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Jess Pugh 

The second number of the Star 
Course program will be held to-night 
in the chapel at 8 p. m. with Mr. 
Jess Pugh as the attraction. 

Air. Pugh is most versatile, being 
in the same evening a humorous en- 
tertainer, an interpretative reader and 
a character delineator. He has also 
the rare ability to originate new num- 
bers of which his "Movie Piece" and 
the ''Hair-Lipped Boy" are rich sam- 
ples. Mr. Pugh renders Kipling with 
such force and virility and with such 
(wonderful insight into the author's 
meaning that he is heralded at once 
as a reader of power. On the other 
hand, his humorous sketches in Ger- 
man and Irish dialect are excruciat- 
ingly funny. His rendition of Scotch 
stories and ballads convulses his audi- 
ence with laughter and displays an- 
other phase of his unusual versatil- 
ity. 

O 

NATIVE OF AFRICA 

ADDRESSES STUDENTS 
(Continued from Page 1) 



stitious channels and giving them 
knowledge of real facts. 

The founder of the Academy, Mr. 
Albert, was a Lebanon Valley man, 
as were also Mr. Sumner, Mr. Weid- 
ler, and Mr. Martin. Albert Acade- 
my has always been greatly in- 
fluencd by Lebanon Valley, who has 
contributed toward her support. Mr. 
Caulker conveyed the deep gratitude 
of his native folk for any support 
which the present student body might 
give to "Lebanon Valley in Africa." 



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AN EXPIRED CLUB 

Though students may think that the 
same clubs and organizations exist 
now as they did formerly, they are 
mistaken. 

Some years ago they had, here, one 
which was called "The Mathematical 
Round Table." Professor Lehman was 
then the Professor of mathematics. 
This club met to discuss questions 
such as "Why I Study Mathematics" 
and "Why Students Do Not Study 
Mathematics." 

From "College News." 
O 



HISTORIANS ADOPT 

WORLD PLATFORM 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Committee on Crime, "St. Lawrence 
Wfater Ways, Industrial Situation in 
the South, Negro Problem, Immigra- 
tion, Farm Relief, and Problems of 
Big Business. 

This evening the History Club will 
hold a luncheon in the small dining 
hall at five o'clock. Professor Shenk 
will be the speaker. 



LOST! EIGHT SOPHS 

AT TUG OF Wa$ 

(Continued from Page 1) 



sophs gained a lot of rope on th 
drop, anyhow two inches. Howeve 
the ten frosh, with a magnifi Cent ' 
rally, swooped the sophs off their 
feet and before they could reg a i n 
their footholds they went sliding 
over the line and the gun announced 
defeat. 

Coach Hertzler congratulated 
Coach Trezise on his victory ari( j 
stated that the better team won 
However Trezise gave it as his opin- 
ion that it was a moral victory f or 
the sophs. 

The lineup for the freshman Was 
as follows: Krumbiegel, Wlerner 
Morrison, Ulrich, Myers, Goodman' 
iClemens, Schrope, Speg, and Bin- 
oskic. The sophs lineup was Taylor 
Allen, Hawhouser, Keene, and Mund 



STUDENTS! ALUMNI! 
GETTYSBURG vs. L. V. 
CHEER FOR THE 
BLUE AND WHITE 




YOU'D 

get lonesome . . . too! 




IF SONS sent their Dads and 
Mothers away to College, 
what a flock of lonesome 
young men there would be 
at home! 

Don't think for a minute that 
your folks never yearn for the 
sound of your voice ... be it lyric 
tenor or a more profound basso. 

They do. 

And we have provided a way for 
you to send your voice to them and 
to bring theirs to you. 

There's a Telephone near 
you on the Campus. 

Just for fun call 

Home tonight 






W ATCH L. V. BRING HOME 
VICTORY 
FROM U. S. MARINES 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



BEST WISHES TO CLIO 
ON HER 
59TH ANNIVERSARY 



pss== 

yOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1929. 



NUMBER 8 



DELEGATE SENT TO 
BUCKNELL CONFLAB 

MISS MILLER ATTENDS 
INTER-COLLEGE 
MEET 



Leah Miller represented our Wo- 
men's Student Government Associa- 
tion at the 22nd Annual Conference 
of the Woman's Intercollegiate Stu- 
dent Government Association held 
from Nov. i.|-i6 at Bucknell Uni- 
versity, Lewisburg, Pa. 

It was the purpose of this year's 
Conference to unify Student Govern- 
ment in the United States and to 
discuss the relationship of Student 
Government to national and inter- 
national problems. Fifty colleges 
located in the region between Maine 
and Florida, and the Atlantic Coast 
and the Mississippi River, were rep- 
resented. 

Mr. Norman Thomas, executive 
director of the League for Industrial 
Democracy, from New York City, 
was an outstanding personality of 
the Conference. One of his main ad- 
dresses was on "What May America 
Expect of Her College Graduates"? 
In his speech "Race, Religion, and 
Fraternity," he set forth these three 
factors as the principles which unify 
us. 

Several talks were given by stu- 
dent representatives from various 
colleges on such subjects as "Devel- 
opment of Fellowship in the College 
Community," "The Opposing Minor- 
(Continued on Page 4) 
-O 



CLIO PUTS FINAL 
TOUCHES ON PLAY 



TWELVE CHILDREN OF 
ANNVILLE IN 
CAST 



The fifty-ninth anniversary of the 
Clionian Literary Society will be eel 
Crated Saturday evening, November 
«3i when Josephine Preston Pea- 
body's drama, "The Piper," will be 
tlle feature of the evening. 

The cast, numbering forty-five, un- 
der the supervision of the directress, 
Mls s Mary K. Wallace, has been 
forking dilligently toward a credit- 
a ^e dramatization of the old legend 
° f l 'ie Pied Piper of Hamelin. Due 
^e length of the play the anniver- 
Sar y events will begin promptly at 
e, eht o'clock in Engle Hall. 

Out of tthe forty-five members in 
^ e cast thirty-three are Clionians 
f the other twelve are town 
^ dies. The unique feature about 

, e Play i s that it is being staged 

Rf an a " ? irls ' cast ' wit ' 11 Ma<lt ' lim> 

' e Portraying the life of the Piper 
'urnself 

nere will be a short program as 
luminary to the drama which 
a °e followed by a reception in 
^ Alumni Gymnasium. 
ln al plans for the evening's enter- 
nrn ent are being formulated by 
(Continued on Page 3) 



STAR COURSE ORATOR 
WILL ADDRESS CHAPEL 



Tomorrow morning, in the regu- 
lar chapel period, Dr. Harry F. 
'Ward, Professor of Christian Ethics 
(at Union Theological Seminary, will 
address the students on the subject, 
"Plunderers, Parasites, Producers". 
In the periods following the chapel 
services he will hold two conference 
groups. One of' these will be on the 
.'subject, "The Economy Basis for 
World Peace" and the other "Do We 
Want Free Speech?" The exact 
time of these two groups will be an- 
nounced later. 

Professor Ward comes to our 
campus as the second of the month- 
ly chapel speakers to be brought here 
by the Star Course Committee. The 
hrst of these speakers, Mr. Upton, 
will be remembered by all who heard 
him for his witty, magnetic address. 
Mr. Ward, altho not a humorist, is 
well versed on economic matters and 
will be very interesting. He is the 
author of several booklets on these 
and allied subjects. 

O 



VARSITY MEN ON 
MARINE ELEVEN 

BLUE & WHITE PRIME 
TO CRUSH VICTORS 
OF LAST YEAR 



Lebanon Valley will bring to a 
close its 1929 football season, Satur- 
day, November 23, with the Quantico 
Marines, at Island Park, Harrisburg. 

This Marine eleven is composed of 
college experienced football players. 
While practically all of them left col- 
lege before graduating, most of them 
have won their letters during their 
stay in college. 

In making a survey of the eleven, 
they have two outstanding backfield 
men who are more than likely to give 
us plenty of opposition. Peasley, 
one oi their best men, played for the 
University of Maine a few years, and 
Dashnell, the other flashy ball toter, 
got his preliminary training in foot- 
ball at the University of Louisiana. 

On the line they have Ayers, a for- 
mer Dartmouth player; Porter, a 
(Continued on Page 4) 
O 

GLEE CLUB PLANS 

FOR CONCERT TOUR 



East Saturday the President of the 
Men's Glee Chib, Calvin Keene, and 
the Business Manager, Robert Roud- 
abush, made a trip to Baltimore to 
arrange concerts for this season's 
trips. Stops were made at Dallas- 
town and Red Lion. Six ministers 
were interviewed and the prospects 
for concerts look favorable. Those 
interviewed were Rev. E. V. Shan- 
non of Dallastown, Rev. Fleming of 
Red Lion, and the Reverends 
Sprenkle, Leech, Cawlcy, Stine, and 
Koontz, of Baltimore. 

This is the first time in recent 
years that this method of arranging 
concerts has been tried. In former 
years all arrangements were carried 
on through correspondence. 



I COLLEGE CALENDAR ! 

I I 



Friday, November 22 — .Meetings 
of the campus societies. 

Saturday, November 23 — Fifty- 
ninth Anniversary of Clionian 
Literary Society at 8 o'clock in 
Engle Hall. 

Football Game at Harrisburg; L. 
V. C. vs. U. S. Marines. 

Sunday, November 24 — Y. M. and 
Y. . W. meetings. 

Wednesday, .November 27 — 
Thanksgiving recess begins at 
4 o'clock. 

Monday, December 2 — Thanks- 
giving recess ends. 



ALUMNAE RETURN 
HOME FROM AFRICA 



MISSES BRENNEMAN AND 
BACHMAN IN U. S. 
ON FURLOUGH 



Miss Ida Elizabeth Brenneman, of 
the class of '26, has recently returned 
from West Africa where she finished 
her first term of service in the mis- 
sion field of the United Brethren 
Church. 

Miss Brenneman while at L. V. 
was a very active Student Volunteer 
worker. Upon graduating she im- 
mediately went to Africa to give her 
services there. Since her return, 
Miss Brenneman, like Miss Susan 
Bachman of the class of '18, also a 
missionary to West Africa and now 
upon her second furlough, is visit- 
ing various churches and giving ad- 
dresses concerning Africa anr' her 
w ork there. 

Miss Brenneman plans to talk 
in the United Brethren Church at 
Cleona in connecion with their 
ffhank-Offering program. Doubtless- 
ly she will bring a message well 
worth while hearing. L. V. can al- 
ways feel proud of having graduated 
such an alumna as Miss Brenneman. 
Miss Susan Bachman 

Miss Susan Bachman, one of our 

(Continued on Page 4) 

G 

MR. ESHELMAN PLAYS 

AT HOTEL ROOSEVELT 



Robert Eshelman, talented tickler 
of the keys in classical as well as 
jazz music, played for a banquet held 
at the Hotel Roosevelt, New York- 
City, last Friday evening . < 

Mr. Eshelman rendered three num- 
bers as interludes between dance 
numbers. His renditions were "Noc- 
turne," Op. No. 2, "Etude," Op. No. 
5, both composed by Chopin. His 
last number was "Etude Artis- 
tique." 



TO SUBSCRIBERS! 



As the Thanksgiving recess be- 
gins Wednesday, November 27, at 
4 p. m , the next issue of La Vie 
is scheduled for December 5. 



CHURCH PLANS FOR 

CHIME DEDICATION 



On Sunday afternoon, November 
24, dedication services for the new 
Tower Chimes of the College Church 
will be held. The chimes are a gift 
to the church from Mr. and Mrs. C. 
M. Coover in memory of their par- 
ents, Dr. and Mrs. William Coover, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Kreid- 
er. The service should be of inter- 
est to every student as well as every 
member of the United Brethren de- 
nomination. 

The first peal of the chimes will 
be heard at 3:45 p. m., followed by 
music by the choir until four o'clock, 
when the dedication exercises will 
begin. 

The chimes will be played by elec- 
tricity, and operate automatically. 
The total weight is over twelve thou- 
sand pounds. The finest architects 
and builders have been employed in 
the installation. 

O 



HUMORIST PLEASES 
IN CONCERT SERIES 

STAR COURSE ARTIST 
MIXES FUN WITH 
HOMELY ADVICE 



Jess Pugh, humorist extraordinary, 
kept the chapel filled with the sound 
of one laugh after another last 
Thursday evening, November 14th. 

His impersonation of character 
sketches was all that it should be. 
Each little gesture and tone of voice 
completed each portrayal. His char- 
acters were not exclusively Hoosier 
characters, but he placed them in In- 
diana, at a reception given in honor 
of the champion hog-caller of that 
state. The speakers at the dinner 
were Deacon Parr, not above or be- 
low, but just par, Elmer Wortz, the 
champion, and Miss Tillie Jones, a 
•Sunday school teacher for forty 
years. 

He told how the origin of Hallow- 
e'en had its inception in the Euphra- 
tes Valley, where Adam and Eve cel- 
ebrated it. Adam came home one 
night, after cracking nuts, and said 
"Hallo, Eve"!, and Eve immediately 
picked up a gate and hung it on 
him. The story was carried to the 
British Empire, where the name was 
changed to Hallowe'en. The Pilgrim 
(Continued on Page 4) 
O 

STUDENT-FACULTY 

COUNCIL REVIVED 



The Student- Faculty Council, 
which was an active campus group 
during the year 1927-1928, has been 
revived this year. Some of the pre- 
vious members from the faculty have 
been reappointed, while new appoint- 
ments have been made. The entire 
faculty appointments made by Dr. 
Gossard are Dr. R. R. B'Utterwick, 
president of the council, Dr. P. A. W. 
Wallace, Dr. Paul Wagner, Prof. S. 
O. Grimm and Mme. Green. 



G-BURG "BULLETS" 
LAY LOW MYLINMEN 



L. 



V. FIGHTERS SHOW 
GREATEST PLUCK 
OF SEASON 



An inspired Lebanon Valley team 
journeyed to Gettysburg and gave 
that school the biggest surprise they 
have had this season when they com- 
pletely outplayed the "Bullets'' but 
lost 13-7 on Saturday, November 16. 

Coach Bream's team was expecting 
a comparatively easy game, figuring 
on scores of previous games, and 
when McMillan cut loose early in the 
first quarter and ran half the dis- 
tance of the field for a touchdown, it 
looked like a walkaway for Gettys- 
burg. 

With the score 6-0 against them* 
Lebanon Valley began an offensive 
that was beautiful to watch. Its 
equal had not been seen previously 
on the Gettysburg field and it com- 
pletely baffled the home team. Pa- 
trizio was the field general that mix- 
ed the plays so well that Gettysburg 
had no idea what to expect next. 

"Sweeney" Light plunged through 
the line on delayed line bucks for big 
gains and Patrizio sliced through 
tackle for gain after gain. Patrizio 
played the best game of his career 
at Lebanon Valley in this game. Aid- 
ed by Lechthaler and Kelly, who 
completely boxed the defense, Pat 
squirmed through for one first down 
after another. The Blue and White 
(Qontinued on Page 4) 
O 



KALO-DELPHIANS 
TURNMINSTRELS 

MEMBERS SHOW TALENT 
IN MUSIC AND DANCE 
FEATURES 



A most unique and interesting pro- 
gram was presented by the Kalo and 
Delphian Literary Societies on Fri- 
day evening in Kalo Hall. An excep- 
tionally large number of students and 
faculty was present, and due to the 
limited space within the hall, many 
guests were forced to observe the 
performance from the doorway and 
windows. 

The program started promptly at 
eight o'clock. A minstrel composed 
of members of both societies served 
as the major feature of the even- 
ing's entertainment. Songs and 
dance numbers were interspersed 
with clever jokes by the end-men in 
the minstrel. Trezise, Grant, Becker, 
Morris and Morgan featured in a 
novelty orchestra "stunt." 

Miss Helen Franklin performed a 
toe-dance so cleverly and gracel'ully 
that there were repeated calls for en- 
cores. She was accompanied on the 
piano by Forrest Clarke, who served 
as pianist for the entire program. 
The next presentation was the 
"Whoopee Hat Brigade," featuring 
Edgar Shroyer, William Barnes and 
(Continued on Page 3) 



fKGE TWO 



LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1929. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 . • Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene. '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

REPORT OKI AIi STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. L. Raudabush. '31 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley. "32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 Al umni Reporte r 

BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant. '31 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept. 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 



were disregarded openly — in some 
instances in the past by Senators 
themselves. Any opposition to this 
procedure by an individual was 
promptly met by the howl of "dis- 
'oyalty". H'ut we feel that this is 
lot disloyalty. It is merely loyalt\ 
lo a larger responsibility which Bu 
percedes the loyalty to the fellows. 
So we say, hats off to the fellow: 
who have the nerve to stand up in 
•he face of such narrow, nrsplacctl 
oyalty and who uphold pnd keep 
heir promises to the larger unit — 
^he college. 

Here's for a logger and better Leb- 
inon Valley! 

WHAT "Y" CONFERENCE 

DID FOR ONE SENIOR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENKE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3. 1879. 



LOYALTY TO OATHS 



The question very often arises as 
(to the degree of loyalty an individual 
owes to his associates, and that 
which he owes to the various organ 
izations and groups of which he is a 
member and with which he asso- 
ciates. 

We have a form of student gov 
eminent at Lebanon Valley. The 
Men's Senate has been elected b 
the male students to govern them 
and to thus replace the proctors who 
formerly lived in the dormitory to 
maintain order. 

At the beginning of this schoo 
year the elected Senators stood be- 
fore the student body and took a sol- 
emn oath that they would uphold the 
rules of their organization. 

To make this article specific, last 
Sunday evening in the Men's Dormi- 
tory, one of the ancient and annual 
water battles was held in the hall- 
way of the second floor. Water 
flowed by the bucketfuls, ran under 
doors and trickled down the steps. 
Common sense alone should be suffi- 
cient to indicate that such a proce- 
dure is exceedingly harmful to any 
building, especially to the plaster, 
and might result in a great deal of 
damage. Further, the dormitory 
rules of the Senate specifically state 
•that, "The throwing of water in the 
dormitory is strictly prohibited." 

A Senator, an officer in that body, 
warned the offenders, but received no 
attention. So he listed those who 
were indulging in the pastime and 
reported them for trial. What is the 
result? Those affected and others 
also charge him with disloyalty to 
his classmates and are trying to have 
him ostracized among the rest. 

Now is it not right here that the 
whole trouble (for we believe that 
we all will admit that our method 
is far from perfect) with our system 
of government lies? If an individual 
must lay aside his sworn duty to an 
organization because of so called 
"loyalty" to "the Boys", the Sena- 
torially enforced rules are absolutely 
worthless and it is vitally necessary 
for us to return to the proctors. But 
if the individual's loyalty to the 
group— in this case, to the Senate- 
surpasses that to his fellows and if 
the Senators realize this, then this 
is the better form of government. 

It has apparently been customary 
in past years for the Senate to pun- 
ish only offenders of the freshmen 
rules. As far as the major rules and 
dormitory rules were concerned, they 



It would be impossible to enumer- 
ate all the benefits which I received 
from attending the Student Confer- 
ence. I selected the group discussing 
"Building a Home" for I, like other 
girls, have the ambition to some day 
have a home of my own. The dis- 
cussion revealed to me truths which I 
! never before had an opportunity to 
learn. Ignorance is sometimes said 
I to be bliss, which may be true in some 
cases, but on this particular subject it 
is dangerous and also creates much 
disturbance in the mind of the person. 
Probably to others this discussion 
meant much, but it had a special sig- 
nificance to me because of a great 
fear or worry I suffered over one of 
these problems. 

Timidity has always been one of 
my characteristics. It seemed to me 
that the older I was getting the more 
backward I grew. It seemed to me 
las if others had some knowledge or 
secret which I did not possess. How 
to get this knowledge and what kind 
of knowledge it was I did not know. 
Being timid I naturally would shrink 
from discussing this matter with 
someone else. Sometimes by observa- 
tion or a chance remark I would come 
to a conclusion on some question that 
was of tremendous importance to me, 
but often it was not a satisfactory 
conclusion. My mother is just like 
many others and I could not go to 
her for advice and even if she could 
have given it, my timidity kept me 
from ever approaching her with the 
question. 

This conference has been a great 
strength and influence to me. In fu 
ture years it may be still more bene 
ficial. Even though I will not be here 
to enjoy it again, I am sure there will 
be many like me who will be thank- 
ful for the benefits of such a confer 
encc. It seems such an excellent 
movement, not only doing much for 
the individual hut for the school as a 
whole. 

A Senior. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



DRYS GET NEW CZAR 



| Among Our Seniors 




SAMUEL 



ZAPPIA 



A man of fire "und wie." This 
simple statement fully describes 
"Zap" and yet how much it include 
in this young man's makeup. It is 
that fiery quality that has placed Sam 
as one of the leaders of the school. 

On the football field it gives him 
the fight and determination that is 
necessary for a star player. For this 
quality "Zap" wai elected captain 
and throughout the season he has led 
his team with that never die spirit 
Win or lose he gives his all, and not 
in a selfish manner but for the team. 
As a hard tackier and a great inter 
ference runner he first attracted the 
coach's attention four years ago and 
"Zap" has played that same game 
throughout his college days. 

On the baseball field "Sam" was 
one of the mainstays of the pitching 
staff and also enjoyed the 'unique dis 
tinction for a pitcher of being the 
leading hitter on the team. For this 
reason he played outfield in every 
game he did not pitch. 

In the classroom, or wherever he 
may be, he goes about things in the 
same way. "Math" provides another 
sport for him and he battles into the 
wee hours of the night solving prob- 
lems. 

As a coach, professional ball play- 
er, or teacher he will be successful, 
for he has the spirit to win and that 
spirit will enable him to succeed. 



The "noble experiment" of Prohi- 
bition is expected to receive its acid 
test under G. Aaron Youngquist, 
new Prohibition "czar" who suc- 
ceeds Mrs. M. W. Willebrandt. He 
announces that he is "dry politically 
and personally, but not a fanatic on 
the subject". His position will be of 
especial importance because of the 
fact that it is expected that President 
Hoover will ask Congress next 
month to turn over all enforcement 
powers to the Department of Justice 
instead of the Department of the 
Treasury, as was formerly done. This 
will leave Mr. Youngquist practically 
unfettered. He is a Swede. His po- 
litical career began in 1914 s i nc c 
which date he has held several im- 
portant positions. Previous to his 
new appointment he was Attorney- 
General of Minnesota. 



SOCIALISM STRIDES 



On November 5 ended the fight 
for the office of Mayor of New York 
City. Mayor James J. Walker was 
reelected by a large majority. The 
interesting thing about this election 
to those on the L. V. campus is that 
Norman Thomas, the Socialistic can- 
didate, polled a very large vote of 
over a hundred thousand. It is hoped 
that Mr. Thomas will be on our cam- 
pus in March to address the stu- 
dents in a chapel service as one of 
the monthly Star Course speakers. 

PROTESTANT UNION 



MADELINE RIFE 



Have you ever seen Madeline 
idle. No, and it is doubtful if you 
ever will. She is one of the ideal 
cooperators on the campus. Not only 
is she willing to work for the Y. W. 
or for her society, but Madeline is 
thoroughly dependable. One won- 
ders when she finds time to do her 
school work, and yet she is found 
somewhere near the top of the sen- 
iors. 

Few students know Madeline is an 
'elocutionist and a singer of high qual- 
ity. She will prove her dramatic 
ability on Saturday evening in the 
difficult character role of the Pied 
Piper of Hamelin, when she appears 
in Clio's anniversary play, "The 
Piper." Many of the girls who were 
fortunate enough to see her as the 
horrible witch in the playlet "Hansel 
and Gretel in the Enchanted Forest," 
remember her magnificent portrayal 
of this character role. 

Madeline is versatile — one reason, 
perhaps, why she has such numerous 
demands made upon her for her serv- 
ices. However, her varied experience 
on the campus has helped her, per- 
haps, to the f'airmindedness she al- 
ways exhibits in local matters. 



very favorable since a cheap method 
of obtaining the reclaimed rubber 
used in them has been discovered and 
has thus removed the chief objec- 
tion to their use. They are advis- 
iable because they cut down noise 
and the wear is not as great as on 
cement. They have also been tried 
out for roads with great success. 
Their big advantage in this usage is 
that there is almost no skidding on 
them. 



O- 



The latest and probably the most 
significant step in church union in 
the United States occurred when the 
Congregational Ghurch and the Chris- 
tian Church united. Previously some 
churches having the same general 
plan of government united or dis- 
cussed union. This was true of our 
own church discussing union with the 
Reformed Church and the Evangel- 
ical Synod of the South. But in this 
case this is the first time that two 
churches of separate religious bodies 
have united. The new church now 
has a membership of T,8oo,ooo. 

RUBBER PAVEMENTS 

Rubber pavements are being tried 
out in various parts of France and 
England as possibilities to replace 
concrete. The latest reports are 



Y. M.— Y. W. SESSION 



The Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. 
A. held a joint session in the chapel, 
Sunday evening, November 17th, at 
5:45 P- m. 

Slides, depicting the story of the 
Holy Gril, were shown as Mr. Paul 
Evancoe read the story. These slides 
were obtained in Harrisburg. 

The Holy Gril is supposed (o have 
lu-vu the cup which caught Christ's 
blood and was purchased by Joseph 
of Arimathaea. 



PATRONIZE 
LA VIE 
ADVERTISERS 



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10 W. Main St. AnnviUy fk 



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SPECIALS 
College Seal Paper, 50c per Box 
Bridge Lamps, complete, $1.25 
Adjustable Reading Lamps, complete 
Regular Price $3.25 
NOW — $2.25 



3800 BRANCH STORES 

Handling Wear-U-Well Shoes. 
Special work on repair work for 
College Boys 



ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR, 

207 W. Main St. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 

Main Street 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

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Annvillt, Pa. 



Eyes 
Examined 
Glasses 
Repaired 

DR. H. GRUMAN, 48 N. 8th St. 
Optometrist Lebanon 




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SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



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PUBLICATION. 
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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 1929. 



PAGE THRKi. 



/il ). to Ofv^a 




"A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' " 

—JONATHAN SWIFJ 



THE BALLAD OF SIR FREDERICK MUND 

The Dean sits in her office, 

Sipping her light-pink tea: 
''O whar will I get guid Sophomore, 

To watch Violet for me?" 

Up and spak an eldern Senior, 

Sat at the Dean's richt kne: 
"Sir Frederick Mund is the best Soph, 

That ever there could be." 

jr f 

"Mak haste and tell him," said the Dean, 

"He's over at the dorm": 
"O say na sac, my madam deir, 

For I feir a deadlie storme." 

"Late, late yestreen I saw Fred Mund 

Wi Violet in his artne, 

And I feir, I feir, my deir madam, 

That she will cum to harme." 
* * * * * 

O lang, lang may Miss Violet stand 

Wi hir gold kem in hir hair, 
Waiting for hir ain deir Fred, 

For she'll sc him na mair. 

(Apologies to "Sir Patrick Spens".) 
— LVC— 

Heard on the waiter force: 

Oley: Who you taking to Clio this year? 

Eulalie: Nobody, I'm in the play. 

Paul Keene: (With a sarcastic laugh) — ."Yeah, you were in the play 
'ast year, too. 

—LVC— 

Dot Heister, at head of table-Spoon, i 
Cal.: Noun or verb? 
Wed: Imperative or interrogative? 
Dot : Exhortation. 

— LVC— 

The "prof who comes to class ten minutes late is very rare; in fact, he 
,s Ir < a class by himself.— Upsala. 

— LVC— 

HEARD ON THE SHIVELY FARM 

Mr. Shively: Well, I guess I'll go out now and water the cows. 
"Dot" Garber: Water cows! I though you milked them. 

—LVC— 

PHILOSOPHY COURSE IN THREE SENTENCES 

M The cosmos is a gigantic flywheel making io.ooo revolutions a minute. 
2 > Man is a sick fly taking a dizzy ride on it. 

3- Religion is the theory that the wheel was designed and set spinning 



to 



£>ve him a ride. 



(H. L. Mencken.) 



— LVC— 



Miss Witmer: (one of the troubled neophytes: "What will I ever 
d° if I cret thru the lesson too soon? 
Miss Sheddy: Recite your Clio part. 



DEBATING TEAMS GET 

READY FOR ACTION 

Prof. Stokes called a meeting on 
November 13 of all those interested 
in debating. Ten students were 
jpresent. There are others who are 
interested but were unable to be 



present. 



The question to be debated by 
college teams this year is "That the 
United States should withdraw from 
the Kellogg Peace Pact." Challenges 
on this question have been made by 
teams from Ursinus, Albright and 
Elizabethtown Colleges. 

Tryouts for the two mixed teams 
will be held Thursday night, Novem- 
ber 21, at seven o'clock in Room 18. 
It is desired that all those who can 
would prepare a short speech on the 
debating subject for the try-out. 
From the number, eight students 
will be selected, three for the nega- 
tive and three for the affirmative 
team, also an alternate for each. 

Professors Stokes, Wallace, Ste- 
venson and Gingrich are the faculty 
advisers. 



-O- 



CAMPUS MUSIC LOVERS 
HEAR FAMOUS ARTISTS 



The group of faculty and students 
attending the Star Concert series in 
Harrisburg were very well pleased 
iwith the second number held on 
Thursday, November 14. The con- 
cert was rather unique, being a joint 
'cello and harpsichord recital. It was 
interesting for its novelty and his- 
torical importance, as well as from a 
musical standpoint. 

The harpsichord, forerunner of the 
modern piano, was skillfully handled 
by Gregor Piatigorsky. Composi- 
tions of a light, technical nature were 
best suited to the instrument. Lewis 
Richards, 'cellist, with Valentine Pav- 
lovsky at the piano, was greatly ap- 
plauded. His selection of numbers 
proved him to be a versatile player. 
His interpretation of Mainardi's "Ital- 
ian Rhapsodie'' was the first appear- 
ance of the composition in America. 

The next concert will be given by 
the famous American tenor Edward 
Johnson, on December 11. 



o 

JUNIOR CAST START 

PLAY REHEARSALS 



As a result of the Junior Play try- 
outs, a cast which according to all 
indications will be able to do "The 
Private Secretary" justice, has been 
selected by the coach, Dr. P. A. W. 
Wallace. 

Mr. Marsland, an old Southern 
gentleman, will be played by Mr. 
Joseph Hutchinson. His nephew, 
Harry, is Mr. Russell Morgan. Mr. 
Cattermole, a gruff, old gentleman, 
delighting in tales of his youth, will 
be .Mr. Earl Wolf. His nephew, 
Douglas, is Mr. Robert Roudabash, 
who sows his wild oats. The Rever- 
end Robert Spalding, an eccentric, 
fussy gentleman, will be handled by 
|Mt. Robert Eshleman. Mr. Sidney 
Gibson, a tailor aspirins to social dis- 
tinction, will be Mr. Alexander 
Grant. Knox, the writ server, is Mr. 
Willard Trezise. Edith Marsland, 
Mr. Marsland's daughter, is Miss 
Dorothy Thompson, and her friend, 
Eva Webster, is Miss Sara Ensming- 
cr. Miss Ashford, governess of the 
girls, is Miss Caroline Fisher. Miss 
Ruth Eiller will play the role of Mrs. 
St rad, the landlady. 

The cast is already hard at work, 
expecting to produce the play early 
in December. 

O 

Perhaps the oldest player in col- 
lege football is Rassmussen of Wis- 
consin. Before the War he played a 
year at Nebraska and during the 
War he won All-Service ranking. In 
1019 he went into business but now, 
at the age of 37, is completing his 
education. He is an end. 

— Yale-Princeton Official. 



RIBBONS AND SOCKS 

FOR MEMORY BOOKS 



The campus is now back to normal 
since last Friday, when the fresh- 
man girls put away their green hair 
ribbons and the nineteenth century 
brown ribbed stockings that they 
have been wearing during freshman 
girls' regulations. 

As it is traditional for the sopho- 
more girls to decide on the much de- 
spised accessories which every frosh 
girl must wear, this year the same 
meeting was held and the green hair 
ribbon, the brown stockings, wearing 
of no jewelry and the use of no cos- 
metics was the verdict. 

It seemed at first to the freshman 
girls as if a plague had descended up- 
on them. To be forced to wear 
brown stockings and green hair rib- 
bons to meals, classes and the post 
seemed too disgraceful. Each girl 
girl submitted as gracefully as she 
could to the ordeal and it has become 
a common sight to see a co-ed walk- 
ing across the campus wearing the 
brown ribbed stockings and her 
"crowning glory'' adorned with a 
brilliant green ribbon. 

However, the time at last ar- 
rived when articles could be dis- 
carded. The rules are "off," but for 
many, more rules are "on" as a result 
of not closely adhering to the deci- 
sion laid down by the sophomores. 

O 



CLIO PUTS FINAL 

TOUCHES ON PLAY 
(Continued from Page 1) 



Gladys Knaub, the President, and the 
following committees: 

Program — Esther Angstadt, Anne 
Gordon, Ann Augusta Eshenshade 
and Marie Ehrgott. 

Stage — Josephine Yake, Eulalie 
Mortin. Meredith Rice, Alary Mc- 
Curdy, Elizabeth Flook, and Dorothy 
Garber. 

Costume — Irene Peter, Mary Ellen 
Witmer, Betty Black, Margaret Smy- 
ser, Miriam Silvius, and Mildred 
Saylor. 

Invitations — Olive Morrow, Mar- 
tha Daley, and Dorothy Hyland. 

Refreshments — Ruth Parnell, Mary 
Rank, Helen Hain, and Naomi 
'Shively. 

Seating — Corrinne Dyne and Helen 
Copenhaver. 

Decoration — Mildred Myers, Dol- 
ores Gregory, Ruth Armacast, and 
Ruth Coble. 

Music: Leah Miller and Hilda 
Hess. 



KALO-DELPHIANS 

TURN MINSTRELS 
(Continued from Page 1) 



"Sonny" Russel. This was a trilogy 
of monologues presented in English 
American Flapper, and Italian style. 
They also displayed their ability as 
musicians by obliging the guests with 
request numbers. 

Dorothy Hafer and Edgar Shroyer 
entertaned by presenting a dialogue 
in song. This was really a conversa- 
tion utilizing the theme verses of 
popular songs for subject matter. 
"Dot" forced a big laugh when she 
sang "WJien I Strolled the Lane To- 
gether.'' Gladys Hershey and Har- 
riet Miiler rendered a dance duet 
which w r as very well executed ami 
delighted the audience. "Babe" Ear- 
ley and Forrest Clarke put on an 
original "song and dance" of their 
own. "Babe's" tap-dancing was ex- 
ceptional and consequently an en- 
core was called for. 
noiiBrrnolfii to jhJ b bn£ bsriafioia 

the entire program was a huge 

^success and proved to the spectators 
that there is some real talent on our 
campus. It is to be hoped that more 
programs of similar nature will be 
given throughout the year. 



PRINTING 



luoi euountlnoo js 
r 111M gaiM .89gnq 
odi *io ^'dgirl 
When you want work 
of the better kind see 



HIESTER— The Printer 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
A Mesage of Love to the Folks 
at Homo 

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•20 Cumberland Stroot 
Lebanon, Pa. 



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OF QUALITY 

Annville - pa. 



F. W. GERBERICH'S STORE 



FRESH GROCERIES, 
SODAS and ICE CREAM 



29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 



Shaeffer's Lifetime Pens — 

NONE BETTER ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 

AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

tt a -p pr>j The Gift Store of Lebanon 

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THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL 
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This Week — 40 Cents 
Regular — 50 Cents 

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A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

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Lebanon, Pa. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1929. 



DELEGATE SENT TO 

BUCKNELL CONFAB 

(Continued from Page i) 



r.y," and "Practical Application of 
the Honor System." The L. V. rep- 
resentative reports that much was 
made of the latter, and suggestions 
which were made during a discussion 
which followed showed surprising 
advancement in some colleges. 

"The Relation of Faculty Admin- 
istration to Student Government" 
was discussed by the Dean of Swarth- 
more College. The Dean of the 
Pennsylvania College for Women 
spoke on "Responsibility and the 
Spirit of Student Government Lead- 
ership." The speeches were very in- 
teresting and beneficial because they 
were approached by women who are 
in a position to see two sides to 
every question. One of the Bucknell 
professors made another able talk on 
"Seeing Beyond College Walls." 

These titles give just a hint of 
what thoughts and problems were ap- 
proached and a bit of information 
regarding the advantages offered by 
such a conference. Plans were laid 
for a similar one next year at the 
New Jersey College for Women. 

Banquets, teas, and. other forms of 
entertainment were interspersed the 
conference, so that the week-end was 
a continuous round of delightful sur- 
prises. Miss Miller speakers very 
highly of the hospitable reception 
and entertainment which she enjoyed 
at Bucknell. 

Miss Miller substituted at the con 
ference for Miss Madeline Rife, orig 
inally elected as L. V. representative. 
Miss Rife, because of intensive final 
practices for "The Piper," to be given 
Saturday evening, found it imposs 
ible to attend, 



o — — 

HUMORIST PLEASES 

IN CONCERT SERIES 
(Continued from Page 1) 



fathers brought the custom to Amer 
ica with them. 

As after dinner speaking is becom 
] ing the thing in America, he gave a 
few points and illustrated. Before he 
began, he . said that the Greeks had 
, discovered oratory as well as the res 
taurant and candy kitchen. The first 
requisite in oratory was a good voice, 
the next essential was to (i) use the 
index finger gesture, (2) watch-chain 
gesture, and (3) one step forward and 
arms extended gesture. By all means, 
tun your fingers through your hair 
occasionally, he added. When quot 
ing, be sure and tell your audience 
Senator Borah says there are more 
hoboes riding on trains than freight 
cars; Thomas Jefferson said, "Better 
an upper on the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road than a lower on the Reading." 
Lady Godiva said, after a hard day's 
ride, "I'm drawing near my close." 

Mingled with his jokes were small 
bits of truth which every one would 
do well to observe. Laugh as much 
as possible and get the maximum en- 
joyment out of everything. Laugh- 
ing is good for your physical well- 
being. It aids digestion and above 
all eliminates the need of medicine. 
Laugh for your liver. 

Another truth he emphasized was 
to find the job your liked best and 
derived the most pleasure from. Don't 
consider material gain. Cultivate 
high courage in the face of adversity, 
for it is not the way you win or lose, 
but how you play the game that is 
going to count. 

Mr. Pugh's "Movie Scene" before 
"talkies" came in, his sneezing reci- 
tation, and his interview with the 
ticket agent to explain the difference 
between a higher and lower berth, 
why the lower is higher and the 
higher is lower, etc., aptly brought 
out his unusual ability and versa- 
tility. 



G-BURG "BULLETS" 

LAY LOW MYLINMEN 

(Continued from Page 1) 

marched the length of the field to 
the four yard line. A fumble lost ten 
yards for Lebanon Valley and then 
Gettysburg held for downs. 

The second quarter Lebanon Val- 
ley began another offensive. A pass 
to Cunjack over the goal line was 
unsuccessful because one of the Get- 
tysburg backs knocked Cunjack 
over as he was trying to receive the 
ball. The half ended, Gettysburg 6, 
Lebanon Valley o. 

The third quarter Lebanon Valley 
kicked to Gettysburg and then held 
them for downs. Cramer punted to 
Albright who ran it back twenty 
yards. Lebanon Valley began an- 
other drive to the goal line which 
could not be denied. "Gus" Daub 
carried it across for a touchdown. A 
pass, Albright to Daub, added the 
extra point. 

1 Gettysburg got their final touch- 
down by a break in the game. Cra- 
mer punted to the Lebanon Valley 
five yard line. Lebanon Valley tried 
two line bucks and then Daub was 
elected to punt. The pass from cen- 
ter was a little high and Daub fum- 
bled but recovered a yard or two 
in front of the goal line. Albright 
punted on the next play, the kick 
netting fourteen yards. McMillan 
advanced the ball to the one yard 
line where Lebanon Valley held for 
three downs. On the fourth down 
Koontz scored and McMillan added 
the extra point with a place kick. 

The Lebanon Valley line deserves 
much credit for completely outplay- 
ing the Gettysburg line. They open- 
Jed big holes for the backs to go 
through and also played a great de- 
fensive game. 



ALUMNAE RETURN 

HOME FROM AFRICA 

(Continued from Page 1) 



L. V. 
Cunjack 
Barolet 
Wood 
Reese 
Lechthaler 
Warner 
Orsino 
Patrizio 
Zappia 
Albright 
Light 

Touchdowns: 
Koontz. Point 
Daub, McMillan. 



GETTYSBURG 
L. E. Cramer 
L. T. Leese 
L. G. Murgard 
C. Santine 
R. G. Herzlick 
R. T. Tussey 
R. E. Cuban 
O. B. McClay 
L. H. B. McMillan 
R. H. B. Anglemoyer 
F. B. Koontz 
McMillan, Daub, 
after touchdown 
Subs: L. V.— I-Iel 
ler for Orsino, Daub for Patrizio, 
Kelly for Warner, Stewart for Zap- 
pia. Referee — Houtz, Penn State. 
Umpire — Schmidt, Bucknell. Head 
Linesman — O'Brien, Swarthmore 
Field' Judge — Rankin, Brown. 



O- 



READERS PRESENT 

FAVORITE POETS 

The Reader's Club met at the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Wallace, Wednes- 
day evening, November 20, in a most 
interesting meeting. The subject of 
the program was "Modern Poetry." 
Each person told who his or her 
favorite poet was. Quite an array of 
poets was presented and it showed 
the various kinds of works that the 
public knows today. 

Ruth Cooper read some snatches 
of anonymous poetry from her treas- 
ured scrap book. Each one was a 
beautiful piece of work. 

Billie Coleman gave some excellent 
examples of child poetry of modern 
(writers. Her poems were beautiful 
both in content and word coloring. 
Walter Krumbeigle read several of 
his favorite poems of the modern day 
which were also very good examples 
of tthe contemporary trend of poetry. 
As a feature of the evening, Eliza- 
beth LeFevre and Edward Schellen- 
burg recited some of the poetry 
which they themselves had composed. 
Each one gave several of their best 
attempts and the applause which 
they received indicated the senti- 
/ments which the members of the club 
felt toward the poets of their own 
class. 



missionary alumnae, has recently re- 
turned from Africa upon her second 
furlough. 

Miss Bachman was graduated from 
Lebanon High School in 1915 and 
from Lebanon Valley in 1919. She 
held a teaching position in George- 
town, Delaware, for the years 1919- 
21. Following this she studied at the 
Moody Bible Institute for two years. 
Then in '23 she went as an educa- 
tional missionary to West Africa. Ija 
1926 she came home on her first fur- 
lough. She has quite an exciting 
story to tell about the shipwreck on 
her way home. She escaped unin- 
jured, however. 

Miss Bachman returned to her 
home in Lebanon this past Decem- 
ber. Her furlough, however, began 
in May, but she spent four months 
touring the Holy Land. 

Miss Bachman has much to tell 
everyone about her work and experi- 
ences in Africa. She teaches in the 
largest school for girls in Africa and 
doubtlessly has had very much in- 
fluence on the educating of the Af- 
rican girls. 

— O 

VARSITY MEN ON 

MARINE ELEVEN 

(Continued from Page 1) 



guard, who learned the game while a 
student at the University of Mary- 
land, and Charley Gann, formerly 
from the University of Missouri, who 
is making his debut with the Marines 
this year. 

Dave O'Neill, captain and fullback, 
received his early training at Anna- 
polis. 

Louis Plain, a tackier, was a Penn 
State toter before joining the sea- 
soldiers. Snively, a tackier, formerly 
played at Graceland College in Iowa. 
Truckenmiller, another tackle, played 
at Cornell College, at Mt. Vernon, 
Iowa, and Swearingen, guard, played 
his freshman year at the University 
of Nebraska. 

The various positions in military 
rank range from buck private to first 
lieutenant, but on the squad no dis- 
tinction is made. 

Last year the Marines defeated 
Lebanon Valley by the score of 32 to 
0. This year our eleven hope to re- 
deem themselves, and the school, and 
is out for blood. 



RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

OUR AGENTS AT 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

FINKELSTEIN 

Cleaners & Dyers 



MISS COOPER LEADS 

DEVOTIONAL SERVICE 



CHEFS 

HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



The weekly prayer meeting was 
held on Tuesday evening in Kalo 
Hall, with Miss Ruth Cooper leading. 
r l he meeting was opened with the 
/singing of a hymn after which John 
Snyder led the group in prayer. 

Ruth Cooper discussed the force, 
strength, and power of Christ. Vari- 
ous persons read scripture passages 
on the subject. Following this sen- 
tence prayers were offered. The 
'meeting was closed with the singing 
of a hymn. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR XMAS 



Books — Fountain Pens — Books — 
Writing Paper — Books — Book- 
ends — Diaries — . Books — Mottoes 
and then again Books, Books, Books. 

All can be bought at 



BOLLMANS 



33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 

P. S. — Don't wait too long for 
those lovely Christmas Cards 
36 for $i.oo 



D. RUSSO 

LOOK lo a w prices LOOK 

Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels ^ 

Men's Half Soles ^ t 

Ladies Half Soles & 

Rubber Heels $| . 

Ladis Half Soles 80c. With ' 

T °P Life $i.o 5 

Ladies Rubber Heels 

35c Top Lift 2Sc 

9 E MAIN ST. 
CENTRAL SHOE REPAIRING 
SHOP 



D. L SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 

ANNVILLE. PA. 




I 




can remember when 

"I can remember when the 
Ladies (God bless them!) 
used to wear hoop-skirts to 
the Class 'Hop'; 

"when nearly every male student 
wore sideburns and carried a cane; 

"when the annual Sleigh Ride was 
the big Whoopee of the year!" 

H ^ x 

Yes, and we can remember when 
College Men used to work labori- 
ously and lengthily over letters to 
folks back home! ... But that has 
been eliminated by the Telephone. 

There's one near you, and 
Home is only a few moments 
away! Just for fun . . . call 
Home tonight. 






XJpPERCLASSMEN! ARE 
yOUR FACES BLANKS? 
IF NOT, SEE HARPEL 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



DO NOT FORGET IN 
YOUR XMAS BUDGET 
"L. V. IN AFRICA" 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1929 



NO. 9 



L Y SWAPS VICTORY FROM 

DNCLESAM'S LEATHERNECKS 

Z APPIA'S CREW SWEEPS SEA BOYS OFF FIELD 
IN BRILLIANT FINALE OF 
GRIDIRO N SEASON 



ALUMNUS, WESTERN 

SEEDSMAN, DIES 



Lebanon Valley brought to a glor- 
ious close its football season on Sat- 
urday, November 23, when they 
trounced the Quantico Marines 19 to 
7 at Island Park, Harrisburg. 

The Blue and White sank the Ma- 
rines with an aerial attack in the first 
half. The opening kickoff was fum 
bled by a Marine back and Lebanon 
Valley opened immediately with for- 
ward passes; the second one, Al- 
bright to Thrush, netted a touch- 
down. 

Patrizio directed the team in great 
style, mixing passes with line plunges 
and laterals. Pat gave another ex- 
hibition of 'brilliant running and in- 
tercepted a pass in the second quar- 
ter to place the ball in Marine terri- 
tory. 

L. V. Scores 

A succession of line bucks with 
Sweeney Light carrying the brunt of 
the attack and lateral passes, Zappia 
to Albright, placed the ball in scor- 
ing position. Light cracked the cen- 
ter of the line and scored from the 
twelve yard line. Joe Wood's place- 
ment was perfect for the extra point. 

A minute before the first halt end 
ed Albright passed to Heller who 
made a beautiful catch and raced for 
a touchdown, pass and run netting 
about forty yards. The try for point 
was blocked. 

The Marines came back the second 
half and played Lebanon Valley on 
even terms. Early in the fourth pe 



iod Dashell, backfield ace of the Ma- 
nes, slipped through tackle for a 
run of fifty-five yards and a touch- 
down. Pierce drop-kicked for the ex- 
tra point. 

Seniors Play Finale 
Three seniors played in their last 
game for their Anna Mater. They 
were Cunjack, end, and Captain Zap- 
pia and Albright, halfbacks. Each 
one of these lads played a great game 
in their final college contest. 

Bartolet played a great game at 
tackle and Lechthaler was equally 
great on the other side of the line. 
These two boys pleased the suppor- 
ers from their home towns by their 
brilliant exhibitions on the line. 

Lebanon Valley looks forward to a 
highly successful season next year 
or only three players will be lost by 
graduation and, furthermore, the 
schedule is considerably lighter. The 
showing this year was wonderful, ai 
though only two games were won 
Four others, however, were closely 
contested so that the team deserved a 

(Contiiiued on Page 4) 

ECONOMICS°SUBJECT 
OF CHAPEL SPEAKER 



COLLEGE CHURCH 

DEDICATES CHIMES 



The new Tower Chimes of the 
College Church were dedicated Sun- 
day afternoon, November 24, in an 
inspiring and appropriate service 
The first peal of the Chimes was 
heard at three-forty-five o'clock, when 
they played a short prelude. They 
also furnished the music for the of- 
fertory, and were heard in a concert 
after the service 

The church choir contributed much 
to the beauty of the service, the 
c horuses being especially well ren 
dered. Such compositions as Cos 
ta's "J Will Extol Thee," Wagner's 
"Pilgrim's Chorus," and Beethoven' 
"Hallelujah" (from "Mount o 
Olives") were rendered. 

The devotional part was led by 
Rev - U. E. Apple, President of the 
Ministerial Association. Rev. J. O 
J° n es, pastor of the church, gave a 
s P } endid talk on the "Church and the 
^ rt of Music," tracing the develop 
1Jle nt of music in connection will 
c hurch worship from the early ag< 
t( ' the present. The actual dedication 
Wa s done by Rev. Jones, who dedi 
Cate d each chime separately with 
prayer, 

The chimes are a gift to th 
church and community from Mr. an 



th 



rs - C. M. Coover in memory of 
e ' r parents. 



Henry L. Alusser, an alumnus ol 
884, called the "father of the west- 
111 vegetable industry" and consid- 
red a contemporary of Luther Bur- 
ank, died at his home in Los All- 
eles, California, on October _'0. 
J\!ot only the prominent business 
men respected Mr. Alusser as a 
worthy associate, but the Chinese 
market gardeners trusted him as an 
honorable iriend. through the 
Chinese triends he first learned many 
nteresting and valuable strains which 
originated as sports in local gardens. 

"iceberg" lettuce was hrst intro- 
duced to the Los Angeles market by 
Mr. Alusser. ibis strain originated 
in Italy and in 1901 was imported by 
Air. ALusser into this country. 

Born in Alarietta, Penna., sixty- 
otir years ago, Air. Alusser received 
his B. S. degree from Lebanon Val- 
ley at the age of nineteen. Five years 
ago he retired from the seed busi- 
ness, being president at that time ol 
the Aggeler and Alusser Seed Com- 
pany. 

FILIPINODESCRIBES 
NATIYE PROGRESS 

BUSINESS STUDENTS 
HEAR ADDRESS ON 
FOREIGN STATUS 



DR. WARD CHALLENGES 
FOR WORTHIER 
EXISTENCE 



Dr. Harry F. Ward, Professor at 
Union Theological Seminary, the 
second chapel speaker secured by the 
Star Course Committee, brought a 
new line of thought to our campus in 
his address on "Plunderers, Parasites 
Producers" on Friday morning. 

The speaker showed his interes 
and understanding of economic life 
but in presenting it to us, did not fai 
to remember that college students 
have a meagre background, and th 
majority of them a poor sense of ap 
preciation along that line. Dr. Ward 
realized that and very skillfully took 
a student viewpoint wherever possi 
ble, and combined student and eco 
nomic affairs in a manner new to us 

"What are you going to do wit 
your college education?" and "How 
are you going to do it?" were th 
challenging questions with which Dr 
Ward first arrested students' atten 
tion. He assumed that most students 
as is natural, will be using their col 
lege education as a means to earn 
living. In connection with the sec 
ond question, he explained that there 
are three ways by which man ha 
been accustomed to gain his livel 
hood, namely: Taking it from othe 
people— plundering; getting it from 
other people— as parasites; earning 
— iby contributing something useful to 
society. It is the problem of presen' 
(Continued on Page 4) 



CLIO ADDS NEW PAGE TO MORE 

THAN HALFCENTORY OF HISTORY 

FIFTY-NINTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATED WITH 
DRAMATIC PRODUCTION AND RECEPTION 
TO G UESTS 



The Clionian Literary Society add- 
ed another achievement to its history 
with the successful celebration of its 
Fifty-ninth Anniversary on Saturday, 
November 23rd, at 8 P. AI. The so- 
ciety presented for the entertainmem 
01 its guests "The Piper," a play by 
Josephine Preston Peabody, and the 
grand finale of the evening came in 
the reception of an unusual type 
held in the gymnasium immediately 
after the play. 

The program in the chapel openea 
with the Invocation by Aiiss Aiyra 
Sheaffer, '27, the anniversary presi- 
dent of Clio's Fifty-sixth celebra- 
tion. A group of songs by Aliss Leah 
Miller, accompanied by Aiiss Alildrea 
Myers, gave an artistic touch to the 
preliminary program. The anniver- 
sary president of Clio, Aiiss Gladys 
Knaub, welcomed the society's guests 
to both the play and the reception 
which were to follow. 

The Play 
"The Piper", given under the di- 



The Hon. Dr. Camilo Osias, Resi 
dent Commissioner of the Philippine 
Islands, gave a thirty-minute talk to 
•the students in the Political Science 
class, and to those students and pro- 
fessors who are interested in the 
jforeign relations of the United States 
He spoke on the political operations 
of the Federal Government in the 
Philippines. Dr. Osias is a member 
of the United Brethren Church and is 
a Mason, although the latter fact di 
minishes his populariy with the 
Roman Catholic factions of tthe Is 
lands. He was a former student in 
this country and has been in the 
teaching profession. 

Dr. Osias presented a graphic pic- 
ture of the evolution of the political 
development of his "patria" ' as he 
termed his country. He described the 
(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

FORMER L. V. PREX 

HAS 83RD BIRTHDAY 



PRESIDENT IS HOST 
TO COLLEGE FACULTY 



INDIAN ECHO INN 
SCENE OF GOSSARD 
BANQUET 



IS 



Dr. Delong, who was President of 
Lebanon Valley College from 1876 to 
1887, recently celebrated his eighty- 
third birthday in Los Angeles, Cal. 
Dr. DeLong, it will be noted, was at 
the college helm during the early 
years, when the institution rose from 
an academy to a college. He is one 
of the early pioneers of the school. 
There is no doubt but that the pres- 
ent success of the school is due in 
great part to the progress for which 
This leader of almost half a century 
ago stood. 

The present faculty and student 
body congratulate Dr. DeLong upon 
his recent birthday. 



President and Airs. Gossard enter 
tained the faculty members and theii 
wives at a dinner held on Tuesday 
evening, November 26. Turkey and 
all of the dishes savoring of the sea 
son comprised the menu of the ban 
quet, which was served at the Indian 
Echo Cave Inn. 

Before the dinner, the guests were 
given the unique surprise of being 
shown through the natural Indian 
Echo Cave. Under the direction oi 
two competent guides, the forty-two 
people present spent an hour view 
ing the objects of interest. A bou 
quct of sixty-two chrysanthemums, 
gift of the faculty members, was pre 
sented to Dr. Gossard, it being the 
occasion of his sixty-second birth 
day. 

O 

MISS JOHNSON IS 

HOSTESS TO CO-EDS 



On Thursday afternoon, November 
_>i, Aliss Stella Johnson, head of the 
French department and advisor of 
the Y. W. C. A., gave a delightful 
party to the members of the Y. W 
cabinet and the officers of the Del 
phian and Clionian Literary Societie 
at her apartment on East Mai 
street. Several tables of bridge were 
played during the afternoon. Tea was 
served to about twenty-five guest 



rection of Miss Mary K. Wallace, 
proved a surprise to those who an- > 
ticipated a dramatization of the old 
story of the Hamelin rats. The plot 
is based on the driving of the rats 
from Hamelin by the piper and the 
refusal of the town fathers to pay 
the thousands guilders. However, 
Miss Peabody, in her version, shows 
us a piper who is not a mere charla- 
tan, as is the piper in Browning's 
delightful narrative poem. He has 
the mind of a poet; he is a worshiper 
of nature. With the piper are asso- 
ciated Alichael-the- Sword-Eater who 
falls in love with Barbara, the burgo- 
meister's daughter, and Cheat-The- 
Dcvil, a good-natured fellow who 
takes all the blame for everybody's 
misdeeds. Later, when the piper 
charms all the children by his tunes 
and they follow him inside the 'Hol- 
low Hill', he does this not for re- 
venge on the parents, but rather to 
save these children from the lust lor 
money which arflicts their parents, 
tie wishes, instead, to teach these 
children to love nature — the beauty 
of the waterfall, the song of the 
dark. Of all the Hamelin mothers 
only one, Veronika, "the foreign wo- 
man", has the courage to seek for her 
son, the crippled Jan. She meets the 
piper at the Cross- ways and pleads 
in vain for the return of Jan. It is 
the wayside crucifix, or the "Lonely 
(Man", that finally influences the piper 
to return Jan to his courageous 
mother and eventually all the 
Hamelin children to their parents. 

Aiiss Aladeline Rife, in the role of 
the Piper, put into her characteriza- 

( Continued on Pag« 4) 
O 

FROSH HOLD SOPHS 

TO ZERO BATTLE 



In a gruelling contest on Alonday 
afternoon, November 25, the sophs 
and frosh struggled through a listless 
game to a scoreless tie on the college 
athletic field. 

So far as the skirmish was con- 
cerned, the frosh showed a trifle bit 
more power than the sophs. Both 
Sides played hard, limiting their plays 
mostly to line plunges and forward 
passes. The ball changed hands fre- 
quently, except at certain times of 
the game when the frosh drove deep 
into the sophs territory, only to be 
held for downs. 

During the whole game only a few 
sensational runs stood out as the in- 
teresting points of the game. 
, Gibble and Shortlidge were con- 
stant ground gainers and menaces to 
the frosh, while English and Taronis 



Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace, also an ad 
visor of the Y. W., was a guest at proved to be the source of trouble 
the party. for the sophs. 



i*\GE TWO 



LA VIP. C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1929 



ESTABLISHED 1926 

A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 . . Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene, '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

bEPOETOKIAL STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner, '30 

Ruth Shroyer. '32. , 

Kussell Morgan, '31 

llbt. L. Eaudabush. '31 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '3.0 Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess '30 .. Clionian 

Hilda Buckle -. '32'... Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 .... Alumni Reporter 

. BUSINESS STAPF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant, '31 

. . . . . Assistant Business Manager 
William J. Myers. '30 .......... 

Circulation Manager 

FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace. English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States., 

Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



WHAT IS LIFE WORTH 



Thanksgiving at Lebanon Valley 
seems to be somewhat neglected. VV-e 
have no formal service which might 
be an expression of the students' 
feelings on such occasions. Howi 
ever, this absence of outward expres- 
sion should not necessarily indicate 
a lack of feeling. To enumerate the 
jnany things for which- v/6, as stu- 
dents of Lebanon Valley, should be 
thankful would be foolish. Certainly 
we have no reasons to enter into the 
hours of despair which men are ex- 
periencing at the collapse of the 
stock market. 

Recently a man drove his car up to 
the jail at Great Falls, Montana 
and left a. short note for the sheriff 
returned to his car and killed himself 
Among other ideas found in that 
farewell letter there are outstanding 
"I am one of those millions that are 
of no use to anybody, never get any 
place, never accomplish anything 
never get a chance af anything 
.worth while, and if 1 did' I wouldn't 
have sense enough to take it." "A 
worthless self" is all he had left. 

It is true that we all have our 
moods of despair but in view of the 
many things for which we can be 
thankful, can we justify such 
thoughts? The lowliest, most insig 
nificant of us has his place- which will 
be left vacant when; he or she goes 
out of this world. Perhaps we have 
only a broad smile on which our 
acquaintances have come to depend. 
However triffling that may seem, is 
it not in our place to smile and be 
thankful for the opportunity to 
smile? 

Loneliness is a keynote struck in 
all notes left by suicide. Bait that 
feature should not be a- despairing 
one. W!e must realize the fact that 
our existence condemns us to a cer- 
tain amount of loneliness -and it is up 
to us to school ourselves in the school 
of independence. 

Let's be thankful to our Creator 
if our thankfulness is limited to a 
smile of a friend. 



the hope of being cured of their ail- 
ments. 

No. one seems to know how it 
started. Father Patrick Power has 
been buried for sixty years and was 
little known at the time of his death. 
Stories sprang up that the grass on 
his grave remained green while that 
on others withered; that candles con- 
tinued to burn when others Syere 
blown out. 

A little over three weeks ago a 
tabloid newspaper ran an account of 
these strange occurrences. ' Some 
people came to visit the grave; cures 
were reported and the rush began. 
People came in crowds, all hoping, 
believing and praying to be 'made 
whole by some miraacle. Cripples, 
the blind, and diseased all came or 
were brought to the shrine, full of 
hope. They rubbed the affected 
parts with earth from the grave while 
the police held back the crowds. If a 
cure was not effected there, they went 
to a little chapel neanby and prayed. 
Altho only one authenticated cure is 
known, the pilgrims still press about 
the shrine to the number of fifty 
thousand a day. 



L 



Among Our Seniors 



VOLCANIC STEAM HEATING 



"Use what you have when you have 
it," is the motto of a hotel proprietor 
in Hawaii. One of them is planning 
to build a large new hotel near the 
Kilauea Volcano crater which will be 
heated entirely by volcanic steam. 
Four wells will be drilled into the 
hot rocks beneath and steam from 
them will be piped throughout the 
hotel. Further uses of volcanoes 
have come to light. In Iceland, Ja- 
pan and New Zealand volcanoes are 
used to provide steam for heating 
homes and for use in steam laundries. 
In California and in Italy the steam 
is used to generate electric power. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



NEW ENGLAND SHRINE 

Unprecedented in > the history of 
Massachusetts is the wave of relig- 
ious hysteria now passing over it 
which has brought eight!" hundred 
thousand people in three weeks to 
the grave of an unknown priest in 



ENGLAND'S DEFIANT POET 



1 Rumor has it that Great Britain 
Will hot have a poet-laureate after 
Robert Bridges passes on. Mr. Mac- 
Donald will probably not appoint a 
successor for two reasons. First, Mr. 
Bridges has not written about the 
births, deaths, marriages and other 
details of the royal family as he was 
expected to do in the discharge of 
lis duty. The other and perhaps the 
main reason is that his latest work 
'The Testament of Beauty," will open 
K-ar in the ranks of English Litera- 
:ure. The poem has "passages that 
^re as good as Tennyson at his best 
^nd others that are as obscure as 
Browning at his worst." The "casus 
oelli" is his use of simplified spelling 
throughout. At places this usage 
sticks out like a sore thumb. The 
Daily Express remarks, "Has Dr. 
pridges written a masterpiece or 
ptarted a crusade? It is for him to 
explain." 




HOMER J. ALLWEIN 



"Behold the man!" Let us intro- 
duce to you the "crack" business stu 
dent of the Senior class — none other 
than Homer himself. Not Homer 
Feep, the model husband, altho we 
suspect that he might be that some 
day, but our own Homer, who has 
made himself liked and respected on 
our campus by three years of asso- 
ciation with us. 

Homer is primarily a student. Ex- 
amine the marks of the business stu- 
dents and you will find that it is he 
whose name heads the list. Not only 
is he learning the theory of business, 
but last year he put the theory into 
practise in the capacity of Circulation 
Manager of the Class' Annual and 
served very efficiently in that office. 

Allwein is also an athlete. He 
played reserve football his two first 
years at Lebanon Valley and is keen- 
ly interested in all sports. In his 
fC-hevy" he follows the teams 
through all their victories and de- 
feats. 

Above all, he is a gentleman and 
is liked and admired by everyone who 
knows him. This liking is by no 
means restricted to members of his 
own sex, but extends also to the 
girls, with whom he is deservedly 
popular.- 

To sum up, we might use the ex- 
pression that has been applied to 
Homer at various times on the cam- 
pus: "A prince of a man". 



HOTTEST SPOT ON EARTH 



Dr. Reginald Daly, Professor of 
Geology at Harvard, is making a 
i;tudy of the interior of the earth by 
jin analysis of the waves produced by 
Earthquakes. As a result of this 
otudy, he has presented a paper to 
he Seismological Society of Amcr- 
ca in which he published his opin- 
ions. He thinks that the center of 
the earth is white hot at an average 
temperature of more than ninety 
thousand degrees F. 

Enclosing this core is a shell of 
tron resembling meteoric iron. Then 
come zones of basalt and granite, and 
(fovering. all is a terrestial crust thirty 
jniles thick. With all these layers 
there should be plenty of protec- 
tion from the heat, if Dr. Daly is 
correct in his assumption. How- 
ever, the evangelist's idea that Hell 
js "A place thirty miles straight 
down" is evidently in for revision. 



CHILD MARRIAGES 



: A recent law in India penalizing 
bhild marriages will, it is hoped, put 
fen end to one of that country's most 
serious social evils. The new law 
lays a penalty upon all marriages In 
Which a girl is under fourteen or the 
boy under sixteen. Formerly it was 
very common for men of forty or 
(even more to marry girls of twelve 
who were betrothed to them at the 
jbirth of the girl. The older people 
bf the country and the Conservatives 
paturally oppose the law as one that 
transgresses their rights. The Mos- 
lems and Hindus claim it interferes 
with their religious freedom. How- 
fever, the reformers and the younger 
generation believe that this step will 
"make for a healthier, happier India." 
O 




GLADYS KNAUB 



Here's to Gladys! Mistress of cer- 
emonies at the fifty-ninth anniver- 
sary of Clio! 

One might think that the anniver- 
sary presidency begins and ends with 
standing before the beautiful red vel- 
vet curtain and giving the tradition- 
al speech of welcome to the society's 
guests. When some ambitious presi- 
dent will pen his or her auto- 
biography, w r e'll read the true story 
of their worries and nightmares. The 
president plays a difficult role, un- 
doubtedly the most difficult in the 
whole cast of society participants, 

Gladys has proved to us on many 
previous occasions her executive ca- 
pacity. Her management of Clio's 
birthday celebration again proved her 
to be the able and splendid leader. 

There is a paradoxical element in' 
the college career of Gladys. We all 
recall the Biblical exhortation of 
working six days and resting the sev- 
enth. This year Gladys works only 
five days and rests two — for when 
"Jack" comes each Saturday morn- 
ing the books are "cracked" shut with 
a bang. Last year it was even worse 
— "Jack" and Gladys seemed eternal- 
ly together. In spite of this time- 
consuming, extra-curricular diversion, 
Gladys has always remained the "A" 
student of her class. She has either 
mastered Douglas' sixty odd rules on 
"How to Study" or "Jack" is a 
powerful inspiration. Perhaps Gladys 
will solve this problem for us. 

O 

STUDENTS SHOWN 

"DRY" INFLUENCE 



ALUMNI ANNOUNCE 

BIRTH OF DAUGHTER 



' Mr. and Mrs. David Shroyer have 
recently announced the birth of a 
daughter, Anne Elizabeth. Mrs. 
Shroyer before her marriage was 
Miss Frances Long, who was grad- 
uated from L. V. in '28. Mr. 
Shroyer is a graduate of the class 
of '29 and is now connected with the 
Millard Stone Company. 



PATRONIZE 
LA VIE 
ADVERTISERS 



■ Miss Ruth Lockman, representing 
■the International Student Prohibi- 
tion Movement, addressed the stu- 
dent body on Wednesday morning in 
a short but able discourse on the 
present status of affairs in regard to 
prohibition. The various statistics 
which she quoted emphasized the 
alarmingly great sum of money ex- 
pended each year in this country for 
alcoholic beverages in contrast with 
the expenditures on important items, 
j The main topic of Miss Lockman's 
talk was that contrary to their own 
ideas students have a very great 
share and influence in the whole 
question of prohibition and especially 
in its success or failure. Whether or 
not students will be interested in it. 
will determine largely whether or 
not future civilization will profit by 
our eighteenth amendment. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEYE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St 



Annvill e> $> k 



CHRISTMAS SPECIALS 



w% off on all Felt goods, inclu#,J 
PENNANTS. BANNERS, PILLOW 
TOPS, Etc. 
15% off on all College Jewelry 
This sale includes Eraterity Pins and 
L. V. C. — Except Crown Set 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



For 

QUALITY PLUS 

in 

Material and Workmanship 
Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

ANNVILLE SHOEMAN 
207 W. Main 



For Quality 



Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 



Main Street 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



PRINTING 



When you want work 
of the better kind see 

HIESTER-The Printer 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA 
LOGUES, STATION- 
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err* 



ETC. 



ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 

ANNVILLE P A< 



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"House of Better Values" 
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328 W. Main St. Phone 6R3 



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LA VIE l OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1929 



PAGE THRKfc 



M COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES' '' 

—JONATHAN SWIF1 



Dr. Butter wick: Mr. Greiner, j^ou tell us what is love? 

Greiner: I can't define love. 

Dr. Butterwick: Then descrihe it. 

Greiner: It's a tender emotion. 

Dr. Butterwick: Can there he love without a manifestation of love? 
Greiner: I — I really don't know. 

—LVC— 

READING BETWEEN THE LINES? 
Heard in French 36— 

Dot. Boyer (translating): Two hours for a share! 
Miss Johnson: You mean "for a shave". 

(It's easy for some folks to mistake "lubber" for lover". 
Dot (translating) : .. the hig — a — a, lover .. .. 
Miss Johnson: Yes, but better than that — "the big stiff". 
That's all right, Dot — we all need help from the side lines. 

— LVC— 

THE WEAKER SEX 

Johnny Hughes falls in the dining-room beside Bernita Strebig's chair. 

"Barnie" to Bernita: So Johnny "fell" for you. H-m-m. 
Bernita (innocently) : He couldn't help it. 

— LVC— 

BARGAIN HUNTER IS GOOD BAIT 

The blue ribbon must be awarded to Mary Stager as the most cunning 
bargain hunter. Mary recently purchased a bath spray for $6.00 in order to 
get a tooth brush free. (Great idea Mary; all the millionaires began like 
that.) 

— LVC— 

THE ABSENT-MINDED STUDE! 

"Al" Slichter: What day is this? 
Olive Morrow: Half past eleven. 

— LVC— 

Exam Question: State the number of the last amendment added to 
the U. S. Constitution, and tell for what the amendment provides. 

Answer in one Blue Book: The Nineteenth Amendment; Equal Suf- 
frage — the women have a right to suffer as well as the men. 

— LVC— 

"JIGGER BOARD DIRT" 

Miss Weigle: Were you ever in trouble before? 

A Certain Frosh: Well, the librarian fined me two cents! 

— LVC— 

Franklin Miller: I developed these hig muscles by working in a boiler 
f actory this summer. 

Innocent Mary: Oh, you wonderful man! And what did you boil? 

— LVC— 

It may take only two alumni to have a reunion at some schools. But 

^ e are beating even that record. This and that alumnUS returns each week- 
end • • 



- "^""iig v-vtn uiai icwiu. x ins cliiu uidi diuuiuu J ituini.i cav.ii ni.>.» 

a nd stages single-handed successful reunions with the alumnAE of the 
lire. 

—LVC— 

Barnie: I think I'll open up an office when I graduate. 
^ e n: I'll probably turn out to be a janitor myself. 

— LVC— 

u ady S Knaub: Ho vv do you like that phonograph record? 
Mary Rupp: It's much better than the one you had last year. 

— LVC— 

Bud" Hoy to his sister: I never have time to do my homework. 
Betty; You would if you wouldn't do so much roadwork. 



KEENE IS ELECTED 

ANNIVERSARY PREX 



On Friday night, November 22, 
after its usual literary meeting I'hilo 
held its election for Anniversary 
President, with Calvin Keene receiv- 
ing the position. The nominations for 
tli is office were made from the floor 
by juniors. Luther Rearich, John 
Snyder and C. Keene were the nom- 
inees. 

Th,e previous Friday, at its busi- 
ness meeting, Philo elected its sec- 
ond term offices. They are: Presi- 
dent, William Myers; Vice-President, 
Fred Christman; Recording Secre- 
tary, Robert Rawhauser; Correspond- 
ing Secretary, Paul Keene; Critic. 
Calvin Keene; Chaplain, Goodman; 
Chairman of Executive Committee, 
Paul Evancoe; Pianist, Robert Eshle- 
inan; Editor, "Schell, and Janitors, 
Naughtel, Newcomer and Knisely. 
These officers were installed Novem- 
ber 22. 

After the installation of Philo's 
second term officers, an entertaining 
program was given. "The 'Punkin' 
Rollers" was the subject of a speech 
given by John Hughes. As usual, 
Hughes had his hearers in an uproar 
of laughter while he related his "ex- 
periences." 

Lindsay pleased the society with 
two solos. Knisely spoke interest- 
ingly on "My Conception of College 
Life." "Living Thoughts" was pre- 
sented by Schell. Calvn Keene criti- 
cised the evening's program. 

O 

DELPHIANS ENACT 

PURITAN WEDDING 

Delphian Literary Society held 
their regular meeting, November 22. 
The devotional services were opened 
with a duet by Augusta Trolete and 
Marion Kruger, accompanied by Ar- 
lene Heckrotte, the society singing 
the chorus. 

"How We Came to Enjoy Thanks- 
giving," by Ruth Cooper, brought out 
an interesting fact. It was through 
the perseverance of Mrs. Hale, a New 
England woman who wrote to presi- 
dents and governors for over a pe- 
riod of ten years, that America came 
to have a fixed day for thank offer- 
ings, to be known as Thanksgiving 
Day. 

"Thanks Be to God," and "Our 
Yesterdays" were sung by Hester 
Thompson, accompanied by Effie 
LeVan. 

Poems which aroused the appetite 
and overworked the salivary glands 
were read by Elizabeth Lefever. 

The last number on the program 
was a parody of the "Wedding Day 
of Miles Standish." The sketch, read 
by Bernita Strebig, opened with the 
entrance of the Great High Priest, 
making profuse obeisances; next trip- 
ped in P'riscilla, the Puritan maiden, 
followed by the Elder and Magis- 
trate, who were stern of counte- 
nance. The bridegroom approached 
with a self-conscious air. After the 
wedding ceremony, there appeared an 
armour-clad ghost. Then the bride- 
groom brought in his White Bull, 
and helping Priscilla to the animal's 
back, took her away. 

O 

"Y" DISCUSSES WORLD 

LEAGUE QUESTION 



The secretary of the Department 
of the World League in Washington, 
D. C, Mr. Burnett, spoke to the stu- 
dents in a joint Y. W. C. A .and Y. 
M. C. A. meeting on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 24, in North Hall Parlor at 6:00 
m. 

The purpose of Mr. Burnett was to 
show to the young men and women 
the greatest social problem all stu- 
dents have to face. The idea of this 
World League is to give the student 
a wholesome and intelligent attitude 
toward the problem of alcoholic 
prohibition. 



KALO FEATURES A 

FEAST OF SPEECHES 



Kalo held its customary literary 
session on Friday evening, November 
22. The session proper was preceded 
by a business meeting. New .mem- 
bers were pledged and the Society dis- 
cussed its plans for the future. ' ' 

The program was especially adapt- 
ed to this season of the year, being 
presented as a Thanksgiving dinner. 
Zechnian inaugurated the banquet by 
giving "Grace." "Oyster cocktail," as 
presented by Noll, was a spicy appe 
tizer and whetted the appetites of th< 
banqueters. "Turkey" was served 
by Prof. Stevenson, and without tur- 
key there is no Thanksgiving. Prof 
Stevenson spoke to the Society on the 
history of Thanksgiving. He read se- 
lected quotations from a history 
written by W r illiam Bradford, second 
governor by the Plymouth Colony. 

"Side Dishes" by Shenk. was a 
resume of current events which took 
place recently. They were of nation- 
al interest and served to vary the uro- 
gram. "Cafe Noir" as brewed by 
Becker, the acting critic, proved to be 
a strong draught of Weehawkett elo- 
quence. The program was well pre- 
pared and the individual speakers, 
Prof. Stevenson in particular, are to 
be commended on the. splendid man- 
ner in which they presented their 
assignments. ******** 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings, 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
Clocks 

LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 
VICTOR RADIOS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 
SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, P*. 



TWO ORGANIZATIONS 

FORM CAMPUS MERGER 



The Ministerium and the Student 
Volunteers had a joint meeting on 
Thursday, November 28, at which it 
was decided to form a merger of "the 
two organizations. The members 
decided to call the new organization 
the Life Work Recruits. This organ- 
ization -will meet every two weeks 
and discuss problems, relative to 
their < work. ■ . ,. 

The Lite Work Recruits, • believing 
that -it fits in with '.their work, offer 
to conduct services in churches when- 
ever they are invited to do so. 

— _q — — 

KEENE PRESIDES AT 

"Y" WAFFLE FEAST 



Hats off . to "Cal" Keene! Oucc 
again be has demonstrated his busi- 
ness ability — this time the business of 
managing a waffle iron. For it was 
in the capacity of "head waffle- 
maker" that Cal succeeded in de- 
lighting the members of both Y.. M. 
and Y. W. C. A. cabinets, Mrs. 
Green, and our visitor, Miss Lock- 
man, on Tuesday evening in North 
Hall. Although it was a "dutch 
treat" everyone went away with "that 
satisfied feeling." m tmm 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
A Mesage of Love to the Folk* 
i at Home 

ULRICHS STUDIO 

Sib GamberUad Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



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Annville 



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OF QUALITY 



Pa. 



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AN EVERYDAY NECESSITY FOR 
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t t a -q ¥>¥7T >o The Gift Store of Lebanon 
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THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL 

FORTUNE HAS FAVORED US 
We now have the agency for 
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OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



CLOTHING F QUALITY 

J S BASEHORE 



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E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE C OLLEG1ENNE. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5,. 1929 



CLIO ADDS NEW PAGE 

TO LENGTHY HISTORY 
(Continued from Page 1) 



DEBATERS PREPARE 

FOR SEASON'S WORK 



tion the fantastic imagination not un- 
necessary for his part. The dynamic, 
assertive, personality which the piper 

shows to the townspeople and the ab- 1 tentatively for the affirmative team 



Renewed interest in debating was 
shown by the try-outs which were 
hold on Thursday, November 21. 

The Kellogg Peace Pact was the 
subject discussed by the students who 
ppeared for tryout. Those selected 



solute sincerity of the youthful ideal- 
ist as he struggles with himself be- 



are Misses Shroyer and Hess and 
Messrs. Rugh and Heilman. The 



fore the "Lonely Man" of tthe Cross- tentat i ve negatives are Misses Daley 
ways are perhaps contradictory char- and Franklin and Messrs. Hallman 



and Etter. 

Challenges for debates have been 
received from Ursinus, Albright, Gen- 
eva, Juniata, and Elizabethtown Col- 
leges. Hilda Hess was elected to ar- 
range a schedule for the debates. 

V. SWAPS VICTORY 

FROM U. S. MARINES 

(Continued from Page i) 



FILIPINO DESCRIBES 

NATIVE PROGRESS 

i Continued from Page i) 



better fate. 

L. V. 
Thrush 
Bartolet 



u. s. 


MARINES 


L.E. 


Harrington 


L.T. 


Plain 


L.G. 


Standley 


C. 


Sutton 


R.G. 


Crowe 


R.T. 


Cummings 


R.E. 


Glick 


QvB 


Duncan 


L.H.B. 


O'Neil 


R.H.B. 


Long 


F.B. 


Billingsley 



conquest of the Islands by Spain and 
the subsequent actions of the United 
States, after defeating Spain in the 
Spanish-American War. Immediately 
following the war, the United 
States established a military govern- 
ment which was soon replaced by a 
civil regime headed by William How- 
ard Taf't, later to become the Chief 
Executive of this country. 

During Harding's administration, 
Dr. Osias visited this country as a 
member of a Filipine commission. At 
this conference, the commission was 
assured that the Filipine government 
would obtain their independence when 
they were in a position to adequately 
govern themselves. Dr. Osias declares 
that his government is now strong 
enough to govern the Islands. His ar- 
guments on this point were well 
founded with the exception of the 
commanding position which Japan, 
her neighbor, has come to occupy in 
the nations of the world. Dr. Osias' 



acteristics to find in one person; how- 
ever,. Miss Rife gave an interpreta- 
tion which at all times was convinc- 
ing and gave evidence of a fine dra- 
matic technique. 

Veronika, "the foreign woman", 
played by Miss Anne Gordon, was 
the one tragic role in the play. Not 
only was Miss Gordon's personality 
well adapted for the part, but the 
pathetic element she put into her act- 
ing made the picture of Veronika 
both a pitiful and a beautiful one. 

Miss Lolita Mummert and Miss 
Anne Kiehl as Michael-The-Sword- 
Eater and Barbara respectively, rep- 
resented the love theme in the story. 
Miss Mummert as the handsome J Wood 
Michael proved a very persuasive I Reese 
lover. ' Miss Kiehl, who made her Lechthaler 
first appearance in campus dra-j Kelly 
matics, enacted her role with the love J Oirsino 
fervor requisite for the part. Patrizio 
The greatest credit is probably due I Albright 
to the directress, Miss Wallace, in I Zappia 
the ensemble scenes. One of these I Light 

scenes inside the 'Hollow Hill', 1 Subs — L V.: Heller for Orsino;. 
where the piper -has assembled all the Daub f or Light, Nye for Albright, the sincere gratitude of the Filipine 
children of Hamelin, not only proved Cun jack for Thrush, Kazlusky for People to the United States ^ overn 
good entertainment, but had that deft r' Albright for Daub, Stone for ment - The llttle P atnot then declarea 
touch of good stagecraft which made Bartol ' et> Light {or Nye, Warner for that our organization was a great one 
it an impressive scene. The other ^ Stewart tor Zappia J but that he had more faith m the 



I COLLEGE CALENDAR 

* Friday, December 6th— Society 
■ meetings. 

j Sunday, December 8th— Y. W. C. 
I A., North Hall Parlor, 
j Tuesday, December ioth— Student 
I Prayer Meeting, in Chapel. 
; Wednesday, December nth — 
Junior Class Play, 8 I'. M. 



very interesting topic for debate. 

Dr. Osias quoted McKinley as say- 
ing that "The Philippine Islands are 
ours, not to exploit, but to develop." 
The Commissioner, who is a mem- 
ber of the United States Congress, 
spiced his talk with numerous inter- 
esting anecdotes relating to the activ- 
ities of the Congress. He expressed 



Touch- 
ensemble scenes of the townspeople j downs: Thrush, Light, Heller, Dash- 
of Hamelin showed excellent group I Point after touchdown: Wood, 



long dreamed of Filipino government 



acting, which was only made more 
attractive and outstanding by the col- 
orful costuming of the Hamelin citi- 
zens. 

The Cast 

The cast of the play included: 
The Piper, Madeline Rife; Michael- 
Tbe-iSword-Eater, Lolita Mummert; 
Cheat-The-Devil, Irene Peter; Strol- 
lers, Olive Morrow, Lenora Bendei, 
and Miriam Silvius. 

Men and Women of Hamelin: 
JacobuSj, the Burgomeister, Mary 
McCurdy ; Kurt, the Syndic, Fae 



Pierce. Referee, Price, Swarthmore. 
Umpire, Green, Penn. Head lines- 
man, Greer, Catholic University. 

O 

ECONOMICS SUBJECT 

OF CHAPEL SPEAKEE 

(Continued from Page i) 



day students to decide into which 
category they will go. 

The "plundering" system of gain- 
ing a living has prevailed down 



/ 

A 

V 



Bachman; Peter, the Cobbler, Ann through the ages, but is becoming m- 
Augusta Esbenshade; Hans, the creasingly disreputable. The para 
Butcher, • Hiilda Hess; Axel, tht sitic method decreases the real work 
Smith, Mary Ann Rupp; Martin, the ers' efficiency and their opportumty 
Watch, Dorothy Hyland; Peter, the to earn a living, and therefore would 
Sacristan, Helen Kauffman; Anselm, I become ineffectual. He concluded 
a young Priest, Mary Ellen Witmer; that the best vocational choice would 
Old Claus, Mae Fauth; Town Crier, be one in which producing service 
Eulalie Morton, Veronika, the wife of could render good to a community. 
Kurt, Anne Gordon; Barbara, daugh- College folks should plan to add 
ter of Jacobus, Anne Kiehl; Wife of creatively, whether in professional or 
Hans, the Butcher, Meredith Rice; economic life. He set as a standard | _ 
Wife of Axel, the Smith, Margaret Lf value for college trained people the 
Smyser; Wife of Martin, the Butcher, statement "finding LIFE by spend- 
Corinne Dyne; Old Ursula, Josephine ing it in the service of mankind." 
Yake. During the periods after chapel Dr 

Nuns and Priests: (Nuns), Helen Ward addressed students who were 
Copenhaver, Mary Rank, Martha especially interested in economic and 
Daley, Naomi Shively; (Priests), Mil- international questions. He pointed 
dred Myers, Ruth Armacost, Marcel- out that World Peace could come 
la Greiner, Helen Groh. about only after economic affairs 

Children: Jan, Alcesta Slichter; we re straightened out within and be- 
Trude, Marion May; Hansel, Robert tween countries, after America shall 
Grimm; Use, Helen Kreider; Rudi, have assumed he equality, commer 
Leverde Shutter. Other Children: daily speaking, of other nations, and 
Elva Gertrude Jones, Tony Wallace, after business affairs shall be con- 
Junior Grimm, Bobby Jones, Cath- ducted openly and honestly. There- 
erine Kreider, Junior Miller, Richard fore, instead of placing the task of 
Grimm, Louise Witmeyer, Alice outlawry of war into the hands of the 
Richie, and Eleanor Bowman. 1 church, this man feels that the eco 

Clio Reception . nomic world is the only place where 

^ . , I u can rightly be approached. 

After the successful presentation of ' 



NO 
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USED 




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the play, the greater part of the audi- 
ence adjourned to the Alumni Gym- 



CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



While the orchestra composed of 



nasium for sociolizing and refresh- campus talent played, old acquaint- 
ments. The gymnasium had been ances were renewed and new friend- 
transformed into a gay rendezvous by ships made among alumni and pres- 
the aid of vari-colored bridge lamps, ent students. Every guest in 
bright pillows and comfortable gymnasium did his and her bit to 
chairs. Clio girls served ice cream, make this one of the gayest anniver- 
cake and punch. | sary receptions ever held. 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



For a nice line of useful Christmas 
Gifts at reasonable prices there is no 
better place than 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



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Men's Half Soles 

& Heeels $1.50 

Men's Half Soles $i <OQ 

Ladies Half Soles & 

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Ladis Half Soles 80c. With 

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PARENTS . . . seldom 
complain about this 

JV^ost pleasure costs money. 

Some pleasures cost so far 
out of proportion to their 
worth, that it's no wonder 
Dads and Mothers sometimes 
say "go easy" to sons away at college. 

You know that. 

There's one College Pleasure, how- 
ever, about the cost of which parents 
seldom complain. 

Because it's a pleasure in which 

they share. 

We refer to the popular custom of 
telephoning home regularly. 

All you have to do is give the 
operator your home telephone num- 
ber, say that you want to 
reverse the charge and let Dad 
take care of the rest! 

Just for fun . . . call Home 
tonight! 




c 




DELPHIAN OPERETTA 
IN ENGLE HALL 
DECEMBER 18 




Wit (Eolkflienne 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



ANNUAL CHRISTMAS 
"Y" PAGEANT ON 
DECEMBER 19 



VOLUME V 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1929. 



No. 10. 



NYLIN'S HOPES FOR 
STAR QUINTET GOOD 

VETS AND TRYOUTS 
FORM PROMISING 
SQUAD 



Prospects for a successful basket- 
ball season look favorable for the 
local team this year. Only two vet- 
erans were lost by graduation last 
year, Stanley Piela, captain and star 
forward, and Fritz Miller, guard. 

Coach Mylin has a wealth of new 
material who will battle to fill the 
vacant positions, while the other pos- 
itions will probably be filled by the 
same athletes as last year. 

Captain Albright, who was one of 
the mainstays of the team last year, 
will lead the court five from a guard 
position. "Sweeney" Light, another 
veteran from last season, will pair 
with Albright at guard. These 
two lads are great offensive men, as 
well as defensive, and their presence 
in the lineup will give Lebanon Val- 
ley a strong five-man offense. 

Heller, lanky pivot man of last sea- 
son, is a fixture at center. "Cal" im- 
proved in each game last year and 
finished the season as one of the lead- 
ing scorers. He will be the leading 
threat for the Blue and White this 
year. 

Stewart and Ulrich are veterans at 
the forward positions and will prob- 
ably hold down these positions in the 
coming campaign. Both lads are 
(Continued on Page 4) 

O 

RECRUITS HEAR TALK 
ON FOREIGN MISSIONS 



Mrs. J. Hal Smith, a former mis- 
sionary, 'addressed tthe members of 
the Life Recruit Association in North 
Hall last Thursday evening. 

Her speech consisted of a series 
°f incidents in her life that happened 
While she was in the mission field. 
She stressed that Life Work Re- 
cruits need not go to the mission 
fr e ld, but, instead, they can help by 
doing their part here at home. She 
believed it would be a wonderful 
thing for a life work recruit to sup- 
P° r t one missionary in the foreign 
^ e 'd. She also related how the 
^hristian Church is doing more to 

re ak down race prejudices than any 
°ther organization. Two other or- 
ganizations that are doing good work 

lon g this line are the Y. M. C. A. 

nd Y. W. C. A. 

^he trend at present is to combine 
t | le various Protestant denomina- 
tes in the mission fields. Much has 
gently been done along that line in 

e Philippines. When a person be- 
^ 0r nes a Christian in the mission 
e '^> he doesn't take time to read 
tllUs ty books concerning the differ- 
ent denominations in order to decide 
^°ich one to join. She believes in 

ya 'ty to a denomination, but in a 
J^ Uc h greater loyalty to God. She be- 

^ Ves that the time is fast coming 
t ^ hen the native church will replace 

e missionaries. It is not a ques- 
l °i of "Where I can fill a need, but 
Wher e can I fill the greatest need." 



ALUMNI BEGIN LIFE 

WORK IN AFRICA 



Mr. and Mrs. Lester Leach, the 
former an L. V. graduate, left this 
fall for the mission field in Africa. 
Mr. Leach is a graduate of Shenan- 
doah Collegiate Institute, in the class 
of '21 and a graduate of Lebanon Val- 
ley College in the class of '25. He 
served as the pastor of Franklin 
United Brethren Church and Princi- 
pal of the Upper Tract School, Up- 
per Tract, West Virginia, following 
his graduation from this school. Mrs. 
Leach, formerly Miss Susanna Ran- 
dall, also attended school here for a 
time. Now both of them are serving 
as missionaries in Rhodafunk, Africa. 

Mr. Lloyd Bowman is another one 
Of L. V.'s alumni who is serving in 
a foreign field. Mr. Bowman was 
graduated from the Halifax High 
School in 1916 and from Lebanon 
Valley in '26. Upon his graduation 
here he took work in the Princeton 
Theological Seminary. He is now 
head of the Manual Training Depart- 
ment in the Albert Academy, West 
Africa. Mr. Bowman, however, is 
Serving in that capacity only until 
•the regular head, who is now on a 
leave of absence, returns. After that 
Mr. Bowman will be stationed else- 
where. 

O 



XMAS PAGEANT HAS 
CANTATA SETTING 



TENTATIVE DATE FOR 
PRODUCTION IS 
DECEMBER 19 



The Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 
pre giving as their annual Christmas 
pageant, "The Heavenly Host," prob- 
ably December 19th. 

The pageant is something entirely 
new, being a cantata-pageant with 
just enough speaking to bring unity 
into the production. The cantata is 
rather unusual in that it is the first 
time that a thing of its kind has been 
undertaken by the Y. W. C. A. and 
Y. M. C. A. It has several vocar 
solos and organ numbers. Mrs. Ben- 
der has consented to assume charge 
of the music and, for this reason 
alone, it is certain to prove a suc- 
cess. 

Anne Gordon, as the representa- 
tive of Y. W. C. A., will direct the 
cantata with the help of one member 
of the Y. M. C. A. who has not been 
selected as yet. 

An interesting fact to note is that 
California was the nearest place from 
which the books could be obtained. 
The music is of a very high class 
type and promises to be very worth 
while. There is only a short time 
remaining in which to practice for 
this cantata, and as the books have 
just arrived, much intensive work 
must be put on it for a successful 
performance. However, very cap- 
able leaders have it in hand and it 
will, no doubt, be a very pleasant 
and worthwhile surprise to the many 
who see it. 



[ARE YOU A SPIRITUALIST?) 

I 



! 

I You may not be one of those 
{ who "fall" for tthe occult. How- 
I ever, you will be one to rise to 
I 



peaks of laughter, provoked by the 



I antics of one superstitious Miss 
I Ashford, a co-partner of "The 
jj Private Secretary," who will 
I make her appearance on 



campus January 11. 



KING OF ENGLAND 
HONORS REY SUMNER 



FORMER STUDENT GETS 
HIGHEST ENGLISH 
TITLE 



By Joe Rettew 

A cablegram across the Ocean, 
despatched by the King of England 
in June 1927, came to A. T. Sumner, 
a former ex-student of Lebanon Val- 
ley College, as a great surprise. This 
cablegram informed Rev. Sumner 
that he was among the honorary 
members meritoriously entitled to 
one of England's highest titles. With 
a heart full of gladness he proceeded 
to London, and there giving his grat- 
itude in appreciation of this unique 
privilege, rather the rare opportun- 
ity, he said: "I am grateful for this 
degree of M.B.E. (Member of the 
British Empire) being conferred 
upon me. I do appreciate it. Still, 
I feel in my mind that I owe my 
present greatness to Lebanon Valley 
College in Annville, Pa." 

In response to this address, The 
English Director of Education of 
Sierra Leone, remarked: "I wish I 
could send all the youths of Africa to 
Lebanon Valley College, in order to 
be so moulded." 

Rev. Sumner is Acting Director of 
Education of Sierra Leone at the 
present time and has accomplished 
great things for the advance of his 
native people. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Friday, Dec. 13 — Philo-Clio Joint 
session at eight o'clock. 

Sunday, Dec. 15 — Y. W. evemr 
service. 

Monday, Dec. i(5 — Students' Reci- 
tal in Engle Hall. 
I Tuesday, Dec. 17 — Student Pray- 
J ermeeting. 

j Wednesday, Dec. 18 — Xmas ban- 

| quet and Delphian Operetta. 

I Thursday, Dec. 19 — "Y" Cantata j 

in chapel. 
I Saturday, Dec. 21, 12 o'clock! 
I noon — Christmas vacation be- I 

I Monday, Jan. 6, 8 A. M.— Vaca- S 
S tion ends. j 



FILIPINO CONGRESSMAN 

WAS CHAPEL GUEST 



Dr. Camilo Osias, Resident Com 
missioner of the Philippine Islands, 
and member of Congress, spoke in 
chapel on Thursday morning as the 
'third Star Course speaker. Dr. Osias 
proved to be a dynamic speaker. His 
talk was interspersed with numerous 
humorous anecdotes which kept the 
students in a receptive frame of 
mind. 

He spoke of the economic, politi- 
cal and moral conditions of his na- 
tive land. His primary purpose was 
to create a popular sentiment which 
will, in time, insure Philippine inde- 
pendence. Following the chapel exer- 
cises, Dr. Osias spoke to the stu- 
dents in the Political Science and 
Economics Departments. His per- 
sonality and keen intellect were ob- 
served to even better advantage on 
the latter occasions. 

Dr. Osias spoke to the students for 
thirty minutes and 'the balance of the 
time was devoted to a period of open 
discussion, in which he answered 
questions which were asked by the 
faculty and students. 

It is to be hoped that more speak- 
ers of Dr. Osias' calibre may be se- 
cured for the chapel programs. He 
is by far the best equipped of any 
who have spoken to the students this 



year. 



-O- 



FOREIGN MISSIONS 
SPEAKER AT CHAPEL 



MRS. J. HAL SMITH 
ADVISES FUTURE 
MISSIONARIES 



Mrs. J. Hal Smith, Special Sup- 
port Secretary of the Missionary 
Board of the U. B. Church, from 
Dayton, Ohio, with a background of 
(a number of years in actual mission- 
ary service in Africa and extensive 
travel in all mission fields of the de- 
nomination, including the Orient, 
brought to this campus several spe- 
cial messages and many warm and 
friendly greetings, together with the 
invaluble advice to prospective mis- 
sionaries which only one who has 
had experience can give. Her ra- 
diant personality made many new and 
lasting contacts during the few days 
which she spent here. 

On Friday morning Mrs. Smith 
presented the Bible to the student 
body in such a unique light that it 
undoubtedly will remain in their 
minds as one of the most arresting 
chapel talks of the year. She drew a 
splendid parallel between the Bible 
as a letter of Love from God to us 
individually, and a human love-letter. 
The application was so clearly a 
true one that no one could have 
doubted the validity of her state- 
ments had they never thought about 
the subject before. The conviction 
with which Mrs. Smith spoke im- 
pressed one with a strength and 
force which are the result of a close 
fellowship with the Divine. 



CHEMISTS INSPECT 
LINOLEMCOMPANY 

MANUFACTURING 
OF PRODUCT OBSERVED 
BY CLUB 



In keeping with their program of 
the year, the Chemistry Club, headed 
Iby Dr. Bender, visited the Armstrong 
Cork Company of Lancaster on Fri- 
day afternoon. Eighteen students 
comprised the party wheh was shown 
through the entire plant by two 
1 guides, given a lecture on interior 
decorating with regard to floor cover- 
ing, and taken on an inspection tour 
through the Administration Building 
of the company. The entire trip was 
a very instructive and fascinating ex- 
perience. 

Not only were the guides and 
other employees most courteous and 
obliging, but the trip was planned 
and scheduled so as to run smoothly 
during the entire afternoon. On ar- 
riving at the plant, the club was 
divided into two parties which, under 
the direction of two guides, began 
the tour, not before signing a book 
which made the company irrespon- 
sible for any injury which might be 
sustained. 

The guides explained the method 
of manufacturing from the importa- 
tion of the raw materials to the fin- 
ished product. Cork from Spain 
pasted to burlap from Scotland with 

a linseed oil mixture and rosin from 
South and North America are the es- 
sential ingredients. Embellishments 
are very cleverly applied by means of 
printing machines that paint brilliant 
(Continued on Pa*« 4) 
O 

Y. W. CREATES NEW 

CABINET OFFICES 



The main purpose of the Y. W. C. 
A. association meeting held in North 
Hall parlor, Wednesday afternoon, 
December 5, was to vote on an 
amendment to the constitution, pro- 
viding for the addition of two mem- 
bers to the cabinet. The new offices 
to be created are custodian of prop- 
erties and devotional chairman. The 
amendment was unanimously accept- 
ed by the association, the vote having 
been taken by ballot. 

The President, Ruth Cooper, gave 
a report on plans for the social serv- 
ice work for the Christmas season. 
A committee composed of Helen 
Hain, Queba Nye, Naomi Shively, 
and Ruth Coble has begun investi- 
gations as to what family in the town 
is most in need of and most worthy 
of a "Merry Christmas." All mem- 
bers of the Y. W. and Y. M. are 
urged to enter into the spirit of the 
season, and although provision is 
made in the budgets of the two asso- 
ciations to cover the expense of the 
"party", personal gifts will be gladly 
accepted. 

At the close of the meeting, Mrs. J. 
Hal Smith gave a short talk to the 
girls on the subject of love, defining 
it as "the atmosphere in which God 
works." 



*>KGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1929. 



%u Hie (Kolie^iemw 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students oi' Lebanon 
"Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 . . Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene. '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

KEPOETOEIAL STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Russell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. L. Raudabush. '31 •• « 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A. Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley. '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes. '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 Alumni Reporter 



BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant. '31 .. 

Assistant Business Manager 

William J. Myers. '30 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



TOLERANCE 



Tolerance, like money, is something 
which we all need and of which most 
of us have very little. There are all 
kinds of prejudices, religious, racial, 
social, and all degrees of each type 
Our purpose is just to discuss briefly 
itwo of them. 

Religious tolerance is not as crying 
a need now as it was in the Middle 
Ages, when whole countries were laid 
waste and thousands of people killed 
and massacred because of their faith. 
Perhaps the reason for this difference 
is that we do not take our religion as 
seriously as they did theirs, but we 
still require toleration. There is cer 
tainly no reason why a Protestant 
should detest a Jew or Roman Cath 
olic or a Christian a Hindu, simply 
because of their faith. None of us 
are able to produce positive, objec 
tive proof that our beliefs are exactly 
correct, otherwise there would not be 
so many different sects of Christians 
and over 200 denominations of Pro- 
testantism alone. The chances are 
that had we been born Moslem or 
Mohammedan, we would insist that 
that religion is the only true one 
not because of any particular proof 
but simply because it would happen 
to be the religion taught us by our 
parents. Let us think twice before 
we condemn anyone for their faith 

Racial prejudice is fortunately not 
very strong on our campus, but still 
it exists and we must learn tolera- 
tion in this line. The color of the 
skin does not make anyone any more 
or less of a man. We think that 
very few of the students would feel 
that they were superior to a man 
like Dr. Osias simply because he is 
brown and not white. Christ said, 
"All men are brethren" and color does 
not make or mare character. 

Rabbie Lei F. Levinge, speaking of 
tolerance said, "In the United States 
as a whole we have passed beyond 
tolerance; we are well on our way 
to equality. Our great instrument 
toward that purpose is understanding 
which is bringing us to recognize our 
neighbor, not by his label of creed 
or race but for his true worth as a 
man and an American". We hope that 
Mr. Levinge is right. 

O 

PLAYING THE GAME 



In a co-ed school such as ours 
where the number is not large, we 
are all responsible to our neighbors 
for our actions. What kind of per- 



sons compose our student body will 
depend on the standards we, as stu- 
dents, set for ourselves. As an ad- 
vocate of better school morale, La 
Vie presents this editorial for the, 
benefit of several of our number who 
do not measure up to the standards 
we like to think we constantly up- 
hold. 

The question of dress, being a uni- 
versal one, becomes pertinent on our 
campus. We realize that the finan- 
cial circumstances of the greater 
number of us prevents our maintain- 
ing an elaborate wardrobe. On the 
other hand, when it becomes neces- 
sary for the faculty to retain certain 
persons after chapel to speak to 
Ithem about their dress, a reforma- 
tion would seem needed. The ap- 
peal is to the reason and sense of 
pride of the students. Certainly col- 
lege folks should not compel some 
one to accost them about their ap- 
pearance. The boys are not the only 
ones at fault as it is known that the 
Dean has had occasion to speak to 
several girls. 

We do not intend to scorn the 
poorly clad when they have made 
an honest effort to appear neat. This 
may seem a trifling personal affair, 
)but, after all, it is these little things 
which display our ideals of honor and 
self respect. 

In the evening the girls, for the 
most part, present a change of scen- 
ery regarding their dress. However, 
such a complete change is impossible 
for the boys due to their conven- 
tional dress, but this should not pre- 
vent them from showing their respect 
for the girls with whom they dine by 
appearing in a full suit, instead of 
wearing a sweater turned wrong side 
out. 

Then, too, the young man who does 
take some interest in his appearance 
becomes a ladies' man. There is a 
golden mean in everything. Should 
this young man strive for this path 
rather than excess, we feel certain 
that his efforts would be greatly ap- 
preciated by the campus. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



SENATOR VARE OUT 



Senator Vare of Pennsylvania has 
been definitely rejected from the 
United States Senate. The battle 
waged for almost three years when 
Vare was charged with crooked cam- 
paign dealings. ; Wilson, his oppo- 
nent, did not receive enough votes to 
give him any claim to the seat, so 
that since the election Pennsylvania 
has had only one Senator. The vote 
was taken last week — 58 voted for re- 
jection; 22 voted in his favor. It 
will be the duty of 'Governor Fisher 
to appoint his successor. 





JOHN SNYDER 



Few people are born with an in- 
satiable sense of humor. John hap- 
pens to be one of those few or dare 
we say "happens" for any one so 
gifted could not be a product of 
chance. 

An ardent student of Will Rogers 
as well as Abraham Cohen, Ph.D., 
John can find the humor in a differ- 
ential equation. Then too his asso- 
ciation with a Scotch roommate pro- 
vides him with plenty of material for 
stories and jokes. 

S The manner in which he tackles 
problems is the reason for his abil- 
ity to accomplish so much. He does 
not tackle his work as if it were 
drudgery, but in a light-hearted man- 
ner that enables him to conserve his 
energy for extra-curricular activities. 

Yes, John is one of our foremost 
extra-curricular men, for he handles 
the management of the La Vie, which 
is in itself quite a task. He is a 
member of the Men's Senate, the Star 
Course Committee and other equally 
important committees and is one of 
the leaders in his literary society. 
Maybe you think this requires all his 
time and attention? What a mistake! 
This lad is present at every social 
function of the school and appears at 
each one with a different girl. 
WHAT A MAN! 



GRACE E. KEENER 



Few people have realized the pos- 
sibilities of Grace until this year. Did 

you know that Grace was a public 
speaker of no small ability? Recall 
her speech on Faculty-Student rela- 
tions before the student body at the 
"Y" Conference. Grace has ideas and 
she can express them convincingly. 
Those who frequently come in con- 
tact with her learn this quickly. To 
the ordinary observe Grace seems 
quite shy and reticent. As a conse- 
quence one must KNOIW her thor- 
oughly to appreciate. 

Another proof that Grace does not 
flaunt her ability is the fact that she 
was not appointed to La Vie staff 
until her last year at college. Wheth- 
er it be a major or a senior assign- 
ment she is working on, the best of 
her capability is put into it. And she 
is dependable!!! This is the queen 
of all virtues in a reporter. 

One finds Grace among the deserv- 
ing select student when good grades 
are given. One also finds her in the 
cage scrimmage now that basketball 
practice has started. 
There is only one fault we hold 
against Grace. She has hidden her 
"light under a bushel" and it is not 
until the last lap of her college ca- 
reer that her merits are discovered. 



PLANS LAUNCHED 

FOR XMAS FEAST 



FILIPINO INDEPENDENCE 



In line with the recent appearance 
on our campus of the Hon. Camilo 
Osias, member of the U. S. Congress 
who is fighting for the independence 
of his "patria," the Philippines, it is 
interesting to note that last Saturday 
Representative Strong of Kansas, for- 
merly opposed to their independence, 
took the floor to announce that he 
was in favor of bidding the Islands 
"Good bye and God speed". He ex- 
plained his stand by saying that they 
were a liability to the United States, 
and since the people themselves de- 
sired freedom, he was in favor of 
giving it to them. Both of the Resi- 
dent Commissioners, Pedro Guevana 
and Mr. Osias, were present and ask- 
ed the House to take favorable action 
on any measure for independence. 



The Xmas dinner this year will be 
in every respect a student affair — 
student toast-masters, student speak 
ers and student management. 

The dinner will be held in the reg- 
ular dining rooms and will be in 
charge of the W. S. G. A. and Men's 
Senate. Plans are already being 
made to make it a merry event. 

The following are the committees 
appointed to take charge of the din 
ner: 

Decoration — Hilda Hess, chair- 
man; Elizabeth Flook, Skey Wise, 
George Nye, Ed. Hertzler and Ike 
Grant. 

Seating — Fae Bachman, chairman; 
Ann Kiehl, Dot Thompson, Warren 
Burtner, and Joe Hutchison. 

Program — Dusty Rhoads, chair- 
man; Mary Buffington, Phil Barnes, 
Dorothy Heister, and John Morris. 

o 

DR. WIDDOES MEETS 

INFORMALLY WITH "Y" 

Dr. H. W. Waddoes, a missionary 
>who has seen service in the Philip- 
pine Islands met with the Y. M. and 
Y. W. C. A. cabinets on Friday 
evening in an informal gathering. 
This permitted a wide range in sub- 
jects for discussion. Many questions 
on life, customs, and conditions, both 
educational and governmental, in the 
Philippines were asked by students 
and discussed frankly. The great ex- 
perience which Dr. Widdoes has had 



there enabled him to give all the de- 
sired information and many interest- 
ing side-lights. The Cabinets were 
indeed fortunate in being able to en- 
joy the privilege of such a discussion 
with one who is outstanding in his 
work and achievement. 



CAGE SEASON SHOWS 

PROMISE FOR CO-EDs 

With the Thanksgiving vacation 
over and the 1929 football season 
part of history, basketball steps t 
the fore and demands the attention 

Hockey and archery will be con- 
tinued until the weather no long er 
permits the girls to be outside. The 
winter work in the gymnasium vvill 
consist of class basketball, volley ball 
folk dancing, games, clogging an( j 
gymnastics. The schedule sounds 
both promising and interesting, tj 
rifcr the able coaching of the physic?l 
directress, Miss Fencil, much in the 
wav of advancement in physical edu- 
cation is assured. 

The girls' basketball squad has 
been selected and extensive practise 
is under way for one of the biggest 
years in Lebanon Valley College for 
girls basketball. Quite a number f 
last year's squad is out for practice 
along with a large number of new 
girls, the majority being freshmen 
girls. With Captain Blanche Coch- 
ran are her able cohorts of last year, 
Ruth March, Mary Rupp, Meredith 
Rice, Gladys Hershey, Ruth Arma- 
cost, Ruth Shroyer, Lollita Mummert 
Kathryn Yingst, and Grace Keener. 
This year new members of the pros- 
pective squad are Alma Clark, Gladys 
Wagner, Dorothy Flory, May Fauth, 
Marian Kruger, Agnes Coleman, 
Gloria Laventure, Edith Fields, Mad- 
eline Sheddy, Henrietta Wagner, 
Elizabeth Engle and Helen Frank- 
lin. The year looks very promising. 
The schedule as it now stands is: 

Jan. 18 — Juniata — away. 

Feb. 1 — Juniata — home. 

Feb. 6 — Gettysburg — away. 

Feb. 15 — East Stroudsburg— home. 

Feb. 21 — Albright — away. 

Feb. 27 — Gettysburg— home. 

March 1 — Ursinus — away. 

March 5— Albright — home. 

O 

FRANKNESS IS THEME 

OF PRAYER SERVICE 



The weekly student prayer meet- 
ing was held in Kalo Hall on Tues- 
day evening with Miss Grace Keener 
in charge. The usual devotional 
program was followed. 

Miss Keener chose for her subject 
"Frankness." She spoke of the part 
frankness plays in the everyday 
thinking of every college student and 
how each student should try to be 
frank in everything he does and says. 



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LA VIE C OLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1929. 



PAGE THREE 




«A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES 

—JONATHAN SWIF1 



Oh, Kalusky, what makes you so wonderful? Some fair maiden from 
West Chester terms him "My Big Dream Boy." 

— LVC — 

When the girls returned from basketball practice the other evening 
Mary Buffington wanted to know if they had a sham battle. 

— LVC — 

Ruth Liller (at Reader's Club) : "At the end of Strachey's life he drown- 
ed himself." 

— LVC— 

"Left Tackle" (to Ruth March) : "You're pictures are good except the 
expression." 

— LVC— 

Now that the practise teachers have really started their practising, the 
High School has employed an extra janitor — put on your boots when visit- 
ing one. 

— L VC- 
In harmony class the students are subject to terrific long names and 
here is an example of their effect: 

Kathryn Lutz — Do you know Gaciafano? 

Elvira Ebersole — No, I never remember any of those terms two minutes 
after class. 

— LVC— 

Dr. Wallace in English 43: The Babylonians wrote their letters on 
bricks; hence, to write a long letter was for them like throwing bricks 
at people. 

— LVC— 

Miss Wallace, walking up the ice-covered steps of the Library: This is 
what I call a slippery road to knowledge. 

— LVC— 

Hertzler: I can't get this Ford to start. What should I do? 
Dot" Boyer; Read the directions on the inside of the can. 

— LVC— 

BY RADIO PROM SCOTLAND 

The latest discovery in easy jobs: Garbage collector in Scotland. 

A Scotchman recently divorced his wife because she rinsed out his 
having brush. 



a H the 



— LVC— 

Save your money! Why buy a "College Humor" this month? We'll get 
e jokes from the student toastmasters on Wednesday night. 

— LVC— 

^ernita to Archie, Alumnus, after a quarrel: All right, have it my way. 

— LVC— 

Absent-minded neophyte, John Snyder, got a shoe shine the other day 
an d then remembered he had on his roommate's shoes. 

—LVC— 

New York cops are never excited when they fail to catch a bootlegger. 



Th 



e y know that another one will always come along within a minute or two. 
"(Stevens Stone Mill.) 



-LVC— 



Ike" Grant: What is the difference between learning golf and motor- 
A °ronto: In golf you hit nothing, and in motoring you hit everything. 



TALENT OF FROSH 

SHOWN AT DELPHIAN 



Friday evening, December 6th, 
Delphian enjoyed their freshman tal- 
ent. After devotional exercises, con- 
ducted by Sarah Ensminger, the pro- 
gram was turned over to the fresh- 
men. Billie Coleman acted as mas- 
ter of ceremonies, or as she humor- 
ously put it, she "was the printed 
program." 

Mae Graybill gave a violin solo. 
In the next musical number a Span- 
ish senorita, Gretna Draubaugh, 
with a Hawaiian guitar, lured her 
audience to visions of Spanish man- 
tillas and caballeros. Miss Iceland, 
Trula Kok, told of the Purple Cow, 
the Big Molicepan and delved into 
Metaphysics. The School of Non- 
sense was full of "wise-cracks,'' 
which were enjoyed by everyone. 
Some good chorus numbers were 
given, with Marion Kruger as lead, 
and accompanied on the piano by 
Gloria Laventure. Helen Franklin 
gave a very pretty toe-dance, assist- 
ed by a chorus of four, which inter- 
preted the Spirit of Delphian. 

Delpian Society was pleased to 
welcome three visitors to her meet- 



-O- 



VARIETY FEATURES 

SESSION AT KALO 



Kalo again presented a very inter- 
esting program to its members on 
Friday evening. Although the num- 
ber of spectators was limited, high 
spirit prevailed throuout the evening. 

Mr. Kuhnert opened the program 
by giving an inspirational talk on "A 
Bigger and Better Kalo," and also 
sang, "Onward Christian Soldiers" in 
German. Leonard Schrope then en- 
tertained with "College Selections." 
This including a group of popular 
songs which were well received. 

Mr. Krumbeigle recited a selection 
from Shakespeare. Mr. Kauffman 
conducted a short discussion on "Wo- 
men" while Speg sang "Am I Blue." 
Salada took us up to Lykens where 
he gave us the "dirt" on the "Coal 
Mines." "Babe" Early concluded the 
program with a toe dance. The pro- 
gram was mostly a burlesque but 
proved entertaining. 

O 

DELPHIAN OPERETTA 

FOLLOWS XMAS FEAST 



An operetta, entitled "Miss Carti- 
thers Returns," by Chester Perry, 
will be presented by the Delphian 
Literary Society next Wednesday 
evening, December 18th, at 8 p. m., 
in the chapel. 

It is a musical comedy in two acts. 
Miss Caruthers has been left a large 
estate by her father and has been re- 
quested to continue the support of an 
Art Club in New York City, to which 
he had been contributing. 

After her father's death, Miss Car- 
uthers goes to Europe. On her re- 
turn she determines to find out how 
her money has been used. Therefore, 
she gains entrance to the Art Club as 
a maid. She discovers that Mrs. 
Jones, the matron, has been using 
the money to purchase clothing for 
her niece, Desdemona, who is plan- 
ning to marry a man whom she 
thinks is a millionaire. 

But why tell the rest of the story. 
You will want to come next Wednes- 
day evening, after the Christmas 
banquet, and enjoy the actresses, art 
students, and dancers who live at the 
Art Club in New York City. They 
will give you a treat with musical 
numbers, specialty dancing, and 
chorus work. 

Admission will be twenty-five 
cents per person. Tickets may be se- 
cured from any member of the so- 
ciety. 



GREEK LETTERS FOR 

CLIO CONSIDERED 



Clio held a short business meeting 
on Friday evening. The president, 
Gladys Knaub, presided at the meet- 
ing. Matters pertaining to the anni- 
versary were settled. A discussion 
of adopting Greek letters for Clio 
was introduced. Nominees for the 
Icoming election were passed upon. 

The meeting was then turned into 
an informal group who sang college 
songs and enjoyed a miscellaneous 
program. 

Election will be held in Clio hall 
before the joint-session on Friday 
evening. All are urged to be present. 

O 

HUGHES CONVICTED 

BY PHILO COURT 

The regular meeting of Philokos- 
mian Literary Society was held last 
Friday evening in Philo Hall. Devo- 
tions were conducted by Chester 
Goodman. 

The main part of the program was 
the trial of the notorious criminal, 
John Hughes. The charges against 
him were prevarication, violation of 
the eighteenth amendment, trespass- 
ing, and his guilt as being a hit and 
run driver. Emenheiser ably defend- 
ed Hughes but the prosecuting attor- 
ney, Dellinger, by his masterly cross-' 
examination of the witnesses, obtain- 
ed convincing facts which could not 
be refuted. 

Ulrich, Goodman, and Werner 
gave valuable testimony while Shel- 
lenberger and Miss Waughtel were 
sensational. Judge Knisely had trou- 
ble to keep the court in order while 
they were on the witness stand. 

After the attorneys had made their 
pleas to the jury, the jury retired and 
soon returned with the verdict of 
guilty. Judge Knisely then imposed 
the sentence. 

After the trial a clarinet solo was 
given by Zech and a vocal solo was 
sung by Goodman. Calvin Keene 
criticised the evening's performance. 

O 

JUNIORS TO PRESENT 

PLAY ON JANUARY 11 

Making a complete departure from 
the pageantry and elaborate costum- 
ing which Lebanon Valley dramatics 
usually connote, the Junior Class will 
present a hilarious comedy for the 
annual third year production. The 
play, "The Private Secretary", will 
be given January 11 at 8:00 P. M. 
The players, under the direction of 
Dr. P. A. W. Wallace, are already 
well acquainted with their lines and 
are rapidly learning the action. Prac- 
tices are carried on intensively, the 
purpose being to have the play ready 
for production before the holidays, 
leaving the few days after the recess 
for a final polishing. 

Business Managers, Becker and 
Watkins, are contemplating a rather 
extensive sales campaign, hoping to 
pack the auditorium to capacity. 
Those interested in clerical work of 
a different calibre, should not fail to 
see "The Private Secretary". 

O 

MISS STREBIG HEADS 

DELPHI ANNIVERSARY 

At the business meeting of Del- 
phian Literary Society, held Decem- 
ber 9th, Miss Bernita S. Strebig was 
chosen anniversary president. Other 
officers elected were: vice president, 
Ruth March; recording secretary, 
Dorothy Hafer; corresponding secre- 
tary, Hilda D. Buckley; critic, Mar- 
ion Heaps; chaplain, Ruth Shroyer; 
pianist, Elizabeth Lefever; wardens, 
Elizabeth Engle and Henrietta Wag- 
ner. 

The third term president elected 
was Dorothy Heister. 



QUITTIE GATHERS 

HARVEST OF PHOTOS 



It was with pleasure that the 1931 
Quittie staff checked the lists of the 
upper classes and found a very small 
percentage of said classes had as yet 
failed to submit a photograph for the 
Quittie cut. There are only two more 
days left before the photos are due, 
so we urge these few remaining stu- 
dents to act quickly. The art work 
under Messrs. Spangler and Wolf is 
rapidly progressing and from all in- 
dications will form a pleasing set- 
ting for the book. Other staff mem- 
bers are hard at work on their re- 
spective duties, all working towards 
a Quittie which will exceed the ex- 
pectations of the school. 

O 

FILIPINE YOUTH ARE 

ALARM TO ELDERS 

The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 
held a joint session in chapel, Sun- 
day evening, December 8, to hear 
Dr. Widdoes speak on the youth in 
the Philippines. Dr. Widdoes has 
seen twenty-six years of service in 
that country and knows well of what 
he speaks. 

Only about half the Philippino 
boys and girls ever go through 
school. There is a great lack of 
^teachers and buildings to care for 
them. There is practically no chance 
or opportunity for a young girl or 
boy to earn their way through 
school. 

The Philippinos have a Youth 
movement among the Protestant 
young people which the older gener- 
ation look on with alarm. A few 
statements taken from the Deca- 
logue of this movement illustrate their 
theology. 

(1) They accept Jesus Christ as 
Saviour. 

(2) They believe in Christian in- 
terpretation of nationalism, which 
they can best manage as a free and 
sovereign state, under the leadership 
of Jesus Christ. 

(3) They believe the Holy Bible 
to be inspired, and that it is the duty 
of every Christian to read and study 
it. 

Dr. Widdoes gave a very interest- 
ing account of a Philippino youth who 
had come to this country for an edu- 
cation and won several Greek letters 
for his scholastic ability. Arrange- 
ments had been made by a Minnea- 
polis firm to send him to law school. 
He gave this up, studied for the min- 
istry, and today is moderator of the 
United Evangelical Christian Church 
in the Philippines. 

G 

WORTHY MEN SECURED 

AS CHAPEL SPEAKERS 



The Star Course Committee re- 
ports that plans for the chapel 
speakers for the remainder of the 
school term are almost completed. 
The arrangements are not as yet fin- 
al but the following men will probab- 
ly be on our campus during the com- 
ing months: Harry Holmes, Field 
Secretary of the World Alliance for 
International Friendship, will prob- 
ably be here in January. Charles D. 
Hurrey, Secretary of Committee on 
Friendly Relations among Foreign 
Students, is expected in February. On 
March 12, Dr. H. H. Tweedy, Profes- 
sor of Homiletics at Yale, is booked 
to speak to the students on some 
phase of religion and how it fits into 
everyday life. As the final speaker 
"Bill" Simpson, speaker on social 
matters, will appear in the spring 
These four with the three we have 
already had — namely, "Dinnie" Up- 
ton, Harry Ward and Camilo Osias, 
will complete the schedule of the 
Committee. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1929. 



MYLIN'S HOPES FOR 

STAR QUINTET GOOD 
(Continued from Page 1) 




very fast and good shots. 

Other members of the squad last 
year who will be contenders for posi- 
tions <*re Frey, Thrush, ^artolet, 
guards, and Orsino, forward. 

New men who looked good in pre- 
liminary practises are Fernsler, for- 
mer Lebanon High captain and star 
center; Morrison, Barnes and Stone, 
who played at Massanutten Military 
Academy; Warner who learned his 
fundaments at Hershey and was a 
member of the championship Her- 
shey quintet; Ebling who starred at 
Myerstown High the last few sea- 
sons; Sipe, former member of 
York's championship team; Speg, 
Taylor and Kazlusky are the other 
new men who compose the squad. 

Seven members of the squad are 
six foot tall, or a little taller, which 
will be a big asset to the team. 
O 

CHEMISTS INSPECT 

LINOLEUM COMPANY 

(Continued from Page i) 



colors into regular designs. The mul- 
titude of side processes arising from 
the central need were also noted. 

Returning to the Administration 
building, an interesting interior dec- 
orator explained the fast developing 
importance of linonleum as a floor 
covering which keeps with the ex- 
igent demands for color harmony in 
home decoration. Following this lec- 
ture, the tour was climaxed by a 
walking trip through the building, 
every floor of which is covered with 
linoleum of various designs and 
styles. Special attention was drawn 
to the more unique creations. The 
men of the club were further fasci- 
nated by the stenographers, a fact 
which might explain the interest in 
the business end exhibited by a few. 
Each one was presented with a "Story 
of Floors" and given a cordial invi- 
tation to revisit the plant when the 
contemplated improvements and en- 
largements are completed. The new 
buildings will make room for the 
consolidated divisions of the Arm- 
strong Cork Company in Lancaster, 
and will further add to the prestige 
of the world's largest linoleum con- 
cern. 

O 

POEMS OF ALUMNUS 

USED IN HYMNAL 

The following article appeared in 
Pennsylvania School Journal: "Nor- 
man Schlichter, Pennsylvania poet of 
Annville has been honored by the 
use of eight of his poems, chosen, 
from his books, in a new hymnal for 
young people, 'Singing Pathways', 
edited under the general supervision 
of Norman Richardson of the relig- 
ious education department of North- 
western University." 

The book mentioned has just been 
published and contains works by 
such prominent living English and 
American poets as Masefield, Drink- 
water, Markname, Van Dyke, Teas- 
dale and Reese. 

Mr. Schlichter is one of our grad- 
uates in the class of 1897 and was 
also a member of the faculty for 
eight years, teaching French and 
English. At present he. is a lecturer 
and a member of the Extension Fac- 
ulty of Penn State. 

O 

CLIO-PHILO PREPARE 

FOR JOINT SESSION 



HISTORY IS PROOF 



A joint session of Philos and Clios 
will be held Friday evening, Decem- 
ber 13, at eight o'clock, in Philo Hall 
to which the faculty and students 
are most cordially invited. 

Short skits and vaudeville acts 
will be presented by the combined so 
cities. 



When Clio celebrated its 43rd an- 
niversary, the program afforded to 
the audience an evening of delightful 
and enlightening entertainment. The 
stage of the auditorium in the con- 
servatory was decorated with palms 
and yellow and white chrysanthe- 
mums, Clio's colors. The invocation 
was given by Mae Hoerner, and was 
followed by the president's address 
on the subject, 'America's Unearned 
Increment." 

An organ and piano duet was ren- 
dered by Irma Rhoads and Merle 
Richwine, two of Clio's members 
with musical ability. 

Following this were two addresses, 
made by Louisa Williams on "Prac- 
tical Patriotism" and by Ruth Loser 
on "America's Obligation." 

The Clio chorus under the direc- 
tion of Miss Oyer sang "The Night- 
ingale's Song" — by Nevin, after which 
a reading "Silence" was given by 
Dorothy Lorenz. This reading had 
its scene laid in Deerfield at the time 
of the massacre. 

A delightful reception was given 
after the program in the gymnasium. 

From "College News." 
November 21, 1929. Time has revo- 
lutionized anniversary programs, all 
excepting the end. They still have 
the last number in the "gym." 

O 

STRACHEY IS THEME 

OF CLUB'S CRITIQUE 



'TWAS EVER THUS 



The Reader's Club met at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. P. A. W. Wal- 
lace on Wednesday evening, Decem- 
ber 4» I929i in one of the most suc- 
cessful meetings that the Reader's! 
Club has had for some time. 

The topic for discussion was the 
new biography as introduced by Lit- 
ton Strachey. Ruth Liller gave the 
first talk on the type of biography 
started by Strachey. It was very en- 
lightening and brought out "many 
side-lights ordinarily not known by 
«tudents of biographies. 

"Queen Victoria," one of the ex- 
amples of Strachey's work, was dis- 
cussed by Elizabeth Keister. She did 
this exceptionally well in portraying 
character of Queen Victoria as only 
Strachey can depict her. 

Ethel Hower followed this with an 
especially keen criticism of Strachey's 
"Elizabeth and Essex." Here the 
book was taken from every stand- 
point and was found to withstand 
the requisites of a good biography. 
Everyone helped in making the dis- 
cussion most lively. Much humor 
was discovered in the works of 
Strachey and was highly commended 
by those present. Dr. and Mrs. Wal- 
lace donated their ever ready bits of 
information concerning the subject. 



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(From the pen of an editorial writer) 
How we do despise a man in whom 
we can place no confidence! This is 
the man, too, who finds himself out of 
a position. The story is told of an em- 
ployer who in hunting for a man to 
fill a certain position came to one of 
the officials in a big city. He asked 
the official if there were any men, in 
the city unemployed. The official re- 
plied that there were scores of them 
and he felt sure that the employer 
could find one to suit his purpose. The 
employer said, "It's a $12,000 per year 
job." 

"Go on to the next city," answered 
the official. 

We feel sure that to form good hab- 
its, such as keeping promises and ap- 
pointments, punctuality, accurateness, 
etc., is a very valuable asset to each 
one of us. Very plainly do we see the 
need of forming the habit of punctual- 
ity by the number of late arrivals to 
c lasses. Our classes are scheduled for 
a certain hour and we should get there 
at that time and not one, two or three 
minutes late. 



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Stationery, Fountain Pens, Book 
Ends, Pencils, Writing Cases, Ad- 
dress Books, Scrap Books, Purses, 
Pastime Puzzles, and many other 
things too numerous to mention. 

BOLLMANS 

33 South Eighth Street, 
Lebanon, Pa. 



i 



Id. l saylor & sons 

Contractors 

LUMBER AND COAL 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



F. W. GERBERICH'S STORfc 

FRESH GROCERIES, 
SODAS and ICE CREAM 



29 Sheridan Ave., Annville, p 



a. 



YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
A Mesage of Love to the Folks 
at Home 

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820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PRINTING 




PUBLICATION. 
BOOKS, CATA- 
LOGUES, STATION- 
ERY, CARDS, TAGS, 

ANNVILLE PRINTING 
COMPANY 



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RUSSEL and SPANGLER 

Our Agents At 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
FINKELSTEIN 
Cleaners & Dyers 



TRY OUR HOME MADE 
SANDWICHES 

QUALITY LUNCH 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 
A Specialty 

7 E. Main St. Annville, Pa. S 



Fine assortment of Watches, Rings,, 

Chains, & etc. 
New Century Chiming Grandfather 
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LIGHT'S JEWELRY STORE 
51 West Main St. 

For Quality 

Baked Products 

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in 

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Repairs at Special Rates 
Go To 

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CLOTHING F QUALITY 

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UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



A MERRY YULETIDE TO 
FACULTY, STUDENTS 
AND FRIENDS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



A HAPPY, PROSPEROUS 
NEW YEAR FOR ALL 
OUR READERS 



VOLUME V 



A XNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1929. 



PAGEANT CAST PUTS 
ON FINAL TOUCHES 



DIRECTORS OF MUSIC 
AND DRAMA AIM 
FOR SUCCESS 



In spite of the many handicaps 
which the "Y" Pageant-Cantata has 
had to face, intensive rehearsals for 
the "Heavenly Host" are now being 
held to make this presentation as 
creditable as those of other years. 
The pageant directors, Mrs. Ruth 
Engle Bender in charge of the mus : c 
and Miss Anne Gordon and Mr. War- 
ren Burtner, the directress and direc- 
tor respectively of the dramatic por- 
tions, have had obstacles to over- 
come this year which have confront- 
ed no other similar committee on the 
campus in the memory of any pres- 
ent student. 

Not only did numerous students 
who were offered parts refuse them, 
but many others took them, and, al- 
though many changed their minds 
about remaining in the cast, thev 
even had no time available to be 
courteous and inform the directors 
in this respect. Furthermore, such 
large casts as pageants demand can- 
not effectively practice in a society 
hall, but demand a large stage as the 
chapel would provide. The "Y" com- 
mittee has had fhe utmost difficulty in 
securing the chapel for the rehearsals 

(Continued on Pair* 4) 

O 



No. 11. 



HISTORY CLUB VIEW 

KELLOGG PEACE PACT 

Sixteen members of the History 
C1 ub attended the forum held at the 
home of Professor Stevenson, 
Wednesday evening. December n. 
n The topics for discussion were the 
"Russian-Chinese Affairs" and the 
Kelloggr-Brand Pact." The discus- 
SI °n was opened by Professor Ste- 
venson, who gave an explanation of 
th e treaty and how it could be ap- 
Pl'ed in the Russo-Chinese affair. Pro- 
es sor Stokes contributed two main 
P° ln ts of the treaty which were "ar- 
• ^tion" and "conciliation." 

^yery member entered into the dis- 
cussion and it was final , 

vote Tt, i . 

;• me result was a unanimous 

e ^si on against the treaty. 
Refreshments were served which 
k e ' e thoroughly enjoyed by every- 



-O- 



A LUMNUS MADE JUDGE 

OF CAMBRIA COUNTY 



p Ju dge of the Court of Common 

that 'i atllbr,a County, is the honor 
1 has 



Mck- as reccntl y come to Ivan J- 

dricfc lrick - Tn 1905 Mr - McKen_ 
tor gracu, ated from the Conserva- 
tive^ a student of organ. He rc- 
th e T . LL.B. degree in 1905 from 
lis ^diana Law School, Indianapo- 

o n ] ^ Ivan J- McKendrick was the 

^ e Pubr 10Crat e,ected in a strongly 
a tr ib u 1Can Col,r| ty. His election is 
triand C t0 tllC respect wn ' cn fie com- 
s ln the countv. 



SKITS ARE FEATURE 

OF PHILO-CLIOS 

Pfiilokosmian and Clionian Liter- 
ary Societies presented a very inter- 
esting program Friday, December 13, 
at their first joint session of the year. 
The session, which was held in Philo 
Hall, was attended by a large num- 
ber of friends and members of all 
societies. 

Devotions were led by the Philo 
chaplain, Mr. Goodman. The presi- 
dent, William Myers, gave a short 
speech of welcome. 

"Whoopee in the Modern Home" 
was the title of a skit featuring Ed- 
gar Hertzler and Mildred Saylor, rep. 
resenting two angles of the triangle. 
The latter portrayed a modern wife 
while Hertzler played the role of her 
more conservative husband who fear- 
ed the third angle of the triangle, 
Calvin Keene. Master Tony Wallace 
was their small son. The skit was 
interspersed with songs and dances. 
Irene Peters and the radio quartette, 
composed of Calvin Keene, Taylor, 
Goodman and Paul Keene, furnished 
the songs, while Mary McCurdy, Mil- 
dred Saylor, Mary Stager, and Jos- 
ephine Yake were the dancers. 

Josephine Yake and Paul Keene 
sang several popular numbers. 

"The Lost Silk Hat," a one act 
play, was the final part of tfie pro- 
gram. Paul Evancoe, tfie leading 
man, left his hat in the home of his 
sweetheart after a quarrel. The rest 
of the cast included Messrs. Hughes, 
Goodman, Shellenberger and Del- 
linger. 

Following the program a social 
hour was enjoyed and refreshments 
were served. 

DELPHIANS SEEN IN 
CLEVER PRODUCTION 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



I Thursday evening, Dec. 19. — "Y" j 
Xmas Cantata in Engle Hall at j 
8 o'clock. 

I Christmas Caroling by students af- ! 
{ ter Pagean;. 

J Friday morning, Dec. 20.— 6:30 j 
j Chapel. j 
j Saturday. Dec. 21. — Xmas recess j 
; begins. 

M. — I 



Edward Johnson, Metropolitan 
tenor, gave a most delightful concert 
Wednesday evening, December 11, in 
the Chestnut Street Auditorium, Har 
risburg. His personality, radiating 
culture and intellect as well as a 
great love for humanity, combined 
with a rare voice and vivid interpre 
tations, charmed all who heard the 
recital. His excerpts from opera 
were especially realistic, some of 
which were, "La Boheme'", "Louise", 
and "Pagliacci". 

His accompanist, Blair Neale, dis 
played a fine musicianship and pian- 
istic talent, as well as being a sym- 
pathetic accompanist. 

Mrs. Mary C. Green, Dean of wo 
men, a personal acquaintance of Mr 
Johnson, held a dinner party in his 
WIFE OF PRESIDENT . honor after the concert at the Hotel 
IS A PATIENT AT ! Penn Harris. 

JOHNS HOPKINS Others attending the concert from 
i the College were: Dr. and Mrs. An- 

r r, r- , m , drew Bender, Miss Ethel Myers, Mis? 

Vj. D. Gossard, on Tuesday T ^ TT 

y _ Leila Flory, Hilda Hess, Alcesta 

Slichter, and Gardner Savior. 



I Monday, Jan. 6, T930, 1 P 
I Classes begin. 
I Saturday, Jan. n, 1930 — Junior ! 
) Class Play. j 



MRS. GOSSARD HAS 
SERIOUS OPERATION 



MUSIC PATRONS HEAR 

METROPOLITAN STAR 



Mrs. 



-()- 



STUDENTS APPEAR 
IN SECOND CONCERT 



SENIOR MUSICIANS 
ADD INTEREST 
TO EVENT 



TERPSICHOREAN ART 
EXECUTED BY 
TALENT 



The operetta, entitled "Miss Caru- 
ther's Return," by Chester Perry, 
which was given by tfie Delphian 
Literary Society on Wednesday 
evening, was full of talent such as 
toe dancing, clogging, singing, 
chorus work, and piano solos. In 
fact, it was just such talent as one 
might expect to find in a cosmopol- 
itan Art Club of New York City. 

The girls did exceptionally well, 
since they practised in a week's time 
what they had planned to do in four. 
Delphian Literary Society is sincere- 
ly grateful to Miss Louise Pencil, 
Prof. Crawford, and Bernita Strebig 
for the time and effort they spent in 
poaching and directing the work. 

This musical comedy gave the aud- 
ience an opportunity to enjoy for the 
first time some new and different 
talent. Tfie toe-dancing of Helen 
Franklin was thoroughly enjoyed. 
The clog dance, with Gladys Her- 
sfiey, Olive Weigle and Katfiryn 
Yingst, showed skill. The dancing 
chorus, with Augusta Trokte, Doro- 
thy Forry, Gladys Hershey, Anne 
(Continued on Page 4) 



morning underwent an operation of 
the most delicate nature at the Johns 
Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. The 
operation itself was successful and 
Dr. Danby, under whose care Airs. 
Gossard has been placed, is confident 
of her recovery, barring any unfore- 
seen complications. 

The students regret Mrs. Gossard's 
illness and unite in their hopes for 
her speedy return to normal health. 
O 

CABINETS LEAD IN 

CHAPEL WORSHIP The secon( l students' recital of the 

j year was held in Engle Hall, Monday 

The cabinets of the Y. W. and Y. ' evening, December 16. The organ 
M. C. A. were in charge of a digni- students taking part were Eleanor 
fied cfiapel service Tuesday morning. Kissinger, Violet Walter, and Hilda 
Opening with "Jesus Savior Pilot Hess. All of their numbers were ap- 
Me" as a prelude on the organ by propnte to the Christmas season, and 
Olive Weigle, a solemn atmosphere were nnel Y interpreted. Tfie pian- 
pervaded tfie entire service. j ist s were Tfieodore Walker, Alma 

Following the reading of the an- Clark, and Alcesta Slicfiter, all of 
nouncements by Madeline Rife, she whom played with a clarity of tech- 
conducted a proper worship service n 'c and breadth of expression. Mar- 
by intermingling Scripture appro- garet Young, soprano, represented the 
priate to the Christmas season and voice department. Her voice showed 
prayer much improvement over her previous 

A litany was then conducted by performances. 
Robert Randabush with the response: The program included: 
by the entire cabinets. I Spooks (Bilbro), Catharine Kreider; 

Dr. Richie completed the service Rondo-Etude (Armstrong), Helen 
by calling for a prayer for Mrs. Gos- j Kreider; Yalse in E Minor (Chopin), 
sard who was then undergoing an Alma Clarke; Jesu Bambino (Yon), 
operation at Johns Hopkin's Hospi- Eleanore Kissinger; Dawn (Curran) 
\a\. The students filed out of tfie A Bird Note Calling (Spross), Thy 
-chapel in a silent, reverent attitude. Sweet Singing (Olmstead), Margaret 

O ' j Young; Valse Chromatique (Godard), 

Theodore Walker; Christmas Medita- 
tion (Faulkes), Violet Walter; Gav- 
otte and Musette (Sgambati), Alcesta 
Slichter; Tfie Holy Night (Buck) 
Hilda Hess. 

O 

CHRISTMAS CAROLS 

FOLLOW PAGEANT 

After tfie Christmas pageant this 
evening, one of Lebanon Valley's an- 
nual customs, that of Christmas car- 
oling, will be observed. Each year 
before the holidays, the students visit 
the homes of the professors and sing 
hymns appropriate for the season. 
Everyone is urged to join the carol- 
ers and enjoy the occasion. 



STORK VISITS HOME 

OF POPULAR ALUMNUS 



Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Piela an- 
nounce the birth of a son, on Friday, 
December 1.3th. Mr. Piela is a grad- 
uate of the class of '29, and is now 
teaching in Philadelphia. Mrs. Piela 
was formerly Miss Margaret Berrier, 
a trained nurse of Lebanon. Mr. and 
Mrs. Piela will call their son Stanley, 
Jr. _ 
j TO* SUBSCRIBERS J 

' On account of the Christmas? 
j holidays, there will be no issue of j 
j LA VIE until January 9, 1930. j 



TURKEY ENTICES 
STUDESTO FEAST 

DINING HALLS BECOME 
BROADCASTING 
STATIONS 



Again the spirit of the Christmas 
holidays found an outlet in the an- 
nual banquet, which this year took 
the unique form of a radio program. 
To aid digest the palatable dinner of 
turkey and the accessories, from fruit 
cups to mints, two broadcasting sta- 
tions filled tfie air with anecdotes fit- 
ting the occasion. The "Eight Tube 
Set" with Miss Cooper as operator 
and Miss Hess, Mr. Morgan, Miss 
Shroyer, and Mr. Stone as broadcast- 
ers, entertained the diners in the 
large hall with a most clever L. V. 
Hour. Taking a step away from the 
usual routine of after dinner speech- 
es, each spoke in line with his posi- 
tion. These were respectively 
"Mike", Transmitter, Loudspeaker, 
and Static. A "Four Tube Set" with 
Mr. Keene as operator and Mr. 
Kauffman, Miss Ensminger, Mr. 
Morris, and Miss Gohn as broadcast- 
ers, accomplished the same results in 
the small dining hall. 

Blinking lights, the aroma of hem- 
lock, and the tingle of enthusiasm 
for the coming vacation all united in 
making the affair a gala festivity. (3f 
course, a jolly time was enjoyed by 
everyone present. 

O 



LADIES' AUXILIARY 

HAVE XMAS PARTY 



The Ladies' Auxiliary of Lebanon 
Valley College had their annual 
Christmas party on Thursday after- 
noon, December 12, in North Hall 
Parlor. The girls of the college, rep- 
resentatives of both societies, pro- 
vided the entertainment. 

Delphian Literary Society had as 
its first number, "Singing in the 
Rain" sung by a chorus of girls at- 
tired in rain coats. They followed 
with a clever mechanical series of 
acrobatic stunts, while singing "Paint- 
ing the Clouds with Sunshine." Helen 
Franklin, as the spirit of Delphian, 
gave an interpretative toe dance. 
Gretna Drawbaugh played "Farewell 
to Thee - ' on the guitar, accompanied 
on the piano by Ruth Coble. Mary 
Goshert played Debussy's "Claire de 
Lune" on the piano. 

Clio Literary Society made an elab- 
orate showing in the "Wedding of 
the Painted Doll." Following thrs 
Irene Peter sang, accompanied by 
Hilda Hess at the piano. Eight girls 
from the society then sang "Silent 
Night" and "Hark the Herald Angels 
Sing" in the musical scale. This 
ompleted the program. 

Miss Minnie Gossard and Madame 
Green acted as hostesses in the ab- 
sence of Mrs. Gossard who was un- 
able to be there on account of ill- 
ness. Olive Morrow, Josephine 
Yake, Mary McCurdy and Gladys 
Knaub did the honors of serving de- 
licious refreshments which everyone 
thoroughly enjoyed. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, . 1929. 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Under- 
graduate Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Esther Angstadt, '30 . . Editor-in-Chief 
Gladys Knaub, '30 . . Associate Editor 
J. Calvin Keene, '30 . . Associate Editor 
C. Alfred Shenk, '30 . Managing Editor 

SEPOKTOKIAL STAFF 

Grace Keener, '30 

Warren E. Burtner. '30 

Ruth Shroyer, '32 

Kussell Morgan, '31 

Rbt. L. Raudabush. '31 •«•• 

General Reporters 

Alcesta Slichter. '30 Conservatory 

A, Edgar Shroyer, '30 Athletics 

Hilda Hess. '30 Clionian 

Hilda Buckley, '32 Delphian 

Philip Barnes, '31 Kalozetean 

Robert Rawhouser, '32 . Philokosmian 
Edna Early, '31 Al umni Reporter 

BUSINESS STAFF 

John Snyder, '30 ... Business Manager 
Alexander Grant, '31 

Assistan Business Manager 

William J. Myers. 'o0 

Circulation Manager 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Dr. Paul A. "W. Wallace, English Dept. 
Miss Mary K. Wallace, English Dept 
Dr. Paul S. Wagner, Math. Dept. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. a member 
of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation of the Middle Atlantic States. 



Single Copies 10 cents 

Subscription $1.50 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post- 
office as second class matter under the 
Act of March 3, 1879. 



CO-EDS, WHEN WILL YOU 

PAY FOR YOUR CANDY? 



In the last issue of La Vie there 
appeared a summary of an editorial 
printed ten years ago in "The College 
News" concerning punctuality. This 
again becomes the basis for an article 
at present. 

This editorial is prompted by the 
situation in the girls' dormitories re- 
garding the payment of candy which I 
the 'Y' cabinet is selling. Every year* 
we feel that we can trust our fellow- 
men and hence the candy is placed on 
display with a box for cash nearby. 
The candy is used but the money box 
for some reasons is not playing a 
leading role. Consequently the 'Y' 
Cabinet is unable to meet their candy 
bills because the girls insist on not 
paying for their candy. 

We do not think that the girls are 
purposely dishonest, but that there is 
simply a lack of punctuality in meet- 
ing their obligations. Why should the 
persons selling the candy be forced 
to tour the dormintories and ask if 
you have bought any candy and for- 
gotten to pay for it? It is such a 
small courtesy to think of the other 
person in such cases and save them 
many extra steps by developing the 
habit of prompt payment. 

When will the girls pay for their 
candy? The Y. W. does not care to 
openly suspect the girls of dishon- 
esty by placing the candy under lock 
and key, but what other method can 
you suggest when the girls insist 
upon the ruination of their own con- 
veniences. 

To the persons for whose benefit 
this editorial is written we suggest 
that you take inventory before leav- 
ing school this year and pay all old 
bills, and thus make it possible for 
the girls to enjoy an open candy store 
in their dormitories. 

O ■ 



ARE YOU GUILTY? 



One of the tnost disgusting pieces 
of non-cooperation, and one that 
should be handed down to Lebanon 
Valley posterity as the classic exam- 
ple, has been shown to us during the 
past week and a half. We are refer- 
ring, of course, to the Christmas pag- 
eant. 

The program chosen by the "Y" 
cabinets is very difficult and requires 
a great deal of hard work. The char- 
acters were selected with care, so 
that people who were taking part in 



the Junior play and Delphian Operet- 
ta would not be asked to do this also. 
In other words, no person chosen had 
part in any other immediately press- 
ing major activity. But what was 
the result? Almost two weeks ago 
rehearsals were called. Sometimes not 
one of the cast turned up; at others 
half of them came. Last Monday 
night was the first full rehearsal that 
could be held. Yet, there was no real 
reason, except simply lack of interest 
on the part of most of those included 
in the cast. 

We are not trying to find fault with 
the few faithful who attended every 
rehearsal. They deserve nothing but 
commendation. But those who re- 
fused to cooperate should feel how 
despicable their conduct was. Some 
few absolutely refused to even con- 
sider taking part. Most of these were 
upper classmen who gave as their 
plea "Too busy". That is an excuse 
always ready in time of need, but, as 
we have pointed out, since no one 
having part in the play 'or operetta 
was asked, this argument was null 
and void and simply meant "I don't 
want to be bothered". 

On the other hand, the under 
classmen failed to attend many of 
the practices and in general showed 
lack of cooperation. To them we 
would say that the time is coming 
when they will be responsible for the 
success of this custom and will ex- 
pect cooperation from the other stu- 
dents and under classmen. Remem- 
ber the Golden Rule! 

So, if the pageant this year is not 
all that it should be, it will not be 
the fault solely of the directress and 
director. It will be the fault direct- 
ly of those who were supposed to 
have been dependable but have shown 
that they were not. 

But why say more? Words are too 
tfeeble vehicles of thought to do the 
situation justice. 



BEYOND THE CAMPUS 



SAFER AVIATION 



The newest contrivance for mak- 
ing aviation safer and easier is the 
Sperry gyroscope stabilizer. This 
invention is a combination of two 
gyroscope wheels, one of which is 
horizontal and the other vertical. 
The entire apparatus weighs only 
fifty pounds and fits easily under the 
pilot's seat. By its use the plane 
must fly on an even keel, for as soon 
as it tilts to one side or flys at an 
angle, the gyroscopes bring it back 
to a level position. It makes auto- 
matic airplane control practical. In 
a recent trial flight one of them con- 
trolled a plane for 300 miles with- 
out any person touching the con- 
trols. 



FREUD DEBUNKED 



Dr. R. J. Berry of the University 
of Melbourne, Australia, appears to 
think that "Freud" should be spelled 
with an "a" in place of the "e". Dr. 
Berry is conducting a special inves- 
tigation of the functions of the 
brain. He says that people who are 
deficient in the number of brain 
cells avidly devour the teachings of 
psychoanalysis and Freudianism. He 
claims that Freud knows nothing 
about the brain itself, but lays all 
the emphasis for behavior upon sex 
which, altho it is one of the most 
deep seated of the passions, certainly 
does not lie at the base of all human 
actions. The doctor believes that 
the human brain is the essential in- 
strument of human conduct and that 
all great future development in psy- 
chology will come as a result of the 
study of this organ. 



We Pay Tribute To- 




DR. PAUL A. W. WALLACE 



The measure by which we gauge 
the worth of people today is usually 
by the one word "Broad-minded". If 
we can apply that epithet to a per- 
son, we feel that he has the one qual- 
ity we expect. We cannot apply this 
term to Dr. Wallace. He is more 
than "Ibroad-minded." Association 
with him makes us suspect that his 
mind resembles the hub of a wheel. 
Present him with a problem and im- 
mediately his mind seems to radiate 
thoughts in numerous but disciplined 
lines, as the spokes of a wheel. He 
sees every possible phase of the prob- 
lem and never fails to weed out the 
worthless, leaving the worthwhile. Dr. 
Wallace seems to have the gift of 
perfectly adjusting his decisions so 
that they will best serve the problem 
presented to him. 

As such a keen observer of life it 
is not surprising to find that Dr. 
Wallace has also the art of directing 
vicarious life — dramatics. One disin- 
terested critic, on the night that 



"Saint Joan" was presented here, 
with Dr. Wallace as director, ex- 
claimed that it was as good a piece 
of professional work as he had ever 
seen in a play of that type. The pro- 
duction oi Rostand's "Cyrano ole 
Bergerac" is another gigantic piece 
of drama that Dr. Wallace turned in- 
to an unquestionable success, in spite 
of the tact that he was working with 
amateurs. 

there is another quality we musi 
mention, especially as lew people 
realize the proiessor possesses it. Dr. 
Wallace is undoubtedly an efficient 
salesman. YV'ho has not looked at the 
hrst Hue of Chaucer's Prologue and 
groaned at the sight of such spell- 
ing. Who has not begun the year's 
study of Shakespeare regretting that 
this gentleman wrote enough to last 
a year. The same students who de- 
spair at the beginning are the boos- 
ters the next year. By his very en- 
thusiasism for his work he sells to us 
his wares we did not want but event- 
ually leam to appreciate — be it Chan- 
cer or Shakespeare. 

LA VIE undoubtedly owes its ex- 
istence in great part to Dr. Wallace. 
When he arrived on our campus in 
1925, there had been no college paper 
since 1923. During his second or 
third month here, the college launch- 
ed a paper that could compete fav- 
orably with the journalism of our 
rival colleges. He began in Septem- 
ber his fifth year as literary adviser 
of the paper. Every staff that has 
worked under Dr. Wallace is indebt- 
ed to him for his ever ready advice, 
for his constant willingness to help, 
and for time and effort he has given 
ually learn to appreciate — be it Chau- 
unsparingly toward the improvement 



XMAS SPIRIT REIGNS 

AT SOUTH HALL FETE 



As the clock struck ten Monday 
evening, December 13, the girl s Q j 
South Hall tip-toed down to the p ar 
lor to enjoy one of the famous 
Christmas parties which this hall ha s 
every year. The rooms were deco- 
rated with the customary holly 
Lights were made mystic by the use 
of red crepe paper. The large spru Ce 
tree adorned one corner of the huge 
room and was laden with Christinas 
balls and tinsel. 

Here Santa Claus appeared and 
presented to each girl a fitting re- 
membrance. Miss Wallace received 
a beautiful neck-lace. 

After the gifts had been given the 
Program Committee had provided a 
clever entertainment and much hilar- 
ity followed each of the acts. "Eats" 
and then "more eats" naturally cli- 
maxed the event, making this one of 
the most successful Christmas par- 
ties that South Hall has ever given. 

O 



POPULAR MAGAZINES 

FOR READING ROOM 



ASHES ON MOON 



The surface of the moon is prob- 
ably covered with some porous ma- 
terial, such as cinder and ashes like 
that thrown by volcanoes. This is the 
conclusion reached by astronomers 
at the Mt. Wilson observatory, who 
have been experimenting with a 
moon thermometer which consists of 
a delicate apparatus for measuring 
heat rays. It is found that when 
the sun shines on the surface of the 
moon it gets very hot, but after the 
sun goes down it cools rapidly. 
Hence it is concluded that the sur- 
face must be composed of some por- 
ous material such as pumice or vol- 
canic ash. — (Pathfinder.) 

WAR OF FASHIONS 



The war of fashions rages. Shall 
dresses be long or short, how broad 
shall the hat brim be, and the loca- 
tion and circumference of the waist 
are the chief causes of the war. The 
textile manufacturers, for obvious 
reasons, favor the long dresses. The 
silk stocking interests, for equally 
obvious reasons, prefer the short 
ones. The few surviving corset mag- 
nates are attempting to reinstate 
their articles of bondage. Dress de- 
signers favor the new styles as giv- 
ing them more scope for their art. 
Clothing merchants depend on chang- 
ng styles for their business and 
since dresses can go in only one di- 
rection and still retain their name, 
they, too, favor the four inch below 
the knee style. On the other hand, 
the women who believe in liberty and 
comfort for their sex m?.n, or per- 
haps it would be more correct to say 
woman, the guns. They are upheld 
by the medical authorities. One de- 
signer has sought the golden mean 
and proposes short skirts for street 
wear and long ones for evening. He 
is receiving the full charge of the 
onslought. 



GIRLS ARE GUESTS 

OF MADAME GREEN 



Madame Green was a gracious 
hostess to the girls of North Hall on 
Tuesday evening at 9:30 P. M. 

After the girls had grouped in- 
formally on the second floor hall, 
Miss Ruth Cooper and Miss Olive 
Weigle assisted Madame Green in 
serving delicious refreshments of hot 
chocolate and Christmas cookies to 
all the girls. After the girls had 
feasted abundantly, for there were 
not only ''seconds," but even "thirds," 
Miss Blanche Cochran, the lusty hall 
president, led in a few cheers for the 
Dean and the guests dispersed to 
their various rooms. 



The Y. M. C. A. Cabinet met last 
Thursday evening to discuss the im- 
portant matter of a budget and other 
problems facing it. After much argu- 
ment concerning the budget and a 
few revisions, the cabinet accepted 
and ratified it for immediate use. 

The other matter which came be- 
fore the group was that of reading 
material for the "Y" room. It was 
suggested that magazines be bought 
for the newly equipped room and that 
the magazines, if bought, should re- 
main where they are placed. The 
proposition was discussed pro and 
con, and after serious thought it was 
decided that current magazines, which 
are not provided by the library, 
should be placed at the disposal of the 
students. It was emphasized that if 
the reading material was removed 
from the room, the "cabinet would 
cease to furnish it. 



-O- 



EARLY XMAS SERVICE 

OF Y'S IN CHAPEL 



The Y's are planning for the an- 
nual early morning Christmas service 
without which our round of Christ- 
mas festivities is never complete. 

This year there will be an impres- 
sive candlelight service in the chape 
at 6:30 on Friday morning. Specia 
music and other numbers have been 
very carefully chosen and prepared- 
The faculty and students are invite^ 
to enjoy these few moments of rea 
Christimas worship. 



CLOTHING F QUALITY 

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Lebanon, Pa. 



KREAMER BROS. 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1929'. 



PAGE THREE 




«A COLLEGE JOKE TO CURE THE 'BLUES ' 

-JON A THAN S Wltl » 



Book Review 



THE SCEPTRED FLUTE 
By Sarojini Naidu 




RESOLUTIONS MADE BY FACULTY 

FOR NEW YEAR ARE PURLOINED 

A mystery surrounds the means by which Joe Dawgone has secured the 
faculty's New Year's resolutions. One night Joe Dawgone went to bed. 
Nothing was under his door. The next A. M. he found a Blue Book. Now 
Joe D. doesn't take exams. He is similar to prots — in a way — tor he tells 
us ALL he knows. He picked up the Blue Book and, like the prots, had no 
other desire but to fling it into the scrap basket. But words written in 
flaming red ink on the blue background surprised him: '"New i ear s Reso- 
lutions of the faculty." Now Joe D. was interested for two reasons, .tie 
grinned hrst of all at the idea of making the new resolutons so early in the 
old year, it gave to the resoiver a zest to enjoy the om sins ^o ute limit 
because they would soon be taboo. In the second piace, vviia^ must the 
commissions be of a learned group of men and women who saw uie neeu 
of reiorm on January i, 193,1, even if by the end of the monui tne tradition- 
ally absent-minded ladies and gentlemen had forgotten they ever subscribed 
to such a movement as New Year's Resolutions. 

Joe Dawgone gives minus censorship what he read in the Biue Book: 
Dr. Gossard: All holidays shall be printed in the Bulletin in red ink. there 
shall be numerous lines in red type next year for the conscientious 
socializers in the library and the active members of "sessions" in the 
"dorms" who work so late. 

Coach Mylin: I shall refrain from the use of any word not recommended 
by D. Webster. Between halves I shall be very calm. If the boys are 
nervous, I shall recite to them such poems as "Oh, young Lochinvar 
has come out of the West," or the "Ode on a Grecian Urn." If the 
boys are VERY perturbed, I shall recite with gestures "The Charge 
of the Light Brigade" to give them spirit for the next half. 

Prof. Grimm : (Here Joe Dawgone notes some indecision.) "I shall refrain 
from the habitual use of a toothpick" was first written and scratched 
out. Joe quotes the only authentic notation this individualist made as, 
'I hope someone buys me a box of toothpicks." (Evidently the pro- 
fessor believes more in gift suggestions than in resolutions.) 

Prof. Gingrich: My motto is "Be kind to dumb animals." 1 have alreadv 
put my motto into practice by outfitting my hound with neat-fit- 
ting, brown leather shoes for his f'orepaws. Said shoes lace neatly up 
the front and are tied in bows at the top. All this for the ONE dumb 
animal! But I will do even more than that. There shall be no 
flunks" in any of my classes this semester. 

^ f of. Fields: I shall publish a list of the "trotters" if they don't reform. 

^ lss Myers: I have ALMOST resolved to subscribe for "College Humor." 

Dr. Butterwick: "A little nonsense now and then is relished by the best 
of men." Hence, my classes may expect more and funnier jokes. 

^of. Stokes: I shall limit my Blue Books to one per person at each exam. 
(That's right, Prof. Why waste "the midnight oil" in reading inflated 
answers.) 

* Barnhart, Skipper of the Good Ship Lebanon Valley: A collector of 
revenue cannot afford to make any resolutions. He MUST get "the 
dough", and in spite of a NEW YEAR bills must be paid upon receipt. 

— LVC— 

SUGGESTION FOR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING! 

J°e Dawgone's telescope serves the purpose for use in the daytime. But 
• ln k of all he might learn with a revolving beacon light at night. The 
eir ietery-on-the-hill! The lumber yard! And we'd all find out "Who's Who" 
n Annville by beaconlight. Let's help Joe Dawgone to he a better reporter 



by 



equipping him for night duty— especially since his business is booming. 



Since "Mother India" appeared on 
the bookstalls, India has lost its 
magic for the world. It takes the 
songs of one of India's own daugh- 
ters, Sarojini Naidu, to revive in us 
that glamour of this country of 
fatalists, vagabonds, temples. Brah- 
mins kneeling to Allah, and the om- 
nipresent beggar. Madam Naidu, 
unlike that other great Hindu poet, 
Tagore, writes her verses in English, 
so that nothing is lost by translation. 

Mme. Naidu is described in the 
preface as "a small, vivid woman. 
Her hands are vital. Her eyes are 
liquid brown, luminous, electric. Hei 
spirit kindles and communicates fire. 
And yet, astonishing as it may seem, 
she is essentially a tranquil person- 
ality She thinks with hei 

nerves. She feels with her intellect.' 

Thoroughly modern is Mme. Naidu 
in the dual role she has played as the 
mother of four children and a poli- 
tician. In the latter role she served 
her country as the President of the 
Indian National Congress. 

"The Sceptred Flute" is a compil- 
ation of her poems up to 1928. 

There is a lyrical note throughout 
her work. Whether she is the de-j 
spondent fatalist, the half cynical? 
philosopher, or the defeated lover, 
there is that magical quality born of 

her country that has somehow slip- 
ped into her lines, making even grim 
despair beautiful. Beauty seems to 
be the keynote of her poems. 

"Indian Weavers" shows Mme. 
Naidu in one of her desparing moods, 
yet a mood that is sweet, notwith- 
standing. 

"'Weavers, weaving at break of day, 
Why do you weave a garment so 

gay? 

Blue as the wing of a halcyon wild, 
We weave the robes of a new-born 

child. 

Weavers, weaving at fall of night, 

Why do you weave a garment so 
bright? 

Like the plumes of a peacock, pur- 
ple and green, 

We weave the marriage-veils of a 
queen. 

\ 

Weavers, weaving solemn and still, 
What do you weave in the moonlight 

chill? 

White as a feather and white as a 

cloud, 

We weave a dead man's funeral 
shroud." 

Thoroughly interpretative of the 
fatalism and utter abandon of the 
Hindu is the poem "Wandering 
Singers", 

Where the voice of the wind calls our 

wandering feet, 
Through echoing forest and echoing 

street, 

With lutes in our hands ever-singing 
we roam, 

All men are our kindred, the world 
is our home. 

Our lays arc of cities whose lustre 
is shed, 

The laaighter and beauty of women 

long dead; 
The sword of old battles, the crown 

of old kings, 
And happy and simple and sorrowful 

things. 



What hope shall we gather, what 

dreams shall we sow? 
WBiere the wind calls our wandering 

footsteps we go. 
No love bids us tarry, no joy bids 

us wait; 

The voice of the wind is the voice of 
our fate." 

When Mme. Naidu sings of love, it 
is with an intensity and vehemence 
that makes the emotion seem almost 
a part of the reader's own being, in 
one poem she vehemently sings: 

i 

"Love, I am yours to lie in your 

breast like a flower, 
Or burn like a weed for your sake 
in the flame of hell." 

What lover will not recognize as 
his or her own the pangs she dis- 
closes in "The Poet's Love Song": 

In noon-tide hours, O Love, secure 

and strong, 
I need thee not; mad dreams arc 

mine to bind 
The world to my desire, and hold 

the wind 

A voiceless captive to my conquer- 
ing song. 

I need thee not, I am content 
with these: 

Keep silence in thy soul, beyond 
the seas ! 

But in the desolate hour of mid- 
night, when 
An ecstasy of starry silence sleeps 
On the still mountain and the 
soundless deeps, 
And my soul hungers for thy voice, 
O then, 

Love, like the magic of wild 

melodies, 
Let thy soul answer mine across 

the seas." 

Nowhere is there a brighter ray of 
hope shining through despair than in 
Mme. Naidu's poem "To India." She 
recognizes the weakness of her coun- 
try, but the first verse shows her ab- 
solute faith in a better future for 
India. One might call this a chal- 
lenge to "Mother India": 

"O young through all thy im- 
memorial years; 
Rise, Mother, Rise, regenerate 
from thy gloom, 
! And, like a bride high-mated with 
the spheres, 
Beget new glories from thine age- 
less womb!" 

A poetess of despair, fate, hope, of 
vivid Hindu pictures — a reader of 
this book would find his interest in 
this great land of the Orient restor- 
ed (after "Mother India"), and he 
would find the fascination revived for 
this realm of Hindu mysticism. 

Some criticism may be made that 
this book should have retired long 
ago from the reviewer's list. Were 
not the novels of W. H. Hudson con- 
sidered worthless for a long time 
after publication? Were they not 
given a reevaluation? Here is a 
volume that has a two-fold mission, 
but which has not received proper 
recognition. First of all the poems 
are artistic inspirations, and, second, 
they show intimately the sensitivity 
of the Hindu mind. 



DEFOE IN 1ST EDITION 



....The library of the University of 
Texas holds three volumes of the orig- 
inol edition of 'Robinson Crusoe", 
estimated to be worth $25,000. They 
are three of the only four such vol- 
umes in existence. — Muhlenburg. 

O 

The skeleton of "Traveler," the 
horse which General Robert E. Lee 
rode during the Civil War, has been 
placed in the chapel of Washington 
and Lee University. — The Bucknelian. 

O 

"The speakeasies arc not there be- 
cause the police make money out of 
them; they are there because the peo- 
ple want them." — Elmer Davis Har- 
per's. 

O 

The Japanese language may have 
to be taught in the schools of New 
York, according to Dr. Lawrence Wil- 
kins, director of foreign languages in 
that state. This will establish better 
commercial relationship with Japan, a 
nation now meeting America in trade. 
One thing is a relief, however, the 
Japanese are mastering our Ameri- 
can ? English so well that perhaps 
English is all that will be necessary. 
This will be by far the easiest solu- 
tion for us. — Wilson Billboard. 



-O- 



"The people who imagined 1 am 
shut out from Nature do not dream of 
'he world of loveliness that touch and 
the sense of smell reveal to me." — 
Helen Keller. 

O 

Football players must get their re- 
ligion somehow. The University of 
Notre Dame has just purchased a 
chapel to be added to their team's 
traveling equipment. The "traveling 
church," built by the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad, was used by the team 
recently while returning from Balti- 
more. — Bucknellian. 

O 

PHONES AT SEA 



The ''Leviathan" has started some- 
thing new in the way of steamship 
service. The ship is now equipped 
with a telephone so that anyone in 
the United States can call any pas- 
senger at sea over the Bell System 
and be connected directly with the 
person called. The equipment is a 
combination of wireless and tele- 
phone. The cost will range from $21 
to $33 per call, depending upon the 
position of the boat. 

O 

"Life is tragedy for those who feel, 
A comedy for those w T ho think" 
Thus said 

A wise man, and it struck me as I 
read 

The words, that he had closed as 

as with a seal 
The volume of Philosophy. The 
wheel 

To which we all are bound rolls 

straight ahead 
And knows no tears or laughter; we 

are led 

By our own temperaments to woe 
or weal. 

And yet, how few have feeling with- 
out thought! 

And thought without emotion, fewer 
still. 

To the great number of us, life is 
naught 

But tragi-comedy : we laugh our fill 
Hysterically, laugh until we weep — 
Then, ere the tears cease flowing, 
fall asleep. Anonymous 



MENTION LA VIE 
TO ADVERTISERS 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1929. 



PAGEANT CAST PUTS 

ON FINAL TOUCHES 
(Continued from Page 1) 



of this traditional Christmas presen- 
tation. To no other Christmas event 
should as much credit be given as to 
the directors and all the faithful 
members of the cast who are now 
working on the pageant, for no other 
project of this week has had similar 
handicaps or discouragements. 

Music and singing form a great 
portion of the pageant-cantata. Miss 
Mildred Myers will be the organist. 
The other members of the cast in- 
clude: 

Gabriel, Edgar Shroyer; John, Ed- 
ward Shollenberger; Luke, Paul Em- 
enheiser; Matthew, Perry Clements; 
Zacharias, Edgar Hertzler; Priest'. 
Samuel Ulrich; Joseph, James Mon- 
teith; Four shepherds, Paul Keene, 
Fred Mund, Chester Goodman, and 
John Beam; Simeon, Lester Kauff- 
man; Liturgist, Luther Rearick; 
Three Wise Men, Victor Kavalaski, 
Calvin Keene, and Stewart Werner; 
Wise Men's Servant, Charles Kray- 
bill; A Maidservant, Elizabeth Ul- 
rich; A Boy, Clarence Earley; Mary, 
Irene Peters; Elizabeth, Hilda Buck- 
ley; Anna, Mary Elizabeth Engle; 
Angel of Time, Grace Keener; Angel 
of Place, Mary Rank; Angel of 
Prophecy, Mary E. Stevens; Angel 
of Joy, Elizabeth Flook; Angel of 
Song, Harriet Miller, Angel of Peace, 
Mary Bumngton; other Angels, Mary 
K. Gosshert, and Hester Thompson. 
O 

DELPHIANS SEEN IN 

CLEVER PRODUCTION 

(Continued from Page i) 



Gohn, Marie Geluicks, and Helen 
Franklin displayed excellent team 
work. 

The scene which provided a touch 
of merriment was the melodrama. 
The timid little heroine, Trula Kok, 
rushes in, pursued by the big bold 
villain, Marie Geluicks, but the hero, 
Ruth Cooper, comes to her rescue. 

Those in the cast were: 

Mary (Thyrza Caruthers), Alma 
Clark; Desdemona, Bernita Strebig; 
Mrs. Jones, Eva Peck; Bridget, Dor- 
othy Hafer; Henrietta, Olive Weigel; 
Sara, Caroline Fisher; Ellen, Dorothy 
Heister; Pattie, Hester Thompson; 
Clara, Kathryn Yingst; Marguerite, 
Gladys Hershey; Anne, Dorothy 
Thompson; Merlyn, Marion Kruger; 
Rose, Ruth Shroyer; Raphaela, Hen- 
rietta Wagner. Mr. Robert J. Eshel- 
man played the overture and finale. 

a ., 

YULETIDE CELEBRATED 

BY WEST HALL CO-EDS 




THE CO-EDS' CHRISTMAS 



Just twenty years ago the girls of 
L. V. had something new, a most en- 
joyable little party, all for them- 
selves. 

The night before the Christmas va- 
cation began they went to the library 
where the hostess, who was no other 
than the dean, received them most 
cordially and ushered them into the 
reading room. 

Toward the close of the evening 
Santa Claus appeared with his pack 
and gave each one a little gift. The 
party had the traditional ending — re- 
freshments. 

CLIO ELECTS MISS 

RIFE NEW PRESIDENT 



The West Hall girls were the 
guests of Miss Ethel Myers, Dean of 
West Hall, on Tuesday evening at a 
Christmas party. After several games 
were played and the girls had worked 
up an appetite, Miss Myers served 
delicious chocolate and cookies. 
O 

ICELAND LITERATURE 

INTERESTS READERS 



The regular bi-monthly meeting 
of the Readers' Club was held at the 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Wallace Mon- 
day, December 16, 1929. The readers 
had a most unusual program, discuss- 
ing Iceland relative to her drama. 
This is the first time that Iceland 
had ever been discussed in relation 
to any work of literary merit, but the 
program introduced many new lights 
concerning Iceland. 

Ruth March, Paul Evancoe, Robert 
Eshelmann and Percy Clements in- 
terested the readers in the contribu- 
tions they made to the program. 

Dr. and Mrs. Wallace gave some 
choice morsels of entertaining facts, 
which were highly appreciated. 



Election of officers for the second 
term was held by the Clionians on 
Friday evening. The results were: 

President, Madaline Rife; Vice 
President, Margaret Smyser; Corre- 
sponding Secretary, Helen Copen- 
haver; Recording Secretary, Mildred 
Saylor; Critic, Ann Gordon; Chap- 
lain, Meredith Rice; Pianist, Doro- 
\thy Garber, and Treasurer, Alcesta 
Slichter. 

Y.W. Notes 



On Sunday evening during the Y. 
W. Friendly Hour, the spirit of 
Christmas was the theme of the even- 
ing. The service was opened with a 
piano solo by Mary K. Goshert. Mary 
Buffington read the story of Christ's 
birth, Holy Night was sung by Dor- 
othy Heister and Hester Thompson, 
a poem entitled "At Christmas" was 
read by Ruth Armacost. The last 
number was a Hawaiian guitar solo 
by Gretna Draubaugh, accompanied 
on the piano by Ruth Coble. Eva 
Peck had charge of the evening's 
service. 

O ■ 



NEW LAND FOUND 



Commander Byrd last week solved 
one of the world's, and probably its 
greatest remaining mystery. He dis- 
covered a vast range of mountains 
running north and south, east of 
King Edward Land (Antarctic Cir- 
cle). He flew over the area by air- 
plane and his photographer mapped 
the entire 150 mile stretch of terri- 
tory by the aid of an aerial camera. 
When these plates are developed, all 
the details of the region will be eas- 
ily seen. This is one of the biggest 
and probably the most important of 
the achievements of the Byrd expe- 
dition. 



OPTICAL 




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"CRANKS" 



Dr. William A. Colledge in his lec- 
ture, which was the third Star Course 
number in 19 13, spoke on the 
thought: 'Wake up to your opportun 
ities." 

He maintained that low birth or 
environment forms no bar to your 
future success if you have that "iron 
will, which will achieve anything in 
life." The iron will is self-reliance 
and will power. 

Imitation is a sign of weakness. 
The common idea of "cranks" is that 
they are fantics in certain lines but 
they are really men or women who 
have original ideas. We see the re- 
sults of these cranky ideas in many 
of our great inventions. Dr. Colledge 
said, "A crank is a specialist in some- 
thing that you take no interest in." 

From "College News." 



PRINTING 



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HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
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CHRISTMAS SPECIALS 



10% off on all Felt goods, including 
PENNANTS, BANNERS, PILLOW 
TOPS, Etc. 
15% off on all College Jewelry 
This sale includes Fraterity Pins and 
L. V. C. — Except Crown Set 

GRIMMS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



CHEFS 
HOUSE OF GOOD 
FOOD 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 
BANQUETS AND PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



YULETIDE SPIRIT 

AT PRAYER SERVICE 



The weekly Student Prayer-meet- 
ing was held on Tuesday night with 
Sarah Ensminger in charge. 

The program fitted the season of 
the year. Christmas songs were sung. 
Mary Elizaheth Stevens read a 
Christmas story; Lester Kauffman 
and Elizabeth Ulrich read some in- 
teresting poems. 

The program ended with the usual 
prayer circle and a short song serv- 
ice of Christmas carols. 



College and Fratenity 
Jewelry 



-o- 



STRICTLY ENGRAVED 
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Special Rates $2.90 per 100 
Cards and Plate 

Good until Jan. 15, 1930 
Type : Selection from 25 styles 

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YOUR PHOTOGRAPH— 
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